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SC:jazz pianist and composer

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\'manpreet singh Master | Next Rank: 500 Posts Default Avatar
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SC:jazz pianist and composer

Post Mon Aug 05, 2013 3:46 am
Thelonious Monk, who was a jazz pianist and composer, produced a body of work both rooted in the
stride-piano tradition of Willie (The Lion) Smith and Duke Ellington, yet in many ways he stood apart from the mainstream jazz repertory.

(A) Thelonious Monk, who was a jazz pianist and composer, produced a body of work both rooted
(B) Thelonious Monk, the jazz pianist and composer, produced a body of work that was rooted both
(C) Jazz pianist and composer Thelonious Monk, who produced a body of work rooted
(D) Jazz pianist and composer Thelonious Monk produced a body of work that was rooted
(E) Jazz pianist and composer Thelonious Monk produced a body of work rooted both

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Post Tue Aug 06, 2013 10:55 am
sameerballani wrote:
I have doubt on phrase "Jazz pianist and composer Thelonious Monk."
It seems we are talking about 2 people.
Such an interpretation would imply the following:
Jazz pianist produced a body of work.
This construction is not viable; the subject here would need to be A JAZZ PIANIST or THE JAZZ PIANIST.
Thus, it's clear in the OA that jazz pianist and composer serve not as distinct nouns but as MODIFIERS describing Thelonious Monk.

Please note that it is quite common for a noun to serve as a modifier.
BASEBALL player
SOCCER mom
GRAMMAR expert

In each of the cases above, the first noun serves to modify the second.

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Last edited by GMATGuruNY on Tue Aug 06, 2013 11:05 am; edited 1 time in total

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bhakk Senior | Next Rank: 100 Posts Default Avatar
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Post Tue Aug 06, 2013 10:42 am
GMATGuruNY wrote:
\'manpreet singh wrote:
Thelonious Monk, who was a jazz pianist and composer, produced a body of work both rooted in the
stride-piano tradition of Willie (The Lion) Smith and Duke Ellington, yet in many ways he stood apart from the mainstream jazz repertory.

(A) Thelonious Monk, who was a jazz pianist and composer, produced a body of work both rooted
(B) Thelonious Monk, the jazz pianist and composer, produced a body of work that was rooted both
(C) Jazz pianist and composer Thelonious Monk, who produced a body of work rooted
(D) Jazz pianist and composer Thelonious Monk produced a body of work that was rooted
(E) Jazz pianist and composer Thelonious Monk produced a body of work rooted both
both X and Y.
In this idiom, BOTH and AND are sometimes called SEESAW conjunctions.
The reason:
Like two people on a seesaw, the two elements connected by these conjunctions must BALANCE each other.
In other words, X and Y must be PARALLEL FORMS.

A: both rooted...and Duke Ellington
B and E: rooted both in the stride-rooted tradition...and Duke Ellington
In these answer choices, the forms in red are not parallel.
Eliminate A, B and E.

In C, the subject of the first clause (Thelonious Monk) lacks a verb. Eliminate C.

The correct answer is D.
Hi,

i have a doubt regarding option C
As per Mitch -
" In C, the subject of the first clause ([i]Thelonious Monk) lacks a verb."[/i]

why PRODUCED can't be a verb for that clause since who is modifying Thelonious Monk in the previous clause correctly. So subject of the forst clause THelonious Monk can have verb 'produced'

(i know that verb-ed can be a modifier but in this case,it should be a verb. PLZ explain)

TIA.

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singh002 Newbie | Next Rank: 10 Posts Default Avatar
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Post Mon Aug 05, 2013 6:35 am
A) wordy here
B) Correct

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sameerballani Legendary Member Default Avatar
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Post Mon Aug 05, 2013 9:59 am
\'manpreet singh wrote:
Thelonious Monk, who was a jazz pianist and composer, produced a body of work both rooted in the stride-piano tradition of Willie (The Lion) Smith and Duke Ellington, yet in many ways he stood apart from the mainstream jazz repertory.

(A) Thelonious Monk, who was a jazz pianist and composer, produced a body of work both rooted
(B) Thelonious Monk, the jazz pianist and composer, produced a body of work that was rooted both
(C) Jazz pianist and composer Thelonious Monk, who produced a body of work rooted
(D) Jazz pianist and composer Thelonious Monk produced a body of work that was rooted
(E) Jazz pianist and composer Thelonious Monk produced a body of work rooted both
IMO D

OA plz

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bhakk Senior | Next Rank: 100 Posts Default Avatar
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Post Tue Aug 06, 2013 2:47 am
Thats an OG question ?

IMO answer - B
option D misses the comma after Jazz pianist and composer and after Thelonious Monk because of which sentence reads Jazz Pianist and the other guy ie composer Thelonious Monk

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sameerballani Legendary Member Default Avatar
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Post Tue Aug 06, 2013 6:15 am
bhakk wrote:
Thats an OG question ?

IMO answer - B
option D misses the comma after Jazz pianist and composer and after Thelonious Monk because of which sentence reads Jazz Pianist and the other guy ie composer Thelonious Monk
In option B, I feel word BOTH is wrongly placed. Ideally, it should be before "Willie (The Lion) Smith and Duke Ellington"

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bhakk Senior | Next Rank: 100 Posts Default Avatar
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Post Tue Aug 06, 2013 6:36 am
sameerballani wrote:
bhakk wrote:
Thats an OG question ?

IMO answer - B
option D misses the comma after Jazz pianist and composer and after Thelonious Monk because of which sentence reads Jazz Pianist and the other guy ie composer Thelonious Monk
In option B, I feel word BOTH is wrongly placed. Ideally, it should be before "Willie (The Lion) Smith and Duke Ellington"
Yes, both is wrongly placed in B.
Thanks for the correction

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sameerballani Legendary Member Default Avatar
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Post Tue Aug 06, 2013 8:52 am
What's the OA?

bhakk wrote:
sameerballani wrote:
bhakk wrote:
Thats an OG question ?

IMO answer - B
option D misses the comma after Jazz pianist and composer and after Thelonious Monk because of which sentence reads Jazz Pianist and the other guy ie composer Thelonious Monk
In option B, I feel word BOTH is wrongly placed. Ideally, it should be before "Willie (The Lion) Smith and Duke Ellington"
Yes, both is wrongly placed in B.
Thanks for the correction

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Post Tue Aug 06, 2013 9:16 am
\'manpreet singh wrote:
Thelonious Monk, who was a jazz pianist and composer, produced a body of work both rooted in the
stride-piano tradition of Willie (The Lion) Smith and Duke Ellington, yet in many ways he stood apart from the mainstream jazz repertory.

(A) Thelonious Monk, who was a jazz pianist and composer, produced a body of work both rooted
(B) Thelonious Monk, the jazz pianist and composer, produced a body of work that was rooted both
(C) Jazz pianist and composer Thelonious Monk, who produced a body of work rooted
(D) Jazz pianist and composer Thelonious Monk produced a body of work that was rooted
(E) Jazz pianist and composer Thelonious Monk produced a body of work rooted both
both X and Y.
In this idiom, BOTH and AND are sometimes called SEESAW conjunctions.
The reason:
Like two people on a seesaw, the two elements connected by these conjunctions must BALANCE each other.
In other words, X and Y must be PARALLEL FORMS.

A: both rooted...and Duke Ellington
B and E: rooted both in the stride-rooted tradition...and Duke Ellington
In these answer choices, the forms in red are not parallel.
Eliminate A, B and E.

In C, the subject of the first clause (Thelonious Monk) lacks a verb. Eliminate C.

The correct answer is D.

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GMATGuruNY@gmail.com
If you find one of my posts helpful, please take a moment to click on the "UPVOTE" icon.
Available for tutoring in NYC and long-distance.
For more information, please email me at GMATGuruNY@gmail.com.

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sameerballani Legendary Member Default Avatar
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Post Tue Aug 06, 2013 10:06 am
GMATGuruNY wrote:
\'manpreet singh wrote:
Thelonious Monk, who was a jazz pianist and composer, produced a body of work both rooted in the
stride-piano tradition of Willie (The Lion) Smith and Duke Ellington, yet in many ways he stood apart from the mainstream jazz repertory.

(A) Thelonious Monk, who was a jazz pianist and composer, produced a body of work both rooted
(B) Thelonious Monk, the jazz pianist and composer, produced a body of work that was rooted both
(C) Jazz pianist and composer Thelonious Monk, who produced a body of work rooted
(D) Jazz pianist and composer Thelonious Monk produced a body of work that was rooted
(E) Jazz pianist and composer Thelonious Monk produced a body of work rooted both
both X and Y.
In this idiom, BOTH and AND are sometimes called SEESAW conjunctions.
The reason:
Like two people on a seesaw, the two elements connected by these conjunctions must BALANCE each other.
In other words, X and Y must be PARALLEL FORMS.

A: both rooted...and Duke Ellington
B and E: rooted both in the stride-rooted tradition...and Duke Ellington
In these answer choices, the forms in red are not parallel.
Eliminate A, B and E.

In C, the subject of the first clause (Thelonious Monk) lacks a verb. Eliminate C.

The correct answer is D.
Hi Mitch,

Thanks for pitching in & giving clarity on this.

I chose option D, however I have doubt on phrase "Jazz pianist and composer Thelonious Monk."
It seems we are talking about 2 people. One who is Jazz pianist and other is Thelonious who is a composer. I know these both quality are for Thelonious and you might even say that "Jazz pianist and composer" together as a whole are modifying Thelonius.
But, don't you see any ambiguity in this?
Please help me in understanding this.

Thanks.

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bhakk Senior | Next Rank: 100 Posts Default Avatar
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Post Tue Aug 06, 2013 10:58 am
sameerballani wrote:
GMATGuruNY wrote:
\'manpreet singh wrote:
Thelonious Monk, who was a jazz pianist and composer, produced a body of work both rooted in the
stride-piano tradition of Willie (The Lion) Smith and Duke Ellington, yet in many ways he stood apart from the mainstream jazz repertory.

(A) Thelonious Monk, who was a jazz pianist and composer, produced a body of work both rooted
(B) Thelonious Monk, the jazz pianist and composer, produced a body of work that was rooted both
(C) Jazz pianist and composer Thelonious Monk, who produced a body of work rooted
(D) Jazz pianist and composer Thelonious Monk produced a body of work that was rooted
(E) Jazz pianist and composer Thelonious Monk produced a body of work rooted both
both X and Y.
In this idiom, BOTH and AND are sometimes called SEESAW conjunctions.
The reason:
Like two people on a seesaw, the two elements connected by these conjunctions must BALANCE each other.
In other words, X and Y must be PARALLEL FORMS.

A: both rooted...and Duke Ellington
B and E: rooted both in the stride-rooted tradition...and Duke Ellington
In these answer choices, the forms in red are not parallel.
Eliminate A, B and E.

In C, the subject of the first clause (Thelonious Monk) lacks a verb. Eliminate C.

The correct answer is D.
Hi Mitch,

Thanks for pitching in & giving clarity on this.

I chose option D, however I have doubt on phrase "Jazz pianist and composer Thelonious Monk."
It seems we are talking about 2 people. One who is Jazz pianist and other is Thelonious who is a composer. I know these both quality are for Thelonious and you might even say that "Jazz pianist and composer" together as a whole are modifying Thelonius.
But, don't you see any ambiguity in this?
Please help me in understanding this.

Thanks.
You are correct with the fact that "Jazz pianist and composer" together as a whole are modifying Thelonius

Eg 1:

please welcome on stage, the actor and director Mr Khan.
Here the actor and director both refer to Mr Khan...in other words both modifying the Mr Khan.

I hope this helps

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sameerballani Legendary Member Default Avatar
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Post Tue Aug 06, 2013 11:33 am
Jazz pianist and composer Thelonious Monk, who produced a body of work rooted in the
stride-piano tradition of Willie (The Lion) Smith and Duke Ellington
, yet in many ways he stood apart from the mainstream jazz repertory.

Since PRODUCED is present within the subordinate phrase acting as a modifier so its playing the role of modifying "Thelonious Monk". Since this brings additional info about Thelonious Monk, it can be ignored. Read the sentence in bold, it doesn't makes sense.

Eg:
Incorrect: English Author SAM, who wrote books in the field of physics, yet he was known for his chemistry knowledge.

Correct: English Author SAM wrote books in the field of physics, yet he was known for his chemistry knowledge.

I hope this helps !!


bhakk wrote:
GMATGuruNY wrote:
\'manpreet singh wrote:
Thelonious Monk, who was a jazz pianist and composer, produced a body of work both rooted in the
stride-piano tradition of Willie (The Lion) Smith and Duke Ellington, yet in many ways he stood apart from the mainstream jazz repertory.

(A) Thelonious Monk, who was a jazz pianist and composer, produced a body of work both rooted
(B) Thelonious Monk, the jazz pianist and composer, produced a body of work that was rooted both
(C) Jazz pianist and composer Thelonious Monk, who produced a body of work rooted
(D) Jazz pianist and composer Thelonious Monk produced a body of work that was rooted
(E) Jazz pianist and composer Thelonious Monk produced a body of work rooted both
both X and Y.
In this idiom, BOTH and AND are sometimes called SEESAW conjunctions.
The reason:
Like two people on a seesaw, the two elements connected by these conjunctions must BALANCE each other.
In other words, X and Y must be PARALLEL FORMS.

A: both rooted...and Duke Ellington
B and E: rooted both in the stride-rooted tradition...and Duke Ellington
In these answer choices, the forms in red are not parallel.
Eliminate A, B and E.

In C, the subject of the first clause (Thelonious Monk) lacks a verb. Eliminate C.

The correct answer is D.
Hi,

i have a doubt regarding option C
As per Mitch -
" In C, the subject of the first clause ([i]Thelonious Monk) lacks a verb."[/i]

why PRODUCED can't be a verb for that clause since who is modifying Thelonious Monk in the previous clause correctly. So subject of the forst clause THelonious Monk can have verb 'produced'

(i know that verb-ed can be a modifier but in this case,it should be a verb. PLZ explain)

TIA.

_________________
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saurabhdhakad Junior | Next Rank: 30 Posts Default Avatar
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Post Tue Aug 06, 2013 12:12 pm
sameerballani wrote:
Jazz pianist and composer Thelonious Monk, who produced a body of work rooted in the
stride-piano tradition of Willie (The Lion) Smith and Duke Ellington
, yet in many ways he stood apart from the mainstream jazz repertory.

Since PRODUCED is present within the subordinate phrase acting as a modifier so its playing the role of modifying "Thelonious Monk". Since this brings additional info about Thelonious Monk, it can be ignored. Read the sentence in bold, it doesn't makes sense.

Eg:
Incorrect: English Author SAM, who wrote books in the field of physics, yet he was known for his chemistry knowledge.

Correct: English Author SAM wrote books in the field of physics, yet he was known for his chemistry knowledge.

I hope this helps !!


bhakk wrote:
GMATGuruNY wrote:
\'manpreet singh wrote:
Thelonious Monk, who was a jazz pianist and composer, produced a body of work both rooted in the
stride-piano tradition of Willie (The Lion) Smith and Duke Ellington, yet in many ways he stood apart from the mainstream jazz repertory.

(A) Thelonious Monk, who was a jazz pianist and composer, produced a body of work both rooted
(B) Thelonious Monk, the jazz pianist and composer, produced a body of work that was rooted both
(C) Jazz pianist and composer Thelonious Monk, who produced a body of work rooted
(D) Jazz pianist and composer Thelonious Monk produced a body of work that was rooted
(E) Jazz pianist and composer Thelonious Monk produced a body of work rooted both
both X and Y.
In this idiom, BOTH and AND are sometimes called SEESAW conjunctions.
The reason:
Like two people on a seesaw, the two elements connected by these conjunctions must BALANCE each other.
In other words, X and Y must be PARALLEL FORMS.

A: both rooted...and Duke Ellington
B and E: rooted both in the stride-rooted tradition...and Duke Ellington
In these answer choices, the forms in red are not parallel.
Eliminate A, B and E.

In C, the subject of the first clause (Thelonious Monk) lacks a verb. Eliminate C.

The correct answer is D.
Hi,

i have a doubt regarding option C
As per Mitch -
" In C, the subject of the first clause ([i]Thelonious Monk) lacks a verb."[/i]

why PRODUCED can't be a verb for that clause since who is modifying Thelonious Monk in the previous clause correctly. So subject of the forst clause THelonious Monk can have verb 'produced'

(i know that verb-ed can be a modifier but in this case,it should be a verb. PLZ explain)

TIA.
-------------------------------

In Option "C) Jazz pianist and composer Thelonious Monk, who produced a body of work rooted"

The "who clause"modifies the Thelonious monk but "Jazz pianist and composer Thelonious Monk" act as a fragment as it connects to " , yet ...remaining sentence " directly.

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Needgmat Master | Next Rank: 500 Posts Default Avatar
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Post Sat Jul 02, 2016 10:54 pm
Quote:
GMATGuruNY wrote:
\'manpreet singh wrote:
Thelonious Monk, who was a jazz pianist and composer, produced a body of work both rooted in the
stride-piano tradition of Willie (The Lion) Smith and Duke Ellington, yet in many ways he stood apart from the mainstream jazz repertory.

(A) Thelonious Monk, who was a jazz pianist and composer, produced a body of work both rooted
(B) Thelonious Monk, the jazz pianist and composer, produced a body of work that was rooted both
(C) Jazz pianist and composer Thelonious Monk, who produced a body of work rooted
(D) Jazz pianist and composer Thelonious Monk produced a body of work that was rooted
(E) Jazz pianist and composer Thelonious Monk produced a body of work rooted both
both X and Y.
In this idiom, BOTH and AND are sometimes called SEESAW conjunctions.
The reason:
Like two people on a seesaw, the two elements connected by these conjunctions must BALANCE each other.
In other words, X and Y must be PARALLEL FORMS.

A: both rooted...and Duke Ellington
B and E: rooted both in the stride-rooted tradition...and Duke Ellington
In these answer choices, the forms in red are not parallel.
Eliminate A, B and E.

In C, the subject of the first clause (Thelonious Monk) lacks a verb. Eliminate C.

The correct answer is D.
Hi GMATGuruNY ,

Just a quick questions.

1) In option A is the usage of COMMA+WHO is wrong? If so, then please explain why?

2) In option B is the usage of APPOSITIVES is wrong? If so, then please explain why?

Please explain sir.

Many thanks in advance.

Kavin

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