Faced with an estimated $2 billion budget gap, the city's

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Faced with an estimated $2 billion budget gap, the city's mayor proposed a nearly 17 percent reduction in the amount allocated the previous year to maintain the city's major cultural institutions and to subsidize hundreds of local arts groups.

(A) proposed a nearly 17 percent reduction in the amount allocated the previous year to maintain the city's major cultural institutions and to subsidize
(B) proposed a reduction from the previous year of nearly 17 percent in the amount it was allocating to maintain the city's major cultural institutions and for subsidizing
(C) proposed to reduce, by nearly 17 percent, the amount from the previous year that was allocated for the maintenance of the city's major cultural institutions and to subsidize
(D) has proposed a reduction from the previous year of nearly 17 percent of the amount it was allocating for maintaining the city's major cultural institutions, and to subsidize
(E) was proposing that the amount they were allocating be reduced by nearly 17 percent from the previous year for maintaining the city's major cultural institutions and for the subsidization


OA: A

@ Experts - I got this one right. But a quick clarification is reqd.

In A, amount allocated [IN] the previous year - isn't the MISSING PREPOSITION IN making this sentence BIT awkward ? Although this option stands out to be the BEST as others have major issues/errors.

Please shed some light on this aspect...Much thanks in advance!

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by GMATGuruNY » Wed Jun 17, 2015 6:40 am
[email protected] wrote:amount allocated [IN] the previous year - isn't the MISSING PREPOSITION IN making this sentence BIT awkward ? Although this option stands out to be the BEST as others have major issues/errors.

Please shed some light on this aspect...Much thanks in advance!
A preposition is NOT missing in the OA.
No preposition is warranted.

All of the following are correct:
the amount allocated THIS YEAR
the amount allocated LAST YEAR
the amount allocated THE PREVIOUS YEAR


the amount allocated THIS WEEK
the amount allocated LAST WEEK
the amount allocated THE PREVIOUS WEEK

the amount allocated TODAY
the amount allocated YESTERDAY
the amount allocated TUESDAY
the amount allocated THE PREVIOUS DAY
.
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by [email protected] » Wed Jun 17, 2015 7:49 am
GMATGuruNY wrote: A preposition is NOT missing in the OA.
No preposition is warranted.

All of the following are correct:
the amount allocated THIS YEAR
the amount allocated LAST YEAR
the amount allocated THE PREVIOUS YEAR
So, will it be GRAMMATICALLY wrong to use a preposition here - the amount allocated [IN] THIS YEAR ? (or it's just OPTIONAL to use a preposition in such usage ?)

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by GMATGuruNY » Thu Jun 18, 2015 2:23 am
[email protected] wrote:
GMATGuruNY wrote: A preposition is NOT missing in the OA.
No preposition is warranted.

All of the following are correct:
the amount allocated THIS YEAR
the amount allocated LAST YEAR
the amount allocated THE PREVIOUS YEAR
So, will it be GRAMMATICALLY wrong to use a preposition here - the amount allocated [IN] THIS YEAR ? (or it's just OPTIONAL to use a preposition in such usage ?)
Generally, it is unidiomatic to precede this year, last year, or the previous year with in.
SC94 in the OG13 offers another supporting example:
Heating oil prices are higher this year.
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by kutlee » Fri Jun 19, 2015 12:10 am
other than change in meaning does C have any other error?

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by GMATGuruNY » Fri Jun 19, 2015 6:59 am
kutlee wrote:other than change in meaning does C have any other error?
Errors in C:

the amount from the previous year
This meaning is nonsensical.
An amount cannot be taken FROM a year.

the previous year that was allocated
Here, that was allocated seems to modify year, implying that THE PREVIOUS YEAR was allocated.
Not the intended meaning.

Faced with an estimated $2 billion budget gap, the city's mayor proposed...to subsidize hundreds of local arts groups.
This meaning is nonsensical, implying that the mayor proposed to CLOSE THE BUDGET GAP by GIVING MONEY to hundreds of local arts groups.
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