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Gusty westerly winds will.............OG2018

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Gusty westerly winds will.............OG2018

by Mo2men » Thu Jun 15, 2017 12:29 am

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Gusty westerly winds will continue to usher in a seasonably cool air mass into the region, as a broad area of high pressure will build and bring fair and dry weather for several days.

A. to usher in a seasonably cool air mass into the region, as a broad area of high pressure will build and
B. ushering in a seasonably cool air mass into the region and a broad area of high pressure will build that
C. to usher in a seasonably cool air mass to the region, a broad area of high pressure building, and
D. ushering a seasonably cool air mass in the region, with a broad area of high pressure building and
E. to usher a seasonably cool air mass into the region while a broad area of high pressure builds, which will

OA: E

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by GMATGuruNY » Thu Jun 15, 2017 2:31 am

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Mo2men wrote:Gusty westerly winds will continue to usher in a seasonably cool air mass into the region, as a broad area of high pressure will build and bring fair and dry weather for several days.

A. to usher in a seasonably cool air mass into the region, as a broad area of high pressure will build and
B. ushering in a seasonably cool air mass into the region and a broad area of high pressure will build that
C. to usher in a seasonably cool air mass to the region, a broad area of high pressure building, and
D. ushering a seasonably cool air mass in the region, with a broad area of high pressure building and
E. to usher a seasonably cool air mass into the region while a broad area of high pressure builds, which will
A and B: to usher in...into the region
Here, in and into are redundant.
Eliminate A and B.

C: the region, a broad area of high pressure
Here, a broad area seems to refer to the region, implying that the REGION is a BROAD AREA OF HIGH PRESSURE.
Not the intended meaning.
A broad area of high pressure is not a general truth about the region but a temporary weather condition.
Eliminate C.

and must serve to connect PARALLEL FORMS
D: with a broad area of high pressure building and bring
Here, bring (verb) and building (modifier) are not parallel forms.
Eliminate D.

The correct answer is E.

OA: Gusty westerly winds will continue to usher a seasonably cool air mass into the region while a broad area of high pressure builds, which will bring fair and dry weather for several days.
Here, the only logical referent for which is the phrase in blue.
Interestingly, which is immediately preceded not by its referent but by a verb.
This usage implies that the GMAT has become less stringent about the usage of which.
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by Mo2men » Thu Jun 15, 2017 2:36 am

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GMATGuruNY wrote:
Mo2men wrote:Gusty westerly winds will continue to usher in a seasonably cool air mass into the region, as a broad area of high pressure will build and bring fair and dry weather for several days.

A. to usher in a seasonably cool air mass into the region, as a broad area of high pressure will build and
B. ushering in a seasonably cool air mass into the region and a broad area of high pressure will build that
C. to usher in a seasonably cool air mass to the region, a broad area of high pressure building, and
D. ushering a seasonably cool air mass in the region, with a broad area of high pressure building and
E. to usher a seasonably cool air mass into the region while a broad area of high pressure builds, which will
A and B: to usher in...into the region
Here, in and into are redundant.
Eliminate A and B.

C: the region, a broad area of high pressure
Here, a broad area seems to refer to the region, implying that the REGION is a BROAD AREA OF HIGH PRESSURE.
Not the intended meaning.
A broad area of high pressure is not a general truth about the region but a temporary weather condition.
Eliminate C.

and must serve to connect PARALLEL FORMS
D: with a broad area of high pressure building and bring
Here, bring (verb) and building (modifier) are not parallel forms.
Eliminate D.

The correct answer is E.

OA: Gusty westerly winds will continue to usher a seasonably cool air mass into the region while a broad area of high pressure builds, which will bring fair and dry weather for several days.
Here, the only logical referent for which is the phrase in blue.
Interestingly, which is immediately preceded not by its referent but by a verb.
This usage implies that the GMAT has become less stringent about the usage of which.
In Choice A, does the verb tenses are correct 'Gust ....will..............,as a broad area.....will'? or should one verb in present tense while the other in future tense?

In OA E: does not 'which' describe an action? It is something considered wrong in GMAT.

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by GMATGuruNY » Sat Jun 17, 2017 2:31 am

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Mo2men wrote:In Choice A, does the verb tenses are correct 'Gust ....will..............,as a broad area.....will'? or should one verb in present tense while the other in future tense?
Generally, when an as-modifier or while-modifier serves to introduce a concurrent action in the future, the future action is expressed in the SIMPLE PRESENT TENSE.
Incorrect: During the show, John will dance as Mary will sing.
Correct: During the show, John will dance as Mary SINGS.

A: Gusty westerly winds will continue, as a broad area of high pressure will build.
Here, the concurrent future action in the red as-modifier is incorrectly expressed in the future tense.
As discussed above, this concurrent action should be expressed in the simple present tense, as follows:
Gusty westerly winds will continue, as a broad area of high pressure BUILDS.
Eliminate A.
In OA E: does not 'which' describe an action? It is something considered wrong in GMAT.
In the OA, it is not possible for the which-modifier to immediately its referent (a broad area of high pressure).
Consider the following:
Gusty westerly winds will continue to usher a seasonably cool air mass into the region while a broad area of high pressure, which will bring fair and dry weather for several days, builds.
Here, the sequence is illogical:
The event in red happens AFTER the action in blue, but it appears in the sentence BEFORE the action in blue.

OA: Gusty westerly winds will continue to usher a seasonably cool air mass into the region while a broad area of high pressure builds, which will bring fair and dry weather for several days.
Here, the which-modifier appears after builds to convey the following sequence:
After a broad area of high pressure BUILDS, it WILL bring fair and dry weather for several days.
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by Ali Tariq » Sat Jun 17, 2017 5:50 pm

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Mo2men wrote:Gusty westerly winds will continue to usher in a seasonably cool air mass into the region, as a broad area of high pressure will build and bring fair and dry weather for several days.

A. to usher in a seasonably cool air mass into the region, as a broad area of high pressure will build and
B. ushering in a seasonably cool air mass into the region and a broad area of high pressure will build that
C. to usher in a seasonably cool air mass to the region, a broad area of high pressure building, and
D. ushering a seasonably cool air mass in the region, with a broad area of high pressure building and
E. to usher a seasonably cool air mass into the region while a broad area of high pressure builds, which will

OA: E
All the incorrect answer choices also have logic/meaning issues.

There are three events that will take place-

First event:some specific type of winds will continue to usher in a seasonably cool air mass into the region.
Second event: building of a broad high pressure area in that same region.
Third event: leading the way for fair and dry weather for several days.

Is there any relationship between first event and second event or are they independent of each other( ie , are they mutually exclusive)?
These two events are not independent of each other and thus are not mutually exclusive.

What is the relationship? or
How are they related?
The relationship is that of contemporaneous actions--first event and second event will take place at the same time.
only A and E communicates this meaning; i.e, as and while are appropriate tools for two contemporaneous events.

A. Gusty westerly winds will continue to usher in a seasonably cool air mass into the region, as a broad area of high pressure will build and bring fair and dry weather for several days.
E. Gusty westerly winds will continue to usher a seasonably cool air mass into the region while a broad area of high pressure builds, which will bring fair and dry weather for several days.



Is there any relationship between second event and third event or are they independent of each other( ie are they mutually exclusive)?
These two events are not independent of each other and thus are not mutually exclusive.

What is the relationship? or
How are they related?
The relationship is that of dependency--third event is dependent on second event.

Without second event having taken place, there will not be any third event.
and is not an appropriate tool to represent the relationship of dependency.
which clause, which is an adjectivial dependent clause reffering to noun a broad area of high pressure, is , on the other hand, an appropriate tool to represent this relationship of dependency.

A. Gusty westerly winds will continue to usher in a seasonably cool air mass into the region, as a broad area of high pressure will build and bring fair and dry weather for several days.
E. Gusty westerly winds will continue to usher a seasonably cool air mass into the region while a broad area of high pressure builds, which will bring fair and dry weather for several days.
Mo2men wrote:
In Choice A, does the verb tenses are correct 'Gust ....will..............,as a broad area.....will'? or should one verb in present tense while the other in future tense?
GMATGuruNY wrote:
Generally, when an as-modifier or while-modifier serves to introduce a concurrent action in the future, the future action is expressed in the SIMPLE PRESENT TENSE.
Here is another official SC( from OG 10) that has the same construction: two concurrent events in future with the second future event expressed with simple present tense.
Ms. Chambers is among the forecasters who predict that the rate of addition of arable lands will drop while those of loss rise.

A. those of loss rise
B. it rises for loss
C. those of losses rise
D. the rate of loss rises
E. there are rises for the rate of loss
OA D
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by gui_guimaraes » Wed Oct 04, 2017 7:17 am

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GMATGuruNY wrote:
Mo2men wrote:In Choice A, does the verb tenses are correct 'Gust ....will..............,as a broad area.....will'? or should one verb in present tense while the other in future tense?
Generally, when an as-modifier or while-modifier serves to introduce a concurrent action in the future, the future action is expressed in the SIMPLE PRESENT TENSE.
Incorrect: During the show, John will dance as Mary will sing.
Correct: During the show, John will dance as Mary SINGS.

A: Gusty westerly winds will continue, as a broad area of high pressure will build.
Here, the concurrent future action in the red as-modifier is incorrectly expressed in the future tense.
As discussed above, this concurrent action should be expressed in the simple present tense, as follows:
Gusty westerly winds will continue, as a broad area of high pressure BUILDS.
Eliminate A.
In OA E: does not 'which' describe an action? It is something considered wrong in GMAT.
In the OA, it is not possible for the which-modifier to immediately its referent (a broad area of high pressure).
Consider the following:
Gusty westerly winds will continue to usher a seasonably cool air mass into the region while a broad area of high pressure, which will bring fair and dry weather for several days, builds.
Here, the sequence is illogical:
The event in red happens AFTER the action in blue, but it appears in the sentence BEFORE the action in blue.

OA: Gusty westerly winds will continue to usher a seasonably cool air mass into the region while a broad area of high pressure builds, which will bring fair and dry weather for several days.
Here, the which-modifier appears after builds to convey the following sequence:
After a broad area of high pressure BUILDS, it WILL bring fair and dry weather for several days.
Mitch, do you see a parallelism problem in A and B?

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by GMATGuruNY » Thu Oct 05, 2017 4:21 am

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gui_guimaraes wrote:Mitch, do you see a parallelism problem in A and B?

Tks
The BARE INFINITIVE is the infinitive form of a verb (to + VERB) with the to omitted.
A: A broad area of high pressure will build and bring fair and dry weather.
Here, the green portions connected by and are both bare infinitives -- to build without the to and to bring without the to -- and thus are parallel.
However, the referent for the portion in red is not crystal clear.
A reader might construe the following meaning:
A broad area of high pressure will build fair and dry weather and will bring fair and dry weather.
Not the intended meaning.
Eliminate A.

B: ushering in a seasonably cool air mass into the region and a broad area of high pressure will build
Here, and incorrectly serves to connect the modifier in blue to the clause in red.
The result is a lack of parallelism.
Eliminate B.
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by skycastle19 » Tue Jan 08, 2019 6:48 pm

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Hi Mitch, in Choice C, can I say that "[i]a broad area of high pressure building[/i]" is a result of the preceding sentence? For example, is the following sentence correct?

A rock fell onto my foot, my bones being broken.

Thanks!

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by Ali Tariq » Tue Jan 08, 2019 11:11 pm

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skycastle19 wrote:Hi Mitch, in Choice C, can I say that "a broad area of high pressure building" is a result of the preceding sentence? For example, is the following sentence correct?



Thanks!
a broad area of high pressure building is an illogical appositive to region.

A rock fell onto my foot, my bones being broken.
In GMAT, you will see the following construction for the message you want to communicate:

A rock fell onto my foot, breaking my bones.

In fact, not even that because GMAC writes not in the first person. :)
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by vietnam47 » Wed Jul 24, 2019 6:52 am

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normally which/that clause must follow a noun. in choice e, however, which clause follow a short clause. this means this relative clause can jump over short verb phrase to modify the subject.

so, if you see that the relative clause dose not follow a noun, dont eliminate the choice immediately to jump into incorrect choices.

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by vietnam47 » Thu Aug 15, 2019 6:38 am

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in choice E, I think, the reason why which clause come at the end is that which clause , "which bring... " is too long . the "bring " happen after "build" is not the reason for placing "which bring..." at the end.
so , we do not need to consider meaning and time relation between " builds " and "bring".