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Because natural gas is composed mostly of methane

This topic has 2 expert replies and 6 member replies

Because natural gas is composed mostly of methane

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Because natural gas is composed mostly of methane, a simple hydrocarbon, vehicles powered by natural gas emit less of certain pollutants than the burning
of gasoline or diesel fuel.


(A) less of certain pollutants than the burning of gasoline or diesel fuel
(B) fewer of certain pollutants than burning gasoline or diesel fuel do
(C) less of certain pollutants than gasoline or diesel fuel
(D) fewer of certain pollutants than does burning gasoline or diesel fuel
(E) less of certain pollutants than those burning gasoline or diesel fuel

OA E

first "certain pollutants" seems countable , second it seems plural , shouldnt fewer be used in right ans ??

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Mo2men wrote:
Dear GMATGuruNY,

Is the OA: E clear? or does it need verb 'do'? is understood from the context.
My proposed choice:
(E) less of certain pollutants than do those burning gasoline or diesel fuel

Thanks in advance for your help
Both of the following are viable:
Vehicles powered by natural gas emit less of certain pollutants than those burning gasoline or diesel fuel.
Vehicles powered by ndatural gas emit less of certain pollutants than do those burning gasoline or diesel fuel.
The inclusion of do is optional.
With or without do, the intended comparison is clear:
Vehicles powered by natural gas emit less of certain pollutants than those burning gasoline or diesel fuel [emit certain pollutants].

No verb is required in the second clause as long as the intended comparison is crystal clear.
Correct:
John ate more pizza than Mary.
Here, only interpretation is possible:
John ate more pizza than Mary ate.
Since the intended comparison is crystal clear, a verb is not required in the second clause.

Not viable:
Russia exports more oil to Europe than the United States.
Here, the intended comparison is NOT crystal clear.
Two possible meanings:
Case 1: Russia exports more oil to Europe than IT EXPORTS OIL TO THE UNITED STATES.
Case 2: Russia exports more oil to Europe than THE UNITED STATES EXPORTS OIL TO EUROPE.
If Case 2 is intended, a verb is required in the second clause to make the intended comparison crystal clear.
Correct:
China exports more oil to Europe than DOES the United States.

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I feel "less" and "fewer" are completely different here and would have different meanings.

Let us say pollutants emitted are A, B and C.

less of certain pollutants: A, B and C are emitted, but the "quantity" of A, B and C would be less.

fewer pollutants: Not all the three (A, B and C) will be emitted. Perhaps only A and B will be emitted.

Since the original sentence says "less of certain pollutants", changing it to "fewer" would change the meaning.

This is my understanding. Let's see what experts have to say. Is it an official question? If yes, can you also post the official explanation?

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bonetlobo appreciate the tough analysis by you , please follow the link
https://www.manhattanprep.com/gmat/forums/because-natural-gas-is-composed-mostly-t4057.html

but lets wait for experts call

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Hello Vipul, I went through the thread, and the response of a Manhattan GMAT staff seems to be in line with what I explained above. To quote the staff:

* fewer of those pollutants and less of those pollutants have different meanings.
the former means that, if you made lists of the pollutants from each of the two sources, then one of the lists would be missing pollutants that were on the other list.
the latter means that both lists would contain the same pollutants, but that the quantities would be lower on one side.

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FEWER of the pollutants = A SMALLER NUMBER of the different types of pollutants.
For example:
Of the 1000 types of pollutants, only 10 types are emitted.

LESS of the pollutants = A SMALLER AMOUNT of each type of pollutant.
For example:
Of each type of pollutant, only 10cm³ is emitted.

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GMATGuruNY@gmail.com

If you find one of my posts helpful, please take a moment to click on the "UPVOTE" icon.

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For more information, please email me at GMATGuruNY@gmail.com.
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Student Review #3

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yes, as little brother and few of brothers both are correct but in different context

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GMATGuruNY wrote:
FEWER of the pollutants = A SMALLER NUMBER of the different types of pollutants.
For example:
Of the 1000 types of pollutants, only 10 types are emitted.

LESS of the pollutants = A SMALLER AMOUNT of each type of pollutant.
For example:
Of each type of pollutant, only 10cm³ is emitted.
Dear GMATGuruNY,

Is the OA: E clear? or does it need verb 'do'? is understood from the context.
My proposed choice:
(E) less of certain pollutants than do those burning gasoline or diesel fuel

Thanks in advance for your help

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GMATGuruNY wrote:
Mo2men wrote:
Dear GMATGuruNY,

Is the OA: E clear? or does it need verb 'do'? is understood from the context.
My proposed choice:
(E) less of certain pollutants than do those burning gasoline or diesel fuel

Thanks in advance for your help
Both of the following are viable:
Vehicles powered by natural gas emit less of certain pollutants than those burning gasoline or diesel fuel.
Vehicles powered by ndatural gas emit less of certain pollutants than do those burning gasoline or diesel fuel.
The inclusion of do is optional.
With or without do, the intended comparison is clear:
Vehicles powered by natural gas emit less of certain pollutants than those burning gasoline or diesel fuel [emit certain pollutants].

No verb is required in the second clause as long as the intended comparison is crystal clear.
Correct:
John ate more pizza than Mary.
Here, only interpretation is possible:
John ate more pizza than Mary ate.
Since the intended comparison is crystal clear, a verb is not required in the second clause.

Not viable:
Russia exports more oil to Europe than the United States.
Here, the intended comparison is NOT crystal clear.
Two possible meanings:
Case 1: Russia exports more oil to Europe than IT EXPORTS OIL TO THE UNITED STATES.
Case 2: Russia exports more oil to Europe than THE UNITED STATES EXPORTS OIL TO EUROPE.
If Case 2 is intended, a verb is required in the second clause to make the intended comparison crystal clear.
Correct:
China exports more oil to Europe than DOES the United States.
Wonderful explanation. Thanks a lot

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