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According to historians official gmat paper test

This topic has 1 expert reply and 0 member replies
gocoder Master | Next Rank: 500 Posts Default Avatar
Joined
05 Dec 2015
Posted:
120 messages
Target GMAT Score:
720

According to historians official gmat paper test

Post Mon Dec 12, 2016 12:08 am
Historians of women’s labor in the United States at first
largely disregarded the story of female service workers
-women earning wages in occupations such as salesclerk.
domestic servant, and office secretary. These historians
(5) focused instead on factory work, primarily because it
seemed so different from traditional, unpaid “women’s
work” in the home, and because the underlying economic
forces of industrialism were presumed to be gender-blind
and hence emancipatory in effect. Unfortunately, emanci-
(10) pation has been less profound than expected, for not even
industrial wage labor has escaped continued sex segregation
in the workplace.

To explain this unfinished revolution in the status of
women, historians have recently begun to emphasize the
( 15) way a prevailing definition of femininity often etermines
the kinds of work allocated to women, even when such
allocation is inappropriate to new conditions. For instance,
early textile-mill entrepreneurs, in justifying women’s
employment in wage labor, made much of the assumption
(20) that women were by nature skillful at detailed tasks and
patient in carrying out repetitive chores; the mill owners
thus imported into the new industrial order hoary stereotypes
associated with the homemaking activities they
presumed to have been the purview of women. Because
(25)women accepted the more unattractive new industrial tasks
more readily than did men, such jobs came to be regarded
as female jobs.And employers, who assumed that women’s
“real” aspirations were for marriage and family life.
declined to pay women wages commensurate with those of
(30) men. Thus many lower-skilled, lower-paid, less secure jobs
came to be perceived as “female.”

More remarkable than the origin has been the persistence
of such sex segregation in twentieth-century industry. Once
an occupation came to be perceived as “female.” employers
(35) showed surprisingly little interest in changing that percep-
-tion, even when higher profits beckoned. And despite the
urgent need of the United States during the Second World War
to mobilize its human resources fully, job segregation by sex
characterized even the most important
(40) war industries. Moreover, once the war ended, employers
quickly returned to men most of the “male” jobs that
women had been permitted to master.


The passage supports which of the following statements about hiring policies in the United States?
(A) After a crisis many formerly “male” jobs are reclassified as “female” jobs.
(B) Industrial employers generally prefer to hire women with previous experience as homemakers.
(C) Post-Second World War hiring policies caused women to lose many of their wartime gains in employment opportunity.
(D) Even war industries during the Second World War were reluctant to hire women for factory work.
(E) The service sector of the economy has proved more nearly gender-blind in its hiring policies than has the manufacturing sector.

I was torn apart between C and D
.

I think both of them are mentioned in the passages.

To evaluate D, i see that passage mentions 'most important war industries'; otherwise it seems to be okay.
Choice C seemed to me weird because this choice talks about policies,which seemed to me some set of rules prescribed by the govt. or employer association never mentioned in the passage.

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GMAT/MBA Expert

Post Wed Jan 11, 2017 4:32 am
gocoder wrote:
Historians of women’s labor in the United States at first
largely disregarded the story of female service workers
-women earning wages in occupations such as salesclerk.
domestic servant, and office secretary. These historians
(5) focused instead on factory work, primarily because it
seemed so different from traditional, unpaid “women’s
work” in the home, and because the underlying economic
forces of industrialism were presumed to be gender-blind
and hence emancipatory in effect. Unfortunately, emanci-
(10) pation has been less profound than expected, for not even
industrial wage labor has escaped continued sex segregation
in the workplace.

To explain this unfinished revolution in the status of
women, historians have recently begun to emphasize the
( 15) way a prevailing definition of femininity often etermines
the kinds of work allocated to women, even when such
allocation is inappropriate to new conditions. For instance,
early textile-mill entrepreneurs, in justifying women’s
employment in wage labor, made much of the assumption
(20) that women were by nature skillful at detailed tasks and
patient in carrying out repetitive chores; the mill owners
thus imported into the new industrial order hoary stereotypes
associated with the homemaking activities they
presumed to have been the purview of women. Because
(25)women accepted the more unattractive new industrial tasks
more readily than did men, such jobs came to be regarded
as female jobs.And employers, who assumed that women’s
“real” aspirations were for marriage and family life.
declined to pay women wages commensurate with those of
(30) men. Thus many lower-skilled, lower-paid, less secure jobs
came to be perceived as “female.”

More remarkable than the origin has been the persistence
of such sex segregation in twentieth-century industry. Once
an occupation came to be perceived as “female.” employers
(35) showed surprisingly little interest in changing that percep-
-tion, even when higher profits beckoned. And despite the
urgent need of the United States during the Second World War
to mobilize its human resources fully, job segregation by sex
characterized even the most important
(40) war industries. Moreover, once the war ended, employers
quickly returned to men most of the “male” jobs that
women had been permitted to master.


The passage supports which of the following statements about hiring policies in the United States?
The answer is IN THE PASSAGE:
Once the war ended, employers quickly returned to men most of the “male” jobs that women had been permitted to master.
Conveyed meaning:
During the war, women were permitted to master "male" jobs.
After the war, employers quickly returned these jobs to men, with the result that women were NO LONGER permitted to master "male" jobs.
This information supports C:
Post-Second World War hiring policies caused women to lose many of their wartime gains in employment opportunity.

The correct answer is C.

D: Even war industries during the Second World War were reluctant to hire women for factory work.
The passage states only that job segregation by sex characterized even the most important war industries.
No indication that these war industries involved factory work.
Eliminate D.

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