After arduous months of fighting........

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After arduous months of fighting........

by pzazz12 » Mon Oct 25, 2010 4:10 am
After arduous months of fighting, the sight of the white flag being raised generated as much relief on the victor's side than it did on the vanquished.

A. as much relief on the victor's side than it did on the vanquished.
B. as much relief among the victors as among the vanquished.
C. as much relief on the victor's side as it did on the vanquished's.
D. relief both on the victor's side as well as on the vanquished's.
E. relief both for the victor and the vanquished side.

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by ramannjit » Mon Oct 25, 2010 4:22 am
Will go with B: as much X as X
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by GMATMadeEasy » Tue Oct 26, 2010 8:01 am
I'd say C. If it is B, can someone explain please why?

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by ramannjit » Tue Oct 26, 2010 8:18 am
GMATMadeEasy wrote:I'd say C. If it is B, can someone explain please why?
A: As much.... than, wrong usage.

D: both .. as well as, wrong usage.

C: Vanquished's: wrong usage

E: No parallelism. Meaning altered

So B is coorect: as much relief among the victors as among the vanquished. Correct idiom usage
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by kapur.arnav » Tue Oct 26, 2010 8:44 am
pzazz12 wrote:After arduous months of fighting, the sight of the white flag being raised generated as much relief on the victor's side than it did on the vanquished.
My 2 cents...

A. as much relief on the victor's side than it did on the vanquished - as much x than y... wrong... we say as much x as y... than is used if we use more... more x than y

B. as much relief among the victors as among the vanquished - correct usage

C. as much relief on the victor's side as it did on the vanquished's - vanquished's - wrong usage... it needs to explicitly say vanquished side

D. relief both on the victor's side as well as on the vanquished's - usage of both and as well as is redundant and not required...

E. relief both for the victor and the vanquished side - lacks parallelism... victor side and the vanquished side..

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by GMATMadeEasy » Wed Oct 27, 2010 7:00 am
C: Vanquished's: wrong usage
in my opinion, it is correct usge ?

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by DarkKnight » Wed Oct 27, 2010 1:53 pm
Whats the OA?

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by gmatrix » Wed Oct 27, 2010 8:26 pm
my pick B
Life is all about ass; you're either covering it, laughing it off, kicking it, kissing it, busting it, trying to get a piece of it, or behaving like one.

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by pradeepkaushal9518 » Wed Oct 27, 2010 8:44 pm
ya as much X as Y should be correct.

B
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by Jen@VeritasPrep » Fri Oct 29, 2010 7:49 am
Good discussion on this one! You're right that the correct comparison idioms are as....as or both....and. This lets you eliminate A and D. In E, the comparison isn't logical -- it's comparing a victor (a person) to a vanquished side.

In answer choice C, "vanquished's" is a bit awkward -- it would be preferable to use the more straightforward adjective structure "vanquished side," which would be parallel with something like "victorious side." But the logical difference between B and C can help you here as well. It makes more sense for PEOPLE to feel relief than for sides to feel relief. This meaning is much clearer in B -- relief among the victors and vanquished. Clarity of meaning is VERY important on SC questions -- sentences must be grammatically AND logically correct.
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by GMATMadeEasy » Fri Oct 29, 2010 9:33 am
But the logical difference between B and C can help you here as well. It makes more sense for PEOPLE to feel relief than for sides to feel relief.
Thank you very much for your explanation on this. But this is cruel of GMAT if they test meaning up to that extent. It is hard to distinguish the line between real word usage and puristy grammar approach . To my ears both sound cporrect :(((

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by shweta.kalra » Fri Oct 29, 2010 10:33 am
thanks For the explanation JEN
PLZ CLARIFY WHAT DOES "IT" REFERS TO IN "C" OR S T AMBIGUOUS?
THANKS

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by Jen@VeritasPrep » Fri Oct 29, 2010 10:38 am
The antecedent of "it" in choice C is "the sight" -- this is the only logical antecedent here, so the pronoun use is fine. There can be multiple potential grammatical antecedents for a pronoun, but if only one is logical then the usage is correct. But C still has the other issues that I mentioned above.
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by LalaB » Sun Sep 25, 2011 9:25 pm
+1 for C

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by GmatKiss » Mon Sep 26, 2011 6:04 am
clear B