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VERB-ed modifier..... adverb or adjective

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Mo2men Legendary Member Default Avatar
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VERB-ed modifier..... adverb or adjective

Post Fri Sep 22, 2017 1:06 am
Insufficiently trained for combat, the soldier was grievously injured in battle and sank once again into unconsciousness, anesthetized by the medicine required by the many rounds of surgery necessary to save his badly wounded leg.

a) battle and sank once again into unconsciousness, anesthetized by
b) battle, sank once again into unconsciousness, and anesthetized
c) battle, sinking once again into unconsciousness, was anesthetized by
d) battle and sank once again into unconsciousness, and was anesthetized
e) battle, sinking once again into unconsciousness and being anesthetized by

Source: Veritas
OA: A

In Veritas Official answer:

"In choice A, "anesthetized" is used as a modifier at the end of the sentence. For that meaning, the soldier has two verbs: was injured, and sank into unconsciousness. And the verb anesthetized describes how the soldier sank into unconsciousness."

According to my knowledge:

VERB-ed modifier is an adjective that modifies the nearest noun. But according to above explanation, it acts as adverb that modifies verb!!

How VERb-ed modifier works as adverb? any OG question cited??!!!!

Thanks

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Post Sat Sep 23, 2017 2:45 am
Insufficiently trained for combat, the soldier was grievously injured in battle and sank once again into unconsciousness.

This SC seems to imply that the soldier was still in battle when he sank once again into unconsciousness.
Not the intended meaning.
I would ignore this SC.

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Mo2men Legendary Member Default Avatar
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Post Sat Sep 23, 2017 2:48 am
GMATGuruNY wrote:
Insufficiently trained for combat, the soldier was grievously injured in battle and sank once again into unconsciousness.

This SC seems to imply that the soldier was still in battle when he sank once again into unconsciousness.
Not the intended meaning.
I would ignore this SC.
Thanks Mitch for your reply.

Regardless of the meaning, Can VERB-ed modifier work as an adverb? Can it describe a verb??!!

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Post Sat Sep 23, 2017 6:40 pm
Mo2men wrote:
GMATGuruNY wrote:
Insufficiently trained for combat, the soldier was grievously injured in battle and sank once again into unconsciousness.

This SC seems to imply that the soldier was still in battle when he sank once again into unconsciousness.
Not the intended meaning.
I would ignore this SC.
Thanks Mitch for your reply.

Regardless of the meaning, Can VERB-ed modifier work as an adverb? Can it describe a verb??!!
While a nonessential VERBed modifier that refers to the subject is primarily an adjective, it also plays an adverbial role, since it provides context for the main action.

SC36 in the OG12:
Dressed as a man, Deborah Sampson joined the Continental Army in 1782.
Here, the nonessential VERBed modifier in blue is primarily an adjective serving to describe Deborah Sampson, but it also plays an adverbial role, since it expresses how Deborah Sampson was DRESSED when she JOINED the army.

Generally, a nonessential VERBed modifier that refers to the subject will express an action performed BEFORE the main action.
For this reason, a nonessential VERBed modifier that refers to the subject will typically PRECEDE the main verb.
In SC36, dressed (a nonessential modifier referring to the subject Deborah Sampson) precedes joined (the main verb) because Deborah Sampson was DRESSED as a man BEFORE she JOINED the army.

OA above: The soldier sank into unconsciousness, anesthetized by the medicine.
Here, the VERBed modifier in blue serves to express an action that PRECEDES the main action, since the soldier was anesthetized BEFORE he sank into unconsciousness.
For this reason, the GMAT would position the VERBed modifier in blue before the main clause, as follows:
Anesthetized by the medicine, the soldier sank into unconsciousness.
Here, the nonessential VERBed modifier in blue is primarily an adjective serving to describe the soldier, but it also plays an adverbial role, since it expresses the soldier's state-of-being when he SANK into unconsciousness.

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For more information, please email me at GMATGuruNY@gmail.com.

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Mo2men Legendary Member Default Avatar
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Post Sun Sep 24, 2017 3:03 am
GMATGuruNY wrote:
Mo2men wrote:
GMATGuruNY wrote:
Insufficiently trained for combat, the soldier was grievously injured in battle and sank once again into unconsciousness.

This SC seems to imply that the soldier was still in battle when he sank once again into unconsciousness.
Not the intended meaning.
I would ignore this SC.
Thanks Mitch for your reply.

Regardless of the meaning, Can VERB-ed modifier work as an adverb? Can it describe a verb??!!
While a nonessential VERBed modifier that refers to the subject is primarily an adjective, it also plays an adverbial role, since it provides context for the main action.

SC36 in the OG12:
Dressed as a man, Deborah Sampson joined the Continental Army in 1782.
Here, the nonessential VERBed modifier in blue is primarily an adjective serving to describe Deborah Sampson, but it also plays an adverbial role, since it expresses how Deborah Sampson was DRESSED when she JOINED the army.

Generally, a nonessential VERBed modifier that refers to the subject will express an action performed BEFORE the main action.
For this reason, a nonessential VERBed modifier that refers to the subject will typically PRECEDE the main verb.
In SC36, dressed (a nonessential modifier referring to the subject Deborah Sampson) precedes joined (the main verb) because Deborah Sampson was DRESSED as a man BEFORE she JOINED the army.

OA above: The soldier sank into unconsciousness, anesthetized by the medicine.
Here, the VERBed modifier in blue serves to express an action that PRECEDES the main action, since the soldier was anesthetized BEFORE he sank into unconsciousness.
For this reason, the GMAT would position the VERBed modifier in blue before the main clause, as follows:
Anesthetized by the medicine, the soldier sank into unconsciousness.
Here, the nonessential VERBed modifier in blue is primarily an adjective serving to describe the soldier, but it also plays an adverbial role, since it expresses the soldier's state-of-being when he SANK into unconsciousness.
Thanks Mitch.

It makes sense.

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