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the dreaded ERROR LOG

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the dreaded ERROR LOG

by lpierce10 » Tue Jul 26, 2016 4:49 am
I'm working through my "study plan" for my 2nd attempt and I'm trying to use my error log on a more regular basis. If I get a problem wrong in any of the OG books, I log it here and note it in a spreadsheet that has all the answers for each OG book I have. I will redo some of the problems, but without looking at the error log? Am I using it incorrectly? Here's an example:

- I do a set of problems, I get 3 incorrect. I read through the explanations of the incorrect AND correct answers. If I did not understand the concept, I then work through the problem in my error log (a spiral notebook). Writing out all the steps to complete the problem and noting my mistakes
- I note the incorrect answer in my spreadsheet error log so that I can redo the problem at a later date

My confusion comes when I sit down for my next study session. Do I go back through the problems I got incorrect the last time I studied at the beginning of my study session or at the end? Do I go through them at all? Do I review the error log at the end of each study session? I am looking for some direction as to how to properly use this error log that I've created.

Thanks!

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by Rich.C@EMPOWERgmat.com » Tue Jul 26, 2016 8:58 am
Hi lpierce10,

There are a variety of different ways that you can use your Error Log for review purposes. However you choose to use it though, you have to remember its ultimate purpose - you're looking to remove those errors from your 'process.' If the issue with a particular question is content-based (re. you couldn't remember a math formula or grammar rule), then your need is more about memorization and recognizing when a particular rule applies. If the issue is functional (you couldn't figure out the 'steps' to solve the question), then redoing the question (and/or using a different approach than the one that you tried the first time) could benefit you in a number of ways. You'll be honing skills that apply to more than just that one question. In both scenarios, reviewing your Error Log BEFORE you start working on any new material would make sense, since you'll have that 'new' knowledge fresh in your mind.

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by Bara » Tue Jul 26, 2016 5:08 pm
I agree with Rich.

Another approach you may want to integrate is to set up another time to just go through the error log, and even redo some of those questions at random. Also, teaching someone else how to do those questions, or pretending like you're teaching someone is a great way to learn.

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by ceilidh.erickson » Thu Dec 21, 2017 9:59 am
lpierce10 wrote:I'm working through my "study plan" for my 2nd attempt and I'm trying to use my error log on a more regular basis. If I get a problem wrong in any of the OG books, I log it here and note it in a spreadsheet that has all the answers for each OG book I have. I will redo some of the problems, but without looking at the error log? Am I using it incorrectly? Here's an example:

- I do a set of problems, I get 3 incorrect. I read through the explanations of the incorrect AND correct answers. If I did not understand the concept, I then work through the problem in my error log (a spiral notebook). Writing out all the steps to complete the problem and noting my mistakes
- I note the incorrect answer in my spreadsheet error log so that I can redo the problem at a later date

My confusion comes when I sit down for my next study session. Do I go back through the problems I got incorrect the last time I studied at the beginning of my study session or at the end? Do I go through them at all? Do I review the error log at the end of each study session? I am looking for some direction as to how to properly use this error log that I've created.

Thanks!
Your biggest issue: you're relying first on the explanations to tell you what you did wrong.

When you see that you got 3 problems wrong, first REDO them yourself - before looking at the right answer! If you can figure out what the right answer was and how you should have gotten there, that understanding is much more likely to stick with you than if you just read passively over what someone else said. Right now you're only redoing it if you didn't understand the explanation. You're not making yourself do the hard work that's necessary for deep understanding!

Your 2nd issue: you're using the log just to record incorrect answers. You should use the log to DESCRIBE your mistake!

Imagine that you're speaking to your future self. You want to describe in detail: "I forgot about the negative sign when square rooting. Always remember that even exponents = multiple solutions!"

More here for how to use a review log effectively: https://www.manhattanprep.com/gmat/blog ... -studying/
Ceilidh Erickson
EdM in Mind, Brain, and Education
Harvard Graduate School of Education