new sentence pattern on gmat

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new sentence pattern on gmat

by tanviet » Sat Jan 03, 2009 7:17 pm
this is Q.2 in OG 10

Since 1981, when the farm depression began,, the number of acres overseen by professional farm-management companies /have grown from 48 million to nearly 59 million, an area that is about Colorado's size/

a,

b, have grown from 48 million to nearly 59 million, about the size of Colorado

c, has grown from 48 million to nearly 59 million, an area about size of Colorado

d, has grown from 48 million up to nearly 59 million, an area about the size of Colorado's

e,has grown from 48 million up to nearly 59 million, about Colorado's size


C is correct , a,b,d are clearly wrong. But

"an area " in C refers to what, What is this pattern. I do not see this pattern in grammar book.

why E is wrong. pls fullly explain.

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Re: new sentence pattern on gmat

by logitech » Sat Jan 03, 2009 7:36 pm
duongthang wrote:this is Q.2 in OG 10

Since 1981, when the farm depression began,, the number of acres overseen by professional farm-management companies /have grown from 48 million to nearly 59 million, an area that is about Colorado's size/

the number is SINGULAR so eliminate A and B

After the 59 million, you need to repeat whatever that is 59 million to modify it otherwise you will modify 59 million itself like in option E.

E is gone

D has the double possession problem:

size of Colorado's

c, has grown from 48 million to nearly 59 million, an area about size of Colorado

d, has grown from 48 million up to nearly 59 million, an area about the size of Colorado's

e,has grown from 48 million up to nearly 59 million, about Colorado's size
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by pandeyvineet24 » Sat Jan 03, 2009 9:09 pm
Also, in choice D and E, "up" is redundant.


According to Manhattan. Always avoid the construction "Of X's". Use "Of X" or "X's".

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by tanviet » Sun Jan 04, 2009 8:52 pm
Logitech

C here is "resumptive" sentence. is that right?

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by logitech » Sun Jan 04, 2009 9:26 pm
duongthang wrote:Logitech

C here is "resumptive" sentence. is that right?
YEAP!
A resumptive modifier picks up a word or phrase from a sentence that seems to be finished and then adds information and takes the reader into new territory of thought. Because resumptive modifiers are, by nature, repetitive, they tend also to add a sense of rhythm to a sentence. The following sentence (borrowed from above) employs this strategy twice:

* The Swiss watchmakers' failure to capitalize on the invention of the digital timepiece was both astonishing and alarming — astonishing in that the Swiss had, since the beginnings of the industrial revolution in Europe, been among the first to capitalize on technical innovations, alarming in that a tremendous industrial potential had been lost to their chief competitors, the watchmakers of Japan.

A summative modifier quickly re-names or sums up what was going on in an earlier part of the sentence and then adds new information:

* The defensive coaches taught risk-taking, ball-hawking, and perpetual movement — three strategies that bewildered the opposition and resulted in many bad passes, steals, and easy fastbreak baskets.
LGTCH
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