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Johnson

by dumb.doofus » Wed Jul 08, 2009 9:25 pm
Johnson is on firm ground when he asserts that the early editors of Dickinson’s poetry often distorted her intentions. Yet Johnson’s own, more faithful, text is still guilty of its own forms of distortion. To standardize Dickinson’s often indecipherable handwritten punctuation by the use of the dash is to render permanent a casual mode of poetic phrasing that Dickinson surely never expected to see in print. It implies that Dickinson chose the dash as her typical mark of punctuation when, in fact, she apparently never made any definitive choice at all.
Which of the following best summarizes the author’s main point?

(A) Although Johnson is right in criticizing Dickinson’s early editors for their distortion of her work, his own text is guilty of equally serious distortions.
(B) Johnson’s use of the dash in his text of Dickinson’s poetry misleads readers about the poet’s intentions.
(C) Because Dickinson never expected her poetry to be published, virtually any attempt at editing it must run counter to her intentions.
(D) Although Johnson’s attempt to produce a more faithful text of Dickinson’s poetry is well-meaning, his study of the material lacks sufficient thoroughness.
(E) Dickinson’s editors, including Johnson, have failed to deal adequately with the problem of deciphering Dickinson’s handwritten manuscripts.
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by shilpi84 » Thu Jul 09, 2009 12:12 am
IMO E

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by raghavsarathy » Thu Jul 09, 2009 2:20 am
IMHO - E

Dickinson's handwriting(along with some punctuation) has made it difficult for people to decipher her true intentions. And Johnson or any other editor could fail to understand the true meaning..

C seems very close.. I am tempted to choose it.. But I thought that I made a strong statement that none could ever decipher the true meaning of Dickinson's poerty.. Maybe sometime in the future , a prodigy might end up translating accurately..

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Re: Johnson

by ssmiles08 » Thu Jul 09, 2009 10:57 am
dumb.doofus wrote:Johnson is on firm ground when he asserts that the early editors of Dickinson’s poetry often distorted her intentions. Yet Johnson’s own, more faithful, text is still guilty of its own forms of distortion. To standardize Dickinson’s often indecipherable handwritten punctuation by the use of the dash is to render permanent a casual mode of poetic phrasing that Dickinson surely never expected to see in print. It implies that Dickinson chose the dash as her typical mark of punctuation when, in fact, she apparently never made any definitive choice at all.
Which of the following best summarizes the author’s main point?

(A) Although Johnson is right in criticizing Dickinson’s early editors for their distortion of her work, his own text is guilty of equally serious distortions.
(B) Johnson’s use of the dash in his text of Dickinson’s poetry misleads readers about the poet’s intentions.

I think the answer is A or B. I would pick B.

The bold part is the conclusion. The main point is something that rephrases the conclusion.

I would cross off A b/c nothing in the stimulus states that Dickinson's distortions were EQUALLY serious. It does claim that the text is distorted and misleading of the author's main intent.

IMO B.

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by ketkoag » Thu Jul 09, 2009 11:22 am
my pick is B coz it clearly says that Dickson never used dashes and the dashes used in the poetry are misinterpreted by reader that these are used by the author..
All the other choices are distorted or out of scope..

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Re: Johnson

by sethi.ashwinder@gmail.com » Thu Jul 09, 2009 7:12 pm
I would go with A becasue

(B) Does not talk about other early editors
(C) Never mentioned that Dickinson never wanted to see his poetry in print (he just never expected it)
(D) Nowhere mentioned that johnson lacks thoroughness
(E) Tempting but would go with A

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by dumb.doofus » Thu Jul 09, 2009 10:09 pm
OA B
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Re: Johnson

by graghukalyan » Thu Jul 09, 2009 10:25 pm
dumb.doofus wrote:Johnson is on firm ground when he asserts that the early editors of Dickinson’s poetry often distorted her intentions. Yet Johnson’s own, more faithful, text is still guilty of its own forms of distortion. To standardize Dickinson’s often indecipherable handwritten punctuation by the use of the dash is to render permanent a casual mode of poetic phrasing that Dickinson surely never expected to see in print. It implies that Dickinson chose the dash as her typical mark of punctuation when, in fact, she apparently never made any definitive choice at all.
Which of the following best summarizes the author’s main point?

(A) Although Johnson is right in criticizing Dickinson’s early editors for their distortion of her work, his own text is guilty of equally serious distortions.
(B) Johnson’s use of the dash in his text of Dickinson’s poetry misleads readers about the poet’s intentions.
(C) Because Dickinson never expected her poetry to be published, virtually any attempt at editing it must run counter to her intentions.
(D) Although Johnson’s attempt to produce a more faithful text of Dickinson’s poetry is well-meaning, his study of the material lacks sufficient thoroughness.
(E) Dickinson’s editors, including Johnson, have failed to deal adequately with the problem of deciphering Dickinson’s handwritten manuscripts.
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Source for this question pls !

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by dumb.doofus » Sat Jul 11, 2009 12:34 am
1000 RCs doc file
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by Domnu » Sat Jul 11, 2009 1:35 am
I agree with answer choice B; A is incorrect as this states that the misinterpretations are equally serious. C and D are out of scope. E is incorrect, because it is possible that another editor, who is neither early nor Johnson interpreted Dickinson's writing properly.
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by kanha81 » Wed Jul 15, 2009 1:46 pm
Domnu wrote:I agree with answer choice B; A is incorrect as this states that the misinterpretations are equally serious. C and D are out of scope. E is incorrect, because it is possible that another editor, who is neither early nor Johnson interpreted Dickinson's writing properly.
This is quite an intriguing question. I understand and accept the answer now that I have read the stimulus couple of times, but based on the information provided, can't we conclude that neither the editors nor Johnson was able to interpret Dickinson's work adequately?--- This is what the author is stating as mentioned in [E].
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by goelmohit2002 » Wed Jul 15, 2009 2:15 pm
kanha81 wrote:but based on the information provided, can't we conclude that neither the editors nor Johnson was able to interpret Dickinson's work adequately?--- This is what the author is stating as mentioned in [E].
IMO no....we cannot concluse the same....

why because author restricts about only two editors.....

there might be other editors too.....and we cannot say anything about those other editors based on the info of only two editors....

basically other editors are out of scope.

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Re: Johnson

by dtweah » Wed Jul 15, 2009 2:33 pm
dumb.doofus wrote:Johnson is on firm ground when he asserts that the early editors of Dickinson’s poetry often distorted her intentions. Yet Johnson’s own, more faithful, text is still guilty of its own forms of distortion. To standardize Dickinson’s often indecipherable handwritten punctuation by the use of the dash is to render permanent a casual mode of poetic phrasing that Dickinson surely never expected to see in print. It implies that Dickinson chose the dash as her typical mark of punctuation when, in fact, she apparently never made any definitive choice at all.
Which of the following best summarizes the author’s main point?

(A) Although Johnson is right in criticizing Dickinson’s early editors for their distortion of her work, his own text is guilty of equally serious distortions.
(B) Johnson’s use of the dash in his text of Dickinson’s poetry misleads readers about the poet’s intentions.
(C) Because Dickinson never expected her poetry to be published, virtually any attempt at editing it must run counter to her intentions.
(D) Although Johnson’s attempt to produce a more faithful text of Dickinson’s poetry is well-meaning, his study of the material lacks sufficient thoroughness.
(E) Dickinson’s editors, including Johnson, have failed to deal adequately with the problem of deciphering Dickinson’s handwritten manuscripts.
Tricky question.
A is out because of "guilt."
E is out b/c of " failed"
Note how B is mildly stated.

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Re: Johnson

by amazonviper » Thu Jul 16, 2009 4:28 am
dumb.doofus wrote:Johnson is on firm ground when he asserts that the early editors of Dickinson’s poetry often distorted her intentions. Yet Johnson’s own, more faithful, text is still guilty of its own forms of distortion. To standardize Dickinson’s often indecipherable handwritten punctuation by the use of the dash is to render permanent a casual mode of poetic phrasing that Dickinson surely never expected to see in print. It implies that Dickinson chose the dash as her typical mark of punctuation when, in fact, she apparently never made any definitive choice at all.
Which of the following best summarizes the author’s main point?

(A) Although Johnson is right in criticizing Dickinson’s early editors for their distortion of her work, his own text is guilty of equally serious distortions.
(B) Johnson’s use of the dash in his text of Dickinson’s poetry misleads readers about the poet’s intentions.
(C) Because Dickinson never expected her poetry to be published, virtually any attempt at editing it must run counter to her intentions.
(D) Although Johnson’s attempt to produce a more faithful text of Dickinson’s poetry is well-meaning, his study of the material lacks sufficient thoroughness.
(E) Dickinson’s editors, including Johnson, have failed to deal adequately with the problem of deciphering Dickinson’s handwritten manuscripts.
IMO B.
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IMO C

by hariharakarthi » Thu Jul 16, 2009 5:08 am
Main point of the Arg:

Hence, it is C.

OA Please...