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Film scholars agree

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Film scholars agree

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Source: MGMAT

Film scholars agree that Hollywood portrayals of America at war follow a cyclical pattern. During and immediately after a conflict, important films trumpet glory and sacrifice. Ten to fifteen years later, questioning and sometimes pacifistic movies about the conflict dominate. In the late 1960’s, “the raging bulls” of Hollywood--the young trendsetters rising to prominence--proclaimed this pattern obsolete. However, the passage of time has demonstrated this cultural pattern to be more resilient than it seemed in those days of social change.

Throughout the majority of the last century, evidence of the cyclical portrayal of war in film abounds. After America declared war against Germany during World War I, the still infant film industry glorified the fight against “the Hun.” By the early 1930's, major releases had changed their tone; for example, All Quiet on the Western Front put forth an anti-war message by displaying the horrors of combat. After World War II began, the industry shifted gears. Suddenly, important pictures again portrayed glories and courage without the questioning or despair. For example, Guadalcanal Diary, produced during the war, showed “the ultimate sacrifice” as a noble and undoubted good. Once again, though, by 1957, films such as The Bridge on the River Kwai won awards for depicting the moral confusion of war.

Those who later declared this pattern dead based their conviction on their hearts rather than their minds. During the Vietnam War, the only major film about that conflict was The Green Berets, starring John Wayne and far closer in tone to Guadalcanal Diary than to The Bridge on the River Kwai. Similarly, years went by before more complex visions of war, such as Apocalypse Now, and then Platoon, emerged.

While today’s film industry is more diverse and its audience more culturally fragmented, this cycle largely continues. Jarhead, a layered depiction of the first gulf war, premiered more than ten years after that conflict. Further evidence of this pattern can be seen in the release of Apocalypse Now Redux, which contained additional footage that the producers originally thought would repel audiences. Thus, the famous aphorism “The more things change, the more they stay the same” certainly applies to this aspect of the film industry.

Q1
What is the main point made by the author?

A: Hollywood has never fully supported America’s armed conflicts.
B: In the last century, the film industry has become more culturally diverse.
C: An established cultural pattern is more durable than was thought during a time of social upheaval.
D: The film industry has only supported American military efforts during the actual conflict.
E: Cyclical patterns determine the type of big budget films produced by Hollywood more than individuals do.

OA: C

Q2
Which one of the following does the author believe is true about The Bridge on the River Kwai?

A: It deserved the awards that it won.
B: It is a more intelligent and well-crafted movie than The Green Berets.
C: It was the first movie to portray the moral confusion of war.
D: Its portrayal of war is more ambivalent than that in Guadalcanal Diary.
E: It was more financially successful than any war movie that came before it.

OA: D

Q3
The passage implies that the combat depicted in All Quiet on the Western Front least resembles the depiction of combat in which of the following?

A: Jarhead
B: Apocalypse Now
C: The Bridge on the River Kwai
D: Platoon
E: Guadalcanal Diary

OA: E

Q4
According to the passage, Apocalypse Now Redux differed from Apocalypse Now in which of the following ways?

A. The added footage made it less appealing to a more culturally diverse audience.
B. The added footage made its portrayal of war less glorified and more ambiguous.
C. The added footage made its portrayal of war less harsh and more glorified.
D. The added footage made it more similar in tone to other war movies.
E. The removed footage made its portrayal of war less glorified and less appealing.

OA: B

Please explain in easy way. I am facing difficulty to solve it.

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1c

last sentence of the last para gives me the answer as C

2d
2nd para last sentence gives the answer for this question.
the word ambivalent maans "Uncertainty or indecisiveness as to which course to follow"

3e
All Quiet on the Western Front put forth an anti-war message by displaying the horrors of combat
A: Jarhead(also showed the pattern where people denounced war )
B: Apocalypse Now(more complex visions of war )
C: The Bridge on the River Kwai(depicting the moral confusion of war. )
D: Platoon(more complex visions of war )
E: Guadalcana-l Diary (showed “the ultimate sacrifice” as a noble and undoubted good )

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akhp77 wrote:
Source: MGMAT

Film scholars agree that Hollywood portrayals of America at war follow a cyclical pattern. During and immediately after a conflict, important films trumpet glory and sacrifice. Ten to fifteen years later, questioning and sometimes pacifistic movies about the conflict dominate. In the late 1960’s, “the raging bulls” of Hollywood--the young trendsetters rising to prominence--proclaimed this pattern obsolete. However, the passage of time has demonstrated this cultural pattern to be more resilient than it seemed in those days of social change.

Throughout the majority of the last century, evidence of the cyclical portrayal of war in film abounds. After America declared war against Germany during World War I, the still infant film industry glorified the fight against “the Hun.” By the early 1930's, major releases had changed their tone; for example, All Quiet on the Western Front put forth an anti-war message by displaying the horrors of combat. After World War II began, the industry shifted gears. Suddenly, important pictures again portrayed glories and courage without the questioning or despair. For example, Guadalcanal Diary, produced during the war, showed “the ultimate sacrifice” as a noble and undoubted good. Once again, though, by 1957, films such as The Bridge on the River Kwai won awards for depicting the moral confusion of war.

Those who later declared this pattern dead based their conviction on their hearts rather than their minds. During the Vietnam War, the only major film about that conflict was The Green Berets, starring John Wayne and far closer in tone to Guadalcanal Diary than to The Bridge on the River Kwai. Similarly, years went by before more complex visions of war, such as Apocalypse Now, and then Platoon, emerged.

While today’s film industry is more diverse and its audience more culturally fragmented, this cycle largely continues. Jarhead, a layered depiction of the first gulf war, premiered more than ten years after that conflict. Further evidence of this pattern can be seen in the release of Apocalypse Now Redux, which contained additional footage that the producers originally thought would repel audiences. Thus, the famous aphorism “The more things change, the more they stay the same” certainly applies to this aspect of the film industry.

Q1
What is the main point made by the author?

A: Hollywood has never fully supported America’s armed conflicts.
B: In the last century, the film industry has become more culturally diverse.
C: An established cultural pattern is more durable than was thought during a time of social upheaval.
D: The film industry has only supported American military efforts during the actual conflict.
E: Cyclical patterns determine the type of big budget films produced by Hollywood more than individuals do.

OA: C

.
Prasad Bhai,

Main point mostly comes in the first para or in the end. So look out for the words.

Here ,luckily its very much plain.
{{
However, the passage of time has demonstrated this cultural pattern to be more resilient than it seemed in those days of social change.}}

SO that makes us to pick C directly without any second opinion..!

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Q4
According to the passage, Apocalypse Now Redux differed from Apocalypse Now in which of the following ways?

A. The added footage made it less appealing to a more culturally diverse audience. ----NO, never mentioned so!!

B. The added footage made its portrayal of war less glorified and more ambiguous. HOLD IT{attractive}

C. The added footage made its portrayal of war less harsh and more glorified. ----NO way..it says War is harsh and NOT glorified!!

D. The added footage made it more similar in tone to other war movies.


E. The removed footage made its portrayal of war less glorified and less appealing.


Ok...here it goes like this!

What does Apocalypse Now talks about??? Passage hints that this movie glorifies the wars/conflicts/ .

SO what does Apocalypse Now Redux do?? We understand that the producers have added some footage that "repels" the thought among audiences.

So it means this movie {Apocalypse Now Redux} is a ANTI WAR movie!

B does the work!

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Thanks Guys

I understood all.

1st, 2nd, and 3rd seem to be easy but 4th one difficult to me.

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akhp77 wrote:
Thanks Guys

I understood all.

1st, 2nd, and 3rd seem to be easy but 4th one difficult to me.
I think key to the soln of 4th lies in Para 4 1st line- "While today’s film industry is more diverse and its audience more culturally fragmented"

Also it is critical to note that both Apocalypse Now & Apocalypse Now Redux although have the same theme, meaning both underscore the complex visions of War, but "today's more diverse film industry and culturally fragmented audience" motivated producers to add footage that was left in cutting room,as the footage would have repelled audience of earlier generation. Moreover return of same movie with the added footage does the same thing " less glorified and more ambiguous" but with a relatively stronger emphasis on both.

Thus answer is "B", but certainly not because the two movie's have themes that are 180 degrees apart.

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