Demanding vs who demanded

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Demanding vs who demanded

by neeti2711 » Fri Jun 02, 2017 5:59 am
In one of the most surprising victories in World War I, the newly-formed Soviet communist state was routed by the Polish General, Jozef Pilsudski, demanding that it should push back its borders east of Vilnius.

(A) demanding that it should
(B) demanding it to
(C) and their demand to
(D) who demanded that it
(E) who demanded them to

OA: D

Is B incorrect because the word "demand" requires "that" (command subjunctive) and B violates this rule?!

Source: Manhattan Review

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by Ali Tariq » Fri Jun 02, 2017 6:39 am
neeti2711 wrote:
Is B incorrect because the word "demand" requires "that" (command subjunctive) and B violates this rule?!

Source: Manhattan Review
Yes!
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by gmat_hunt » Sat Jun 03, 2017 12:05 am
neeti2711 wrote:In one of the most surprising victories in World War I, the newly-formed Soviet communist state was routed by the Polish General, Jozef Pilsudski, demanding that it should push back its borders east of Vilnius.

(A) demanding that it should
(B) demanding it to
(C) and their demand to
(D) who demanded that it
(E) who demanded them to

OA: D

Is B incorrect because the word "demand" requires "that" (command subjunctive) and B violates this rule?!

Source: Manhattan Review
Nope, B is wrong for two reasons:
Let's know the rule first:
1. COMMA+VERB-ING:
When we use "CLAUSE+COMMA+VERB-ING", the verb-ing modifies the SUBJECT of the previous clause.
Example:
The author helped the poor, giving them money.
=> Giving modifies "The author". Who gave money to the poor? The author.
Now, form B, as it is, meant "Soviet communist state demand it(state)....". Does it make sense? --> State is demanding itself.
2. The intended meaning of the sentence is "Pilsudski demanded it..."; therefore, to refer to the person, we need to use
relative pronoun "WHO" and then add the verb. Here Pilsudski is the antecedent and who is the relative pronoun.
B violates this rule as well.
hope it helps.

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by Ali Tariq » Sat Jun 03, 2017 5:18 am
gmat_hunt wrote:
Let's know the rule first:
1. COMMA+VERB-ING:
When we use "CLAUSE+COMMA+VERB-ING", the verb-ing modifies the SUBJECT of the previous clause.
Example:
The author helped the poor, giving them money.
=> Giving modifies "The author". Who gave money to the poor? The author.
Now, form B, as it is, meant "Soviet communist state demand it(state)....". Does it make sense? --> State is demanding itself.
In this particular SC, this is not at all a decision point since a case can be made that B is not COMMA+VERB-ING but NOUN VERB-ING;
i.e, COMMA is a part of , Jozef Pilsudski construction.
B)Soviet communist state was routed by the Polish General, Jozef Pilsudski, demanding it to push back its borders east of Vilnius.

gmat_hunt wrote:
2. The intended meaning of the sentence is "Pilsudski demanded it..."; therefore, to refer to the person, we need to use
relative pronoun "WHO" and then add the verb. Here Pilsudski is the antecedent and who is the relative pronoun.
B violates this rule as well.
hope it helps.
who+ verb is not the only way to refer to a person( modify a person).
It is perfectly acceptable to modify a person with Verbing.
However, that and which cannot modify a person.

Only viable reason to eliminate B is that demand cannot take infinitive.
There exist bossy words that can take both subjunctive and infinitive.
order is one such bossy word that can take both infinitive and subjunctive.
demand, however, cannot.
Thus, for those bossy words that can take both, we should look for some other decision point and demand is not one of those bossy words.
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by ceilidh.erickson » Mon Jun 12, 2017 10:02 am
This question very closely plagiarizes an Official question, SC #55 in Verbal Review 1st Edition:
In one of the most stunning reversals in the history of marketing, the Coca-Cola company in July 1985 yielded to thousands of irate consumers demanding that it should bring back the original Coke formula.

(A) demanding that it should
(B) demanding it to
(C) and their demand to
(D) who demanded that it
(E) who demanded it to
This is not the way that an ethical test prep company should behave.

Please also note that Manhattan Review is *not* to be confused with Manhattan Prep, which was previously know as Manhattan GMAT, and often still referred to as MGMAT.
Ceilidh Erickson
EdM in Mind, Brain, and Education
Harvard Graduate School of Education

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by neeti2711 » Mon Jun 12, 2017 10:54 pm
Ceilidh,

Thank you for your response!

The questions in Manhattan Review are a bit different from questions in other prep materials and don't seem very authentic.