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Best way to utilise LSAT CR Questions

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Best way to utilise LSAT CR Questions

by AbhiJ » Thu Jan 19, 2012 2:36 am
There are two ways to practise LSAT questions:

1.) Use LSAT questions divided by type - Strengthen, Weaken, Assumption, Paradox, Method of Reasoning. Some companies sell questions bundled by type.

Pros: You are sure that you will not be wasting time on non GMAT type LSAT questions.
Cons: You would already be aware of the question type and it would a one dimensonal review.

2.) Use LSAT questions by Tests.

Pros: A mixed review of questions where you will have to identify the question type, leading to a mixed prepration.
Cons: You may be wasting time on questions that would never be asked on the GMAT.
The counter argument against cons is that CR questions - are about understanding the premise and conclusion, visualising the argument and attacking it, which is true for all question types.

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by David@VeritasPrep » Thu Jan 19, 2012 2:05 pm
Good posting!

I agree with most of what you have said here.

Of course if you are using option #2 you do not have to waste time, you can also simply skip those questions that do not feel like anything that you know from studying GMAT questions. For example, on the LSAT you have some questions that ask you to find that answer that would prove the conclusion to be true. This is not found on the GMAT on the GMAT we have only strengthen and assumption, not "sufficient to prove the conclusion true." so you could just skip this question type if you get it.

A third option would be to do LSAT tests, but only really focus on the first 16 questions. Questions 17 to the end (usually 25 or 26) are often much harder than what is on the GMAT. So you could really go for the first 16, with the exception of anything that would not be on the GMAT at all and then you could just take 17 on as being fun and if you get some right then great!

You may have already seen this, but here is a link to my Using LSAT to study CR on the GMAT posting. https://www.beatthegmat.com/lsat-to-stud ... 15-15.html
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by chieftang » Thu Jan 19, 2012 3:21 pm
AbhiJ wrote: Cons: You may be wasting time on questions that would never be asked on the GMAT.
I think that sums it up for me. Not a big fan of using non-GMAT questions to study for the GMAT. In studying for GMAT-style questions, you should be able to pick up the concepts tested on the GMAT. And that's what matters.

In my personal opinion.

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by avik.ch » Fri Jan 20, 2012 9:41 pm
AbhiJ wrote:There are two ways to practise LSAT questions:

1.) Use LSAT questions divided by type - Strengthen, Weaken, Assumption, Paradox, Method of Reasoning. Some companies sell questions bundled by type.

Pros: You are sure that you will not be wasting time on non GMAT type LSAT questions.
Cons: You would already be aware of the question type and it would a one dimensonal review.
Do you any source from where I can get this LSAT LR question arranged by topics.

Thank you.

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by AbhiJ » Sat Jan 21, 2012 7:41 am
Search Cambridge LSAT - Grouped by Question Type

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by tigerd » Sat Jan 21, 2012 9:09 pm
AbhiJ wrote:There are two ways to practise LSAT questions:

1.) Use LSAT questions divided by type - Strengthen, Weaken, Assumption, Paradox, Method of Reasoning. Some companies sell questions bundled by type.

Pros: You are sure that you will not be wasting time on non GMAT type LSAT questions.
Cons: You would already be aware of the question type and it would a one dimensonal review.

I actually did this for a significant period before I got any GMAT books.

I don't think the con is a problem at all. If you can't figure out the question type immediately for any given question, then you shouldn't be using LSAT problems to practice for the GMAT in the first place.

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by AbhiJ » Sun Jan 22, 2012 9:32 am
tigerd wrote:
AbhiJ wrote:There are two ways to practise LSAT questions:

1.) Use LSAT questions divided by type - Strengthen, Weaken, Assumption, Paradox, Method of Reasoning. Some companies sell questions bundled by type.

Pros: You are sure that you will not be wasting time on non GMAT type LSAT questions.
Cons: You would already be aware of the question type and it would a one dimensonal review.

I actually did this for a significant period before I got any GMAT books.

I don't think the con is a problem at all. If you can't figure out the question type immediately for any given question, then you shouldn't be using LSAT problems to practice for the GMAT in the first place.
Its not so much about identifying Q type than about being flexible. Think solving 20 PS questions followed by 20 DS problems v/s a attempting typicaL GMAT Quant Section. The situation is severe in CR as the types are more than 2 and you need to flexible and on your toes all the time.