• NEW! FREE Beat The GMAT Quizzes
    NEW! FREE Beat The GMAT Quizzes
    NEW! FREE Beat The GMAT Quizzes
    Hundreds of Questions Highly Detailed Reporting Expert Explanations TAKE A FREE GMAT QUIZ
  • 7 CATs FREE!
    If you earn 100 Forum Points

    Engage in the Beat The GMAT forums to earn
    100 points for $49 worth of Veritas practice GMATs FREE

    Veritas Prep
    VERITAS PRACTICE GMAT EXAMS
    Earn 10 Points Per Post
    Earn 10 Points Per Thanks
    Earn 10 Points Per Upvote
    REDEEM NOW

OG 13 #9

This topic has 5 expert replies and 13 member replies
Goto page Previous

Top Member

Post
GMATGuruNY wrote:
hey_thr67 wrote:
In 1979 lack of rain reduced India's rice production to about 41 million tons, nearly 25 percent less than those of the 1978 harvest.

A: less than those of the 1978 harvest.
B: less than the 1978 harvest.
C: less than 1978.
D: fewer than 1978.
E: less than that of India's 1978 harvest.

OA is B. Why not A ?
In E, that seems to refer to production. Thus, that of India's 1978 harvest implies the PRODUCTION of India's HARVEST - an error of redundancy, since the PRODUCTION and the HARVEST are the same thing. Eliminate E.

C and D each seem to compare the rice production to 1978. The PRODUCTION cannot be compared to a YEAR. Eliminate C and D.

In A, those seems to refer to tons, implying that the TONS of the rice production in 1979 are being compared to the TONS of the 1978 harvest. Not the intended meaning. The intention here is to compare the PRODUCTION in one year to the HARVEST in the other. Eliminate A.

The correct answer is B.

Consider the following analogy.
INCORRECT: This year John's salary increased to 50,000 dollars, 25% more than those of his salary last year.
This sentence is nonsense: the intention clearly is not to compare the DOLLARS of one salary to the DOLLARS of the other but rather to compare one SALARY to the other.
dear GMATGuru,

As you explained before, ''ER adjective' is used with value or numerical data point like the following OG:
Soaring television costs accounted for more than half the spending in the presidential campaign of 1992, a greater proportion than in any previous election.

Why 'production' is not treated as value too like the example above so that we use 'greater' instead of 'less'?

  • +1 Upvote Post
  • Quote
  • Flag

GMAT/MBA Expert

Post
Mo2men wrote:
As you explained before, ''ER adjective' is used with value or numerical data point like the following OG:
Soaring television costs accounted for more than half the spending in the presidential campaign of 1992, a greater proportion than in any previous election.
Here, greater serves to modify not costs but PROPORTION.
Conveyed meaning:
The PROPORTION in the presidential campaign of 1992 was greater than the PROPORTION in any previous election.

Quote:
Why 'production' is not treated as value too like the example above so that we use 'greater' instead of 'less'?
When comparing elements with regard to WEIGHT, we generally use not lower but LESS.
Adam weighs LESS than Bob.
Adam weighs 180 pounds, 30 pounds LESS than Bob
.
The SC above conveys the following meaning:
The 1979 rice production weighed LESS than the 1978 harvest.

_________________
Mitch Hunt
Private Tutor for the GMAT and GRE
GMATGuruNY@gmail.com

If you find one of my posts helpful, please take a moment to click on the "UPVOTE" icon.

Available for tutoring in NYC and long-distance.
For more information, please email me at GMATGuruNY@gmail.com.
Student Review #1
Student Review #2
Student Review #3



Last edited by GMATGuruNY on Sat May 11, 2019 1:19 pm; edited 2 times in total

  • +1 Upvote Post
  • Quote
  • Flag
Free GMAT Practice Test How can you improve your test score if you don't know your baseline score? Take a free online practice exam. Get started on achieving your dream score today! Sign up now.

Top Member

Post
GMATGuruNY wrote:
When comparing elements with regard to WEIGHT, we generally use not lower but LESS.
Adam weighs LESS than Bob.
Adam weighs 180 pounds, 30 pounds LESS than Bob
.
The SC above conveys the following meaning:
The 1979 rice production weighed LESS than the 1978 harvest.
Thanks GMATGuru for you reply.

I'm confused a bit here

1- Can I say that When we compare numbers, and numbers decrease, we use “less.”? For example

The population of Ghana is less than that of New York.
The cost of a night at the Hyatt is less than total cost of a day at Hilton.
The melting point of zinc is less than that of copper.

2- If the above are true, so why is it different than It appears in the following Official question:
Most of the country’s biggest daily newspapers had lower circulation in the six months from October 1995 through March 1996 than in a similar period.

According to your explanation, circulation so, why not taking less? Based on answer, how to differentiate between using 'less' and '...ER adjective?

Thanks

  • +1 Upvote Post
  • Quote
  • Flag

GMAT/MBA Expert

Post
Mo2men wrote:
According to your explanation, circulation so, why not taking less? Based on answer, how to differentiate between using 'less' and '...ER adjective?

Thanks
When a statistic decreases in value, we use lower rather than less.
Incorrect:
The temperature was less in the second experiment than in the first.
Correct:
The temperature was lower in the second experiment than in the first.

Most of the country’s biggest daily newspapers had lower circulation in the six months from October 1995 through March 1996 than in a similar period.
Conveyed meaning:
Here, there was a DECREASE IN THE NUMBER of newspapers in circulation.
Since a statistic -- the number of newspapers in circulation -- decreased in value, the OA correctly states that this statistic was LOWER.

Quote:
The population of Ghana is less than that of New York.
The melting point of zinc is less than that of copper.
Outside the GMAT, you might see comparisons like the two above.
BUT:
To my knowledge, no official SC has ever stated that one population or temperature is less than another.
Incorrect:
Ghana has less population than New York.
Correct:
Ghana has a SMALLER population than New York.

_________________
Mitch Hunt
Private Tutor for the GMAT and GRE
GMATGuruNY@gmail.com

If you find one of my posts helpful, please take a moment to click on the "UPVOTE" icon.

Available for tutoring in NYC and long-distance.
For more information, please email me at GMATGuruNY@gmail.com.
Student Review #1
Student Review #2
Student Review #3

  • +1 Upvote Post
  • Quote
  • Flag
Free GMAT Practice Test How can you improve your test score if you don't know your baseline score? Take a free online practice exam. Get started on achieving your dream score today! Sign up now.
  • EMPOWERgmat Slider
    1 Hour Free
    BEAT THE GMAT EXCLUSIVE

    Available with Beat the GMAT members only code

    MORE DETAILS
    EMPOWERgmat Slider
  • e-gmat Exclusive Offer
    Get 300+ Practice Questions
    25 Video lessons and 6 Webinars for FREE

    Available with Beat the GMAT members only code

    MORE DETAILS
    e-gmat Exclusive Offer
  • Target Test Prep
    5-Day Free Trial
    5-day free, full-access trial TTP Quant

    Available with Beat the GMAT members only code

    MORE DETAILS
    Target Test Prep
  • Economist Test Prep
    Free Trial & Practice Exam
    BEAT THE GMAT EXCLUSIVE

    Available with Beat the GMAT members only code

    MORE DETAILS
    Economist Test Prep
  • Kaplan Test Prep
    Free Practice Test & Review
    How would you score if you took the GMAT

    Available with Beat the GMAT members only code

    MORE DETAILS
    Kaplan Test Prep
  • Varsity Tutors
    Award-winning private GMAT tutoring
    Register now and save up to $200

    Available with Beat the GMAT members only code

    MORE DETAILS
    Varsity Tutors
  • Magoosh
    Magoosh
    Study with Magoosh GMAT prep

    Available with Beat the GMAT members only code

    MORE DETAILS
    Magoosh
  • PrepScholar GMAT
    5 Day FREE Trial
    Study Smarter, Not Harder

    Available with Beat the GMAT members only code

    MORE DETAILS
    PrepScholar GMAT
  • The Princeton Review
    FREE GMAT Exam
    Know how you'd score today for $0

    Available with Beat the GMAT members only code

    MORE DETAILS
    The Princeton Review
  • Veritas Prep
    Free Veritas GMAT Class
    Experience Lesson 1 Live Free

    Available with Beat the GMAT members only code

    MORE DETAILS
    Veritas Prep

Top First Responders*

1 Ian Stewart 57 first replies
2 Brent@GMATPrepNow 31 first replies
3 Jay@ManhattanReview 29 first replies
4 GMATGuruNY 20 first replies
5 ceilidh.erickson 15 first replies
* Only counts replies to topics started in last 30 days
See More Top Beat The GMAT Members

Most Active Experts

1 image description Scott@TargetTestPrep

Target Test Prep

211 posts
2 image description Max@Math Revolution

Math Revolution

88 posts
3 image description Brent@GMATPrepNow

GMAT Prep Now Teacher

70 posts
4 image description Ian Stewart

GMATiX Teacher

65 posts
5 image description GMATGuruNY

The Princeton Review Teacher

39 posts
See More Top Beat The GMAT Experts