Thelonious Monk, who was a jazz pianist and

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Thelonious Monk, who was a jazz pianist and
composer, produced a body of work both rooted
in the
stride-piano tradition of Willie (The Lion) Smith and
Duke Ellington, yet in many ways he stood apart from
the mainstream jazz repertory.
(A) Thelonious Monk, who was a jazz pianist and
composer, produced a body of work both rooted
(B) Thelonious Monk, the jazz pianist and composer,
produced a body of work that was rooted both
(C) Jazz pianist and composer Thelonious Monk,
who produced a body of work rooted
(D) Jazz pianist and composer Thelonious Monk
produced a body of work that was rooted
(E) Jazz pianist and composer Thelonious Monk
produced a body of work rooted both


OA D

Ron has nicely explained it at,

https://www.manhattangmat.com/forums/s-c ... t7519.html

Now since, I already said that Ron has nicely described it, I have no question grammar wise.

But I really dont understand the construction of the sentence, especially work both rooted.

Can some help me understand it.
Regards,

Pranay

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by atulmangal » Fri Apr 22, 2011 3:49 am
bubbliiiiiiii wrote:Thelonious Monk, who was a jazz pianist and composer, produced a body of work both rooted in the stride-piano tradition of Willie (The Lion) Smith and Duke Ellington, yet in many ways he stood apart from the mainstream jazz repertory.

(A) Thelonious Monk, who was a jazz pianist and composer, produced a body of work both rooted
(B) Thelonious Monk, the jazz pianist and composer,produced a body of work that was rooted both
(C) Jazz pianist and composer Thelonious Monk, who produced a body of work rooted
(D) Jazz pianist and composer Thelonious Monk produced a body of work that was rooted
(E) Jazz pianist and composer Thelonious Monk produced a body of work rooted both


OA D
I'm not sure what your doubt is...but in the all the options containing word "both" violates the idiom...Both X and Y...since Y is in the non-underlined portion so its rigid...
Y = Duke Ellington----> a noun

that means, X must be a noun, but

In Op A:-- X = rooted = verb hence not parallel to Y, a noun
In Op B:-- X = in the stride-piano = a prepositional phrase hence not parallel to Y, a noun
In Op E:-- X = in the stride-piano = a prepositional phrase hence not parallel to Y, a noun

In Op B, Op E, if the non-underlined would be "in Y" then that idiom gonna be correct.

Now, look at Op C, its an interesting one...

Jazz pianist and composer Thelonious Monk, who produced a body of work rooted in the stride-piano tradition of Willie (The Lion) Smith and Duke Ellington , yet in many ways he stood apart from the mainstream jazz repertory.

The green colored one is a relative clause...now a relative clause can not be an independent clause that means we need an IC to make a complete sentence but if you see the red one which supposed to be the main clause..u see it lacks a verb. the "Jazz pianist and composer Thelonious Monk" the main subject needs a verb a verb which is missing hence its a fragment.

Left with Op D

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by qazi11 » Mon Jan 02, 2017 8:23 pm
@atulmangal. Doesn't the composition jazz pianist and composer Thelonious Monk," make it sound like two different people.