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Microwave clothes

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Microwave clothes

by YHPARK » Fri Oct 16, 2009 3:49 am
Here is an one complicated CR questions.

An experimental microwave clothes dryer heats neither air nor cloth. Rather, it heats water on clothes, thereby saving electricity and protecting delicate fibers by operating at a lower temperature. Microwaves are waves that usually heat metal objects, but developers of a microwave dryer are perfecting a process that will prevent thin metal objects such as hairpins from heating up and burning clothes.
Which of the following, if true, most strongly indicates that the process, when perfected, will be insufficient to make the dryer readily marketable?
(A) Metal snap fasteners on clothes that are commonly put into drying machines are about the same thickness as most hairpins.
(B) Many clothes that are currently placed into mechanical dryers are not placed there along with hairpins or other thin metal objects.
(C) The experimental microwave dryer uses more electricity than future, improved models would be expected to use.
(D) Drying clothes with the process would not cause more shrinkage than the currently used mechanical drying process causes.
(E) Many clothes that are frequently machine-dried by prospective customers incorporate thick metal parts such as decorative brass studs or buttons.

OA isE
why D is not correct!

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by GMATBootcamp » Fri Oct 16, 2009 9:45 am
Break the argument down into its logical components:

Evidence


- experimental microwave not heat air or cloth -> heats water
- save electricity and protect fibers -> lower operating temp
- microwaves heat metal objects
- new process prevent thin metal objects from burning clothes


Conclusion


The new process will be insufficient.


A) Eliminate because its outside the scope. The passage isn't asking for the thickness of hairpins or metal fasteners
C) Eliminate, using less energy is actually a bonus, so this would strengthen the argument.
D) Eliminate because its outside the scope of the argument. The passage does not mention clothing shrinkage.


Looking at answer B, if clothes are not dried with thin metal objects then developers don't have to worry about preventing metal objects from heating up and burning clothes. This actually strengthens the argument and makes the new technology more desirable. Eliminate

In answer E, the new technology prevents thin metal objects from burning clothes. But if the majority of clothing incorporates thick metal objects, then clothing will still be damaged when dried with the new equipment. This explains why the new process will not be readily marketable. Answer should be E
Paul

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by Maciek » Sat Aug 14, 2010 7:24 am
GMATBootcamp wrote:Break the argument down into its logical components:

Evidence


- experimental microwave not heat air or cloth -> heats water
- save electricity and protect fibers -> lower operating temp
- microwaves heat metal objects
- new process prevent thin metal objects from burning clothes


Conclusion


The new process will be insufficient.


A) Eliminate because its outside the scope. The passage isn't asking for the thickness of hairpins or metal fasteners
C) Eliminate, using less energy is actually a bonus, so this would strengthen the argument.
D) Eliminate because its outside the scope of the argument. The passage does not mention clothing shrinkage.


Looking at answer B, if clothes are not dried with thin metal objects then developers don't have to worry about preventing metal objects from heating up and burning clothes. This actually strengthens the argument and makes the new technology more desirable. Eliminate

In answer E, the new technology prevents thin metal objects from burning clothes. But if the majority of clothing incorporates thick metal objects, then clothing will still be damaged when dried with the new equipment. This explains why the new process will not be readily marketable. Answer should be E
Hi,

I do not agree with above presented reasoning because it omits relevant evidence. Correct me if I am wrong.

Evidence:
- experimental microwave not heat air or cloth -> heats water
- the process saves electricity and protect fibers by operating at a lower temperature
- microwaves usually heat metal objects
- new process prevent thin metal objects from heating up and burning clothes

In my opinion answer E does not indicate most strongly that the process, when perfected, will be insufficient to make the dryer readily marketable because it still saves elecricity and protect fibers. And new technology will prevent thick metal parts such as decorative brass studs or buttons from heating up and burning clothes.

Answer C is the best because using less energy could allow microwave clothes dryer to be readily marketable. And answer C disables this opportunity: "The experimental microwave dryer uses more electricity than future, improved models would be expected to use. " so the process, when perfected, will be insufficient to make the dryer readily marketable.

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by FightWithGMAT » Sat Aug 14, 2010 2:18 pm
YHPARK wrote:Here is an one complicated CR questions.

An experimental microwave clothes dryer heats neither air nor cloth. Rather, it heats water on clothes, thereby saving electricity and protecting delicate fibers by operating at a lower temperature. Microwaves are waves that usually heat metal objects, but developers of a microwave dryer are perfecting a process that will prevent thin metal objects such as hairpins from heating up and burning clothes.
Which of the following, if true, most strongly indicates that the process, when perfected, will be insufficient to make the dryer readily marketable?
(A) Metal snap fasteners on clothes that are commonly put into drying machines are about the same thickness as most hairpins.
(B) Many clothes that are currently placed into mechanical dryers are not placed there along with hairpins or other thin metal objects.
(C) The experimental microwave dryer uses more electricity than future, improved models would be expected to use.
(D) Drying clothes with the process would not cause more shrinkage than the currently used mechanical drying process causes.
(E) Many clothes that are frequently machine-dried by prospective customers incorporate thick metal parts such as decorative brass studs or buttons.

OA isE
why D is not correct!
Good question though!!

Developers are perfecting a process for THIN metal objects. Are they working on to solve the issues with THICK metal things???? NO

E says that THICK metal parts are likely to be parts of clothes for which the microwave is intended.

JUST a word "THICK" creates the difference. It is very difficult to realize this word on the first reading.

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by srt420 » Thu Jan 19, 2012 9:30 pm
Here in this question the issue is Metal object and the whole argument depends clearly on the safety due to heating those metal object.
Only amswer choice E describe the attributable relation between the strengthor Weakness of Argument ie on Metal . Therefore, E is the best answer that address the issue clearly.
So E is the best although not perfect.

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by ArunangsuSahu » Fri Jan 20, 2012 12:19 pm
Actually the Choice should boil down between (B) and (E)

Reason behind (B) as in correct:

CR Question Tells the process as "INSUFFICIENT. But (B) tells that hair pins will not be there. So can not be INSUFFICIENT
(E) tells that the clothes will come with Thick Metal.. which makes "INSUFFICIENT" as true

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by ronnie1985 » Fri Jan 20, 2012 8:50 pm
WHY (C) IS INCORRECT?
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by patanjali.purpose » Sat Jan 21, 2012 1:03 am
ronnie1985 wrote:WHY (C) IS INCORRECT?
Trick is in to read the question stem clearly:

Which of the following, if true, most strongly indicates that the process, when perfected, will be insufficient to make the dryer readily marketable?

It means author is wanting us to pick a choice that will weaken the claim that the new microwave is readily markedtable IN FUTURE (ie when the experimental is perfected). C actually confirms that the future microwave will use lesser electricity than experimental microwave ie the future microwave will be better. So, in a way, C strengthens.

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by Sharma_Gaurav » Sat Jan 21, 2012 4:37 am
clearly the answer is E as when the microwave models are perfected ( for use wit chothes having thin metal obkjects) they will not prove useful for THICK metal objects clothes.
Only problem is that i took 2 min an d54 seconds to answer inspite of 2 mintues
need to speed up

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by pareekbharat86 » Fri Dec 06, 2013 11:08 pm
This is a kind of CR ques that can easily numb your mind if you have to solve it in under 2 mins ;-)
Thanks,
Bharat.