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Health care workers

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Health care workers

by augusto » Wed Dec 10, 2008 12:38 pm
Like other health care workers, the insurance rates charged dentists have skyrocketed in recent years

a) ...
b) Like with other health care workers, insurance of dentists
c) As with health care workers, dentists' insurance rates
d) As with the insurance of other health care workers, dentists
e) Like those charged other health care workers, dentists' insurance rates

OA: E

Can someone explain this question a bit? I really don't like the OA at all.

Thanks,
Augusto

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Re: Health care workers

by iamcste » Wed Dec 10, 2008 1:51 pm
augusto wrote:Like other health care workers, the insurance rates charged dentists have skyrocketed in recent years

a) ...
b) Like with other health care workers, insurance of dentists
c) As with health care workers, dentists' insurance rates
d) As with the insurance of other health care workers, dentists
e) Like those charged other health care workers, dentists' insurance rates

OA: E

Can someone explain this question a bit? I really don't like the OA at all.

Thanks,

Augusto
Theme: Comparison and idiomatic expressions

First of all, "rates" are compared for comparison of nouns, we use "Like"

so eliminate options with "as" ( C and D)

Like X, Y is idiomatic

X and Y must be grammtically and logically cmparable

A: Insurance rate charged dentisit make comparison akward. Eliminate. T

( This compares rate of other workers with dentist and sound as if "dentists" will skyrocket)

B: Insurance and health workers ar compared.Eliminate ( Also you can see "rates" missing)

In E, "those" referred to "insurance rates"

hence "insurance rates charged by other health workers" are compared with" insurance rates" charged by Dentist

E sets a grammatically and logically parallel comparison

Choose E

Iamcste

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by ronniecoleman » Wed Dec 10, 2008 9:31 pm
Although IMO E

But does the option really makes sense...

Source ?
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by brb588 » Thu Dec 11, 2008 8:51 am
It makes complete sense, and iamcste explained it well.

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by augusto » Thu Dec 11, 2008 11:20 pm
The question is from Kaplan, taken from the CD bundled with Premier 2008.

raunekk, thanks for the link to the other post! I'm not going to resurrect the other thread, because this one is easier to search for.

I have the same doubt as someone put on the other thread... quoting:
so if I substitute those by rates, the sentence becomes

"Like the rates charged healthcare workers, "


That still seems incorrect without a preposition.

Like the taxes charged in Texas, seems correct to me.

Like the taxes charged Texas,
doesnt sound correct to me. seems like taxes are doing the actions of charging Texas.

Can the preposition be implied ?
Again, can the preposition be implied ?

Thanks guys!