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Hi All. My name is Mohit, and I recently scored 750 on the GMAT (Q51,V40,IR8,AWA6).

I have personally experienced that getting a 700+ score on the GMAT can be very simple only if 4 things are appropriately taken care of.
GMAT has been unnecessarily complicated, and as with anything in the technological age, has seen much pomp and show.
Marketing is taking precedence over matter and quality. I took some guidance in the beginning and got 710. Then for 3 months I worked on my own, paying attention to nuances of the GMAT and improved to 750.

The 4 things that you should take care of are:

1. Strong basics and appropriate practice.

2. Giving a few mocks before the real exam.

3. Preparing an examination strategy

4. Working upon your nerves so that all that effort does not go waste.

As you can see, 2 points are for the all the knowledge you acquire, and 2 points are for the strategy and execution.
Well, that should also be the weightage you should give to these two parts.

Before we go on to discuss these 4 points, I would like to point out few factors that result in an unnecessary struggle and a low score.

They are:

1. Most institutes have a mediocre faculty, and the way you prepare for the GMAT the first time determines your basics. It is very difficult to unlearn some of the trash you have acquired. I will not take names, but I have seen a lot of so called reputed institutes having poor faculty.

2. Preparation is not targeted. Every person has different needs and in a class of multiple students, there is more time lost and less of actual learning takes place. Students feel that they are completing the course, but if you ask me, only 20% of the time actually adds value to an individual.

3. Over practice / Under practice: Both are harmful. Everybody would agree with the under practice part, but over practice! Yes, it is very important that your mind is all the time not cluttered with preparation. GMAT is not rote learning, and your mind will work the best only when it is not over-loaded. You should devote time in solving targeted questions.

4. Too much of time waste discussing with people who themselves have no idea. This includes wasting time on forums, with friends after class etc. Instead, you should focus on seeking guidance from a qualified spurce, and spending some time with yourself to reflect on your strengths, weaknesses, and approaches. Remember, we don't want GMAT preparation to be years of an experience, or a hobby that we enjoy, but to do with it in a few months.

Now let's come back to those 4 points we talked about in the beginning.

1. Without strong basics, forget 700+. Yes, I am being very straight. You may practise 5 hours a day, and solve thousands of questions, you won't make it. Because, GMAT will throw up something new, and all those short-cuts and silly methods taught to you for specific kinds of questions will fall flat. Therefore, it is very necessary to do some background search before you land up in an institute or with a faculty.

2. Giving mocks helps you know of your strengths, weaknesses, time management, and shows you the reality. This stage should be after you have completed atleast 50% of the syllabus. You should attempt GMAC mocks to get the real picture, and some harder mocks so that your preparation is 10% more than required. With stabilisation in the score above 700 should you book your date so that you are comfortable, and don't panic as is the case when you have booked a date but the mocks reflect a poor score.

3. Devising an examination strategy is important to play it smart, and maximise your score. This is very individual specific, and one should carve out his own strategy, after reflecting on the mocks. Just to give you an example, many big brands ask you to devote more time to the initial questions, and lesser for the latter ones. Well, that may work if say, you want a 48 in quant, but if you want a 50 or 51, I don't see how that would make sense. When you are on your way to 51, the difficulty of the questions reaches the sky in the latter part of the exam, and you cant solve those questions in 1 minute, when for the initial easy questions you had taken more than 2 minutes. My take is solve all questions as soon as it is possible, according to the difficulty level. With this strategy, I had nearly 15 minutes for the last 3-4 questions in quant.

4. What distinguishes a 700 from a 750 is how well you can control your nerves. Exam time is anxiety time for most, and it is difficult to give one's best. Without this, all that preparation can get you around 700 but for that final push, you need to have control over thoughts and emotions during those crucial hours. I am surprised how this crucial factor has been neglected by the students and the trainers. In this regard, Yoga and meditation can work wonders to an unimaginable extent. Maintaining the focus for almost 4 hours, not getting burnt out, evading the delusions midway that I have flunked it are crucial. I have been doing Yoga since 10 years, and those seeking guidance on this front can get in touch with me via email, which I have mentioned in the end.


I think much has been already been talked about the good material that is available today, both online and offline, so I won't go into that.

Still, if somebody is inquisitive, and wants my personalised guidance/mentorship in anything related to GMAT, feel free to drop a mail at : [email protected]

I am also providing personalised coaching to those who so desire, and are willing to give in their best.

I would be posting regular updates on my blog: www.theseekingdesire.blogspot.com

"The past cannot be changed, the future is yet in your hands"

Junior | Next Rank: 30 Posts
Posts: 11
Joined: 10 Dec 2018
Followed by:1 members

by JWparker1 » Tue Dec 11, 2018 10:34 pm
theseekingsoul wrote:Hi All. My name is Mohit, and I recently scored 750 on the GMAT (Q51,V40,IR8,AWA6).

I have personally experienced that getting a 700+ score on the GMAT can be very simple only if 4 things are appropriately taken care of.
GMAT has been unnecessarily complicated, and as with anything in the technological age, has seen much pomp and show.
Marketing is taking precedence over matter and quality. I took some guidance in the beginning and got 710. Then for 3 months I worked on my own, paying attention to nuances of the GMAT and improved to 750.

The 4 things that you should take care of are:

1. Strong basics and appropriate practice.

2. Giving a few mocks before the real exam.

3. Preparing an examination strategy

4. Working upon your nerves so that all that effort does not go waste.

As you can see, 2 points are for the all the knowledge you acquire, and 2 points are for the strategy and execution.
Well, that should also be the weightage you should give to these two parts.

Before we go on to discuss these 4 points, I would like to point out few factors that result in an unnecessary struggle and a low score.

They are:

1. Most institutes have a mediocre faculty, and the way you prepare for the GMAT the first time determines your basics. It is very difficult to unlearn some of the trash you have acquired. I will not take names, but I have seen a lot of so called reputed institutes having poor faculty.

2. Preparation is not targeted. Every person has different needs and in a class of multiple students, there is more time lost and less of actual learning takes place. Students feel that they are completing the course, but if you ask me, only 20% of the time actually adds value to an individual.

3. Over practice / Under practice: Both are harmful. Everybody would agree with the under practice part, but over practice! Yes, it is very important that your mind is all the time not cluttered with preparation. GMAT is not rote learning, and your mind will work the best only when it is not over-loaded. You should devote time in solving targeted questions.

4. Too much of time waste discussing with people who themselves have no idea. This includes wasting time on forums, with friends after class etc. Instead, you should focus on seeking guidance from a qualified spurce, and spending some time with yourself to reflect on your strengths, weaknesses, and approaches. Remember, we don't want GMAT preparation to be years of an experience, or a hobby that we enjoy, but to do with it in a few months.

Now let's come back to those 4 points we talked about in the beginning.

1. Without strong basics, forget 700+. Yes, I am being very straight. You may practise 5 hours a day, and solve thousands of questions, you won't make it. Because, GMAT will throw up something new, and all those short-cuts and silly methods taught to you for specific kinds of questions will fall flat. Therefore, it is very necessary to do some background search before you land up in an institute or with a faculty.

2. Giving mocks helps you know of your strengths, weaknesses, time management, and shows you the reality. This stage should be after you have completed atleast 50% of the syllabus. You should attempt GMAC mocks to get the real picture, and some harder mocks so that your preparation is 10% more than required. With stabilisation in the score above 700 should you book your date so that you are comfortable, and don't panic as is the case when you have booked a date but the mocks reflect a poor score.

3. Devising an examination strategy is important to play it smart, and maximise your score. This is very individual specific, and one should carve out his own strategy, after reflecting on the mocks. Just to give you an example, many big brands ask you to devote more time to the initial questions, and lesser for the latter ones. Well, that may work if say, you want a 48 in quant, but if you want a 50 or 51, I don't see how that would make sense. When you are on your way to 51, the difficulty of the questions reaches the sky in the latter part of the exam, and you cant solve those questions in 1 minute, when for the initial easy questions you had taken more than 2 minutes. My take is solve all questions as soon as it is possible, according to the difficulty level. With this strategy, I had nearly 15 minutes for the last 3-4 questions in quant.

4. What distinguishes a 700 from a 750 is how well you can control your nerves. Exam time is anxiety time for most, and it is difficult to give one's best. Without this, all that preparation can get you around 700 but for that final push, you need to have control over thoughts and emotions during those crucial hours. I am surprised how this crucial factor has been neglected by the students and the trainers. In this regard, Yoga and meditation can work wonders to an unimaginable extent. Maintaining the focus for almost 4 hours, not getting burnt out, evading the delusions midway that I have flunked it are crucial. I have been doing Yoga since 10 years, and those seeking guidance on this front can get in touch with me via email, which I have mentioned in the end.


I think much has been already been talked about the good material that is available today, both online and offline, so I won't go into that.

Still, if somebody is inquisitive, and wants my personalised guidance/mentorship in anything related to GMAT, feel free to drop a mail at : [email protected]

I am also providing personalised coaching to those who so desire, and are willing to give in their best.

I would be posting regular updates on my blog: www.theseekingdesire.blogspot.com

"The past cannot be changed, the future is yet in your hands"
Hi Mohit,

I'm just starting my prep. Congrats on your score. I will reach out to you on gmail for guidance.

Thank You