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OG - SC Question 86

This topic has 1 expert reply and 4 member replies
Mission2012 Master | Next Rank: 500 Posts
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OG - SC Question 86

Post Wed Jul 24, 2013 10:36 am
Elapsed Time: 00:00
  • Lap #[LAPCOUNT] ([LAPTIME])
    In 2000, a mere two dozen products accounted for half the increase in spending on prescription drugs, a phenomenon that is explained not just because of more expensive drugs but by the fact that doctors are writing many more prescriptions for higher-cost drugs.
    A. a phenomenon that is explained not just because of more expensive drugs but by the fact that doctors are writing
    B. a phenomenon that is explained not just by the fact that drugs are becoming more expensive but also by the fact that doctors are writing
    C. a phenomenon occurring not just because of drugs that are becoming more expensive but because of doctors having also written
    D. which occurred not just because drugs are becoming more expensive but doctors are also writing
    E. which occurred not just because of more expensive drugs but because doctors have also written

    Can someone explain me what is wrong with option C

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    Post Wed Jul 24, 2013 6:26 pm
    Hi Mission2012,

    In answer C, there are a couple of problems:

    1) The two phrases aren't parallel: "drugs that ARE BECOMING more expensive"...."doctors HAVING also written." The verb phrases don't match.
    2) The word "also" is redundant.

    The phrases need to be parallel and we have to avoid any redundancy. The correct answer is B.

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    Thanked by: freyesinsb
    Post Thu Jul 25, 2013 2:40 pm
    Mission2012 wrote:
    C. a phenomenon occurring not just because of drugs that are becoming more expensive but because of doctors having also written

    Can someone explain me what is wrong with option C
    not just because of drugs but because of doctors.
    Not the intended meaning.
    The phenomenon is occurring not because of the drugs and the doctors themselves but because of what the drugs and the doctors are DOING.
    not just is the equivalent of not only and must be followed by but also.

    doctors having also written.
    NOUN + HAVING + past participle is always incorrect.
    also is misplaced: here, it must immediately follow but to form the idiom not just X but also Y.

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    Thanked by: Alex_Ivanov, chickenwings
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    Alex_Ivanov Newbie | Next Rank: 10 Posts Default Avatar
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    Post Fri Aug 02, 2013 7:43 pm
    Great explanation Mitch!

    sinsofgmat Junior | Next Rank: 30 Posts
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    Post Sat Jun 14, 2014 12:42 pm
    Mission2012 wrote:
    In 2000, a mere two dozen products accounted for half the increase in spending on prescription drugs, a phenomenon that is explained not just because of more expensive drugs but by the fact that doctors are writing many more prescriptions for higher-cost drugs.
    A. a phenomenon that is explained not just because of more expensive drugs but by the fact that doctors are writing
    B. a phenomenon that is explained not just by the fact that drugs are becoming more expensive but also by the fact that doctors are writing
    C. a phenomenon occurring not just because of drugs that are becoming more expensive but because of doctors having also written
    D. which occurred not just because drugs are becoming more expensive but doctors are also writing
    E. which occurred not just because of more expensive drugs but because doctors have also written

    Can someone explain me what is wrong with option C
    In option D and E, isn't there a problem with usage of "which" to refer back the entire clause preceding the comma.

    In option C, isn't the tense of modifier "a phenomenon occurring" incorrect?

    Post Sat Jun 14, 2014 1:41 pm
    Hi sinsofgmat,

    Yes, all of the examples that you noted are errors in their respective answer choices.

    The word "which" can be used as a pronoun, although it's a rarer issue on the GMAT. In this sentence it's improper to use any pronoun in that spot since there's nothing for the pronoun to refer to (so D and E have the same immediate problem).

    Answer C has a couple of problems, including the one that you noted. I was drawn more to the non-parallel elements than to the incorrect use of "occurring."

    GMAT assassins aren't born, they're made,
    Rich

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