• PrepScholar GMAT
    5 Day FREE Trial
    Study Smarter, Not Harder

    Available with Beat the GMAT members only code

    MORE DETAILS
    PrepScholar GMAT
  • Economist Test Prep
    Free Trial & Practice Exam
    BEAT THE GMAT EXCLUSIVE

    Available with Beat the GMAT members only code

    MORE DETAILS
    Economist Test Prep
  • Kaplan Test Prep
    Free Practice Test & Review
    How would you score if you took the GMAT

    Available with Beat the GMAT members only code

    MORE DETAILS
    Kaplan Test Prep
  • e-gmat Exclusive Offer
    Get 300+ Practice Questions
    25 Video lessons and 6 Webinars for FREE

    Available with Beat the GMAT members only code

    MORE DETAILS
    e-gmat Exclusive Offer
  • Veritas Prep
    Free Veritas GMAT Class
    Experience Lesson 1 Live Free

    Available with Beat the GMAT members only code

    MORE DETAILS
    Veritas Prep
  • EMPOWERgmat Slider
    1 Hour Free
    BEAT THE GMAT EXCLUSIVE

    Available with Beat the GMAT members only code

    MORE DETAILS
    EMPOWERgmat Slider
  • Varsity Tutors
    Award-winning private GMAT tutoring
    Register now and save up to $200

    Available with Beat the GMAT members only code

    MORE DETAILS
    Varsity Tutors
  • Magoosh
    Magoosh
    Study with Magoosh GMAT prep

    Available with Beat the GMAT members only code

    MORE DETAILS
    Magoosh
  • Target Test Prep
    5-Day Free Trial
    5-day free, full-access trial TTP Quant

    Available with Beat the GMAT members only code

    MORE DETAILS
    Target Test Prep

number of points a circle can intersect a triangle

This topic has 3 expert replies and 3 member replies
AMat700 Newbie | Next Rank: 10 Posts Default Avatar
Joined
31 Jul 2010
Posted:
6 messages
Followed by:
1 members
Upvotes:
1

number of points a circle can intersect a triangle

Post Tue Feb 22, 2011 8:03 pm
Which of the following lists the number of points at which a circle can intersect a triangle?

A)2 and 6 only
B)2, 4, and 6 only
C)1, 2, 3 and 6 only
D)1, 2, 3, 4 and 6 only
E)1, 2, 3, 4, 5, and 6

Answer: E

How do you solve? I don't even understand this question.

  • +1 Upvote Post
  • Quote
  • Flag
Need free GMAT or MBA advice from an expert? Register for Beat The GMAT now and post your question in these forums!
Top Reply
Post Mon May 20, 2013 2:26 pm
aircraft wrote:
Define the difference between intersecting and to be tangent in cases 1 three and five...I know the OA, but with all due respect, 1, 3 and 5 strictly speaking is not intersecting.
"Intersect" does not necessarily mean "pass through."
To intersect is to share a common point.
So, a line that is tangent to a circle (touching the circle but not passing through it) can be said to intersect the circle.

The Official Guide doesn't have a formal definition of "intersect," but we can infer its meaning from the test-maker's definition of a closed plane figure (e.g., a rectangle):

A polygon is a closed plane figure formed by three or more line segments, called the sides of the
polygon. Each side intersects exactly two other sides at their endpoints.


So, the adjacent sides of a rectangle do not pass through each other, but they are said to intersect.

Cheers,
Brent

_________________
Brent Hanneson – Founder of GMATPrepNow.com
Use our video course along with Beat The GMAT's free 60-Day Study Guide

Check out the online reviews of our course
Come see all of our free resources

  • +1 Upvote Post
  • Quote
  • Flag
GMAT Prep Now's comprehensive video course can be used in conjunction with Beat The GMAT’s FREE 60-Day Study Guide and reach your target score in 2 months!
ygcrowanhand Junior | Next Rank: 30 Posts
Joined
24 Nov 2014
Posted:
21 messages
Top Reply
Post Thu Sep 28, 2017 7:05 am
Hi GMATters,

Here's my video solution to this question:

https://youtu.be/pxGsBiEYndo

Enjoy!

Rowan

_________________
Learn the Top 3 GMAT Arithmetic Techniques with this free PDF guide!

https://yourgmatcoach.withcoach.com/free-pdf-guide-top-3-700-level-gmat-arithmetic-shortcuts

  • +1 Upvote Post
  • Quote
  • Flag
Post Mon May 20, 2013 2:26 pm
aircraft wrote:
Define the difference between intersecting and to be tangent in cases 1 three and five...I know the OA, but with all due respect, 1, 3 and 5 strictly speaking is not intersecting.
"Intersect" does not necessarily mean "pass through."
To intersect is to share a common point.
So, a line that is tangent to a circle (touching the circle but not passing through it) can be said to intersect the circle.

The Official Guide doesn't have a formal definition of "intersect," but we can infer its meaning from the test-maker's definition of a closed plane figure (e.g., a rectangle):

A polygon is a closed plane figure formed by three or more line segments, called the sides of the
polygon. Each side intersects exactly two other sides at their endpoints.


So, the adjacent sides of a rectangle do not pass through each other, but they are said to intersect.

Cheers,
Brent

_________________
Brent Hanneson – Founder of GMATPrepNow.com
Use our video course along with Beat The GMAT's free 60-Day Study Guide

Check out the online reviews of our course
Come see all of our free resources

  • +1 Upvote Post
  • Quote
  • Flag
GMAT Prep Now's comprehensive video course can be used in conjunction with Beat The GMAT’s FREE 60-Day Study Guide and reach your target score in 2 months!
ygcrowanhand Junior | Next Rank: 30 Posts
Joined
24 Nov 2014
Posted:
21 messages
Post Thu Sep 28, 2017 7:05 am
Hi GMATters,

Here's my video solution to this question:

https://youtu.be/pxGsBiEYndo

Enjoy!

Rowan

_________________
Learn the Top 3 GMAT Arithmetic Techniques with this free PDF guide!

https://yourgmatcoach.withcoach.com/free-pdf-guide-top-3-700-level-gmat-arithmetic-shortcuts

  • +1 Upvote Post
  • Quote
  • Flag
aircraft Newbie | Next Rank: 10 Posts Default Avatar
Joined
15 May 2013
Posted:
6 messages
Post Mon May 20, 2013 2:17 pm
Define the difference between intersecting and to be tangent in cases 1 three and five...I know the OA, but with all due respect, 1, 3 and 5 strictly speaking is not intersecting.

  • +1 Upvote Post
  • Quote
  • Flag
Kemmy G Junior | Next Rank: 30 Posts Default Avatar
Joined
06 Apr 2011
Posted:
19 messages
Followed by:
1 members
Post Mon May 21, 2012 1:53 pm
@GMATGuruNY,

I beg to differ. For those who don't even understand the question (like me!) Your explanation doesn't help at all. What if the testmakers purposely threw in the 5 to confuse those who don't know what to do? I'll appreciate if you could give a more detailed explanation. Thank you!

  • +1 Upvote Post
  • Quote
  • Flag

Best Conversation Starters

1 lheiannie07 120 topics
2 ardz24 65 topics
3 LUANDATO 63 topics
4 swerve 61 topics
5 AAPL 59 topics
See More Top Beat The GMAT Members...

Most Active Experts

1 image description Scott@TargetTestPrep

Target Test Prep

186 posts
2 image description Brent@GMATPrepNow

GMAT Prep Now Teacher

171 posts
3 image description Jeff@TargetTestPrep

Target Test Prep

147 posts
4 image description Rich.C@EMPOWERgma...

EMPOWERgmat

133 posts
5 image description GMATGuruNY

The Princeton Review Teacher

128 posts
See More Top Beat The GMAT Experts