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Having been named for a mythological

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boomgoesthegmat Senior | Next Rank: 100 Posts Default Avatar
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Having been named for a mythological

Post Thu Apr 28, 2016 11:49 am
Having been named for a mythological nymph who cared for the infant Jupiter, the asteroid named Ida, in the middle of the belt of asteroids that orbit the Sun between Mars and Jupiter, was discovered in 1884.

A) Having been named for a mythological nymph who cared for the infant Jupiter, the asteroid named Ida, in the middle of the belt of asteroids that orbit the Sun between Mars and Jupiter, was discovered in 1884.

B) Discovered in 1884, the asteroid Ida, named for a mythological nymph who cared for the infant Jupiter, is in the middle of the belt of asteroids that orbit the Sun between Mars and Jupiter.

C) In the middle of the belt of asteroids that orbit the Sun between Mars and Jupiter, the asteroid Ida, discovered in 1884 and named for a mythological nymph who cared for the infant Jupiter.

D) The asteroid Ida, named for a mythological nymph who cared for the infant Jupiter and discovered in 1884, is in the middle of the belt of asteroids to orbit the Sun between Mars and Jupiter.

E) Ida, an asteroid discovered in 1884 and which was named for a mythological nymph who cared for the infant Jupiter, is in the middle of the belt of asteroids to orbit the Sun between Mars and Jupiter

B

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Marty Murray Legendary Member
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Post Sun May 28, 2017 12:19 pm
raffairon wrote:
Hi,
here's what the official solution says about answer A
"A. Opening with a past perfect passive verb, Having been named, this version of the sentence illogically suggests that being named for a mythological nymph preceded the discovery of Ilda"

Why Having been named is "past perfect passive"? The past perfect is formed by
subject + had + past participle
So the passive would be
Subject + had + been + past participle

In this case the past perfect passive would be "Had been named" and not "Having been named"

Can someone please explain?

Thanks
The official explanation is a little misleading, in that the sentence does not open with a simple verb, it opens with a past perfect passive PARTICIPLE.

In case you are not clear about what participle is, I'll add that participle is a verb form that serves as a modifier modifying a noun or a clause and that takes a noun as its agent, the doer of the action expressed by the participle, or its receiver, the target of the action expressed by the participle.

There are present participles, past participles, and past perfect participles, and this sentences begins with a past perfect participle.

Present Participle:

Naming - conveys that the naming occurred at the same time as the main action in the sentence.

Example: Naming the planet after Ida, Jupiter recognized the nymph who had raised him.

"Jupiter" is the agent of "naming".

Past Participle:

Named - conveys that the action described by the participle happened in the past.

Example: Named after the dog in the movie, John's beagle Benji likes to play.

"Benji" is the receiver of "named".

The dog was named in the past and likes to play now.

Past Perfect Participle:

Having named - conveys that the action described by the participle happened before an action or event in the clause that follows the participle.

Example: Having named the planet after the nymph Ida, the astronomer decided to tell his friends.

So the astronomer,, the agent of "having named", named the planet and then told his friends.

Part Perfect Passive Participle:

Having been named - conveys that the agent of the participle was acted on before the event described in the main clause.

Example: Having been named after a nymph, the planet Ida became a favorite of many young students.

To be clear, the simple past participle conveys something very similar to what the past perfect passive participle conveys.

Example: Named after a nymph, the planet Ida became a favorite of many young students.

The difference between the meaning conveyed by the simple past participle and the past perfect passive participle is a subtle one.

The simple past is focused on merely describing the receiver. In the above example, "the planet Ida", which is the receiver of "Named" is described as "Named after a nymph".

The past perfect passive participle is used to clearly convey that the event described by the participle occurred before the event mentioned in the clause.

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m.w.murray@hotmail.com
http://infinitemindprep.com/
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raffairon Newbie | Next Rank: 10 Posts Default Avatar
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Post Sat May 27, 2017 10:24 am
Hi,
here's what the official solution says about answer A
"A. Opening with a past perfect passive verb, Having been named, this version of the sentence illogically suggests that being named for a mythological nymph preceded the discovery of Ilda"

Why Having been named is "past perfect passive"? The past perfect is formed by
subject + had + past participle
So the passive would be
Subject + had + been + past participle

In this case the past perfect passive would be "Had been named" and not "Having been named"

Can someone please explain?

Thanks

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Marty Murray Legendary Member
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03 Feb 2014
Posted:
2050 messages
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129 members
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Post Sun May 28, 2017 12:19 pm
raffairon wrote:
Hi,
here's what the official solution says about answer A
"A. Opening with a past perfect passive verb, Having been named, this version of the sentence illogically suggests that being named for a mythological nymph preceded the discovery of Ilda"

Why Having been named is "past perfect passive"? The past perfect is formed by
subject + had + past participle
So the passive would be
Subject + had + been + past participle

In this case the past perfect passive would be "Had been named" and not "Having been named"

Can someone please explain?

Thanks
The official explanation is a little misleading, in that the sentence does not open with a simple verb, it opens with a past perfect passive PARTICIPLE.

In case you are not clear about what participle is, I'll add that participle is a verb form that serves as a modifier modifying a noun or a clause and that takes a noun as its agent, the doer of the action expressed by the participle, or its receiver, the target of the action expressed by the participle.

There are present participles, past participles, and past perfect participles, and this sentences begins with a past perfect participle.

Present Participle:

Naming - conveys that the naming occurred at the same time as the main action in the sentence.

Example: Naming the planet after Ida, Jupiter recognized the nymph who had raised him.

"Jupiter" is the agent of "naming".

Past Participle:

Named - conveys that the action described by the participle happened in the past.

Example: Named after the dog in the movie, John's beagle Benji likes to play.

"Benji" is the receiver of "named".

The dog was named in the past and likes to play now.

Past Perfect Participle:

Having named - conveys that the action described by the participle happened before an action or event in the clause that follows the participle.

Example: Having named the planet after the nymph Ida, the astronomer decided to tell his friends.

So the astronomer,, the agent of "having named", named the planet and then told his friends.

Part Perfect Passive Participle:

Having been named - conveys that the agent of the participle was acted on before the event described in the main clause.

Example: Having been named after a nymph, the planet Ida became a favorite of many young students.

To be clear, the simple past participle conveys something very similar to what the past perfect passive participle conveys.

Example: Named after a nymph, the planet Ida became a favorite of many young students.

The difference between the meaning conveyed by the simple past participle and the past perfect passive participle is a subtle one.

The simple past is focused on merely describing the receiver. In the above example, "the planet Ida", which is the receiver of "Named" is described as "Named after a nymph".

The past perfect passive participle is used to clearly convey that the event described by the participle occurred before the event mentioned in the clause.

_________________
Marty Murray
GMAT Coach
m.w.murray@hotmail.com
http://infinitemindprep.com/
In Person in the New York Area and Online Worldwide

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raffairon Newbie | Next Rank: 10 Posts Default Avatar
Joined
21 Feb 2014
Posted:
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Post Sat May 27, 2017 10:24 am
Hi,
here's what the official solution says about answer A
"A. Opening with a past perfect passive verb, Having been named, this version of the sentence illogically suggests that being named for a mythological nymph preceded the discovery of Ilda"

Why Having been named is "past perfect passive"? The past perfect is formed by
subject + had + past participle
So the passive would be
Subject + had + been + past participle

In this case the past perfect passive would be "Had been named" and not "Having been named"

Can someone please explain?

Thanks

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