• Varsity Tutors
    Award-winning private GMAT tutoring
    Register now and save up to $200

    Available with Beat the GMAT members only code

    MORE DETAILS
    Varsity Tutors
  • Magoosh
    Magoosh
    Study with Magoosh GMAT prep

    Available with Beat the GMAT members only code

    MORE DETAILS
    Magoosh
  • Kaplan Test Prep
    Free Practice Test & Review
    How would you score if you took the GMAT

    Available with Beat the GMAT members only code

    MORE DETAILS
    Kaplan Test Prep
  • Economist Test Prep
    Free Trial & Practice Exam
    BEAT THE GMAT EXCLUSIVE

    Available with Beat the GMAT members only code

    MORE DETAILS
    Economist Test Prep
  • EMPOWERgmat Slider
    1 Hour Free
    BEAT THE GMAT EXCLUSIVE

    Available with Beat the GMAT members only code

    MORE DETAILS
    EMPOWERgmat Slider
  • Veritas Prep
    Free Veritas GMAT Class
    Experience Lesson 1 Live Free

    Available with Beat the GMAT members only code

    MORE DETAILS
    Veritas Prep
  • Target Test Prep
    5-Day Free Trial
    5-day free, full-access trial TTP Quant

    Available with Beat the GMAT members only code

    MORE DETAILS
    Target Test Prep
  • PrepScholar GMAT
    5 Day FREE Trial
    Study Smarter, Not Harder

    Available with Beat the GMAT members only code

    MORE DETAILS
    PrepScholar GMAT
  • e-gmat Exclusive Offer
    Get 300+ Practice Questions
    25 Video lessons and 6 Webinars for FREE

    Available with Beat the GMAT members only code

    MORE DETAILS
    e-gmat Exclusive Offer

A square with area 25 has one vertex on point (-2, 1) in the

This topic has 7 member replies
gmattesttaker2 Legendary Member Default Avatar
Joined
14 Feb 2012
Posted:
641 messages
Followed by:
8 members
Thanked:
11 times

A square with area 25 has one vertex on point (-2, 1) in the

Post Sat Jun 21, 2014 6:21 pm
Hello,

Can you please help with this? Thanks a lot.

Regards,
Sri

OA: x-coordinate: -5 y-coordinate: -3
Attachments

This post contains an attachment. You must be logged in to download/view this file. Please login or register as a user.

Need free GMAT or MBA advice from an expert? Register for Beat The GMAT now and post your question in these forums!
Post Sun Jun 22, 2014 4:11 pm
Hi Sri,

This IR question is based on one particular graphing concept: when you draw a diagonal line on a graph, you can draw a right triangle with THAT diagonal line as its hypotenuse.

This prompt tells us that we're dealing with a square that has an area of 25, so it's side lengths all equal 5. With the co-ordinate (-2,1) as a vertex, we're looking for ANOTHER vertex that is "5 away."

The most common triangle on the GMAT with a hypotenuse of 5 is a "3/4/5 right triangle", so I'd be looking for THAT pattern among the answer choices. Is one of the numbers 3 or 4 "away" from -2? Is another 4 or 3 "away" from 1?

"-5" is "3 away" from -2.
"-3" is "4 away from 1.

So, (-5,-3) is the vertex.

GMAT assassins aren't born, they're made,
Rich

_________________
Contact Rich at Rich.C@empowergmat.com

Thanked by: gmattesttaker2
confused13 Senior | Next Rank: 100 Posts Default Avatar
Joined
17 Dec 2013
Posted:
97 messages
Followed by:
2 members
Thanked:
8 times
Post Sun Jun 22, 2014 10:13 pm
This doesn't make sense?

In the (negative, negative) range is only one coordinate (-7,-4) but that's clearly not an option. Could someone explain it in a different way?

The points of the OA and the given point, don't even form a square together?

Post Mon Jun 23, 2014 12:54 am
Hi confused13,

You assume that the square has to be parallel with the X-axis and the Y-axis, but the prompt DID NOT state that. The solution to this question has the square placed "diagonally."

GMAT assassins aren't born, they're made,
Rich

_________________
Contact Rich at Rich.C@empowergmat.com

Thanked by: confused13
confused13 Senior | Next Rank: 100 Posts Default Avatar
Joined
17 Dec 2013
Posted:
97 messages
Followed by:
2 members
Thanked:
8 times
Post Mon Jun 23, 2014 3:38 am
So you mean it actually forms an rhombus?

Post Mon Jun 23, 2014 11:07 am
Hi confused13,

It's still a square (it has to be; the prompt says so). To help you visualize what I'm talking about, try drawing a square on a piece of paper. Next, turn the paper a little bit clockwise or counterclockwise. Notice how it's still a square? It's just not "level." This IR question is built on that concept.

GMAT assassins aren't born, they're made,
Rich

_________________
Contact Rich at Rich.C@empowergmat.com

Thanked by: confused13
gmattesttaker2 Legendary Member Default Avatar
Joined
14 Feb 2012
Posted:
641 messages
Followed by:
8 members
Thanked:
11 times
Post Sat Jun 28, 2014 5:39 pm
Rich.C@EMPOWERgmat.com wrote:
Hi Sri,

This IR question is based on one particular graphing concept: when you draw a diagonal line on a graph, you can draw a right triangle with THAT diagonal line as its hypotenuse.

This prompt tells us that we're dealing with a square that has an area of 25, so it's side lengths all equal 5. With the co-ordinate (-2,1) as a vertex, we're looking for ANOTHER vertex that is "5 away."

The most common triangle on the GMAT with a hypotenuse of 5 is a "3/4/5 right triangle", so I'd be looking for THAT pattern among the answer choices. Is one of the numbers 3 or 4 "away" from -2? Is another 4 or 3 "away" from 1?

"-5" is "3 away" from -2.
"-3" is "4 away from 1.

So, (-5,-3) is the vertex.

GMAT assassins aren't born, they're made,
Rich
Hello Rich,

Thanks a lot for the explanation. Since the square has an area of 25, its side is 5 and diagonal is 5 sq. root (2). Now, when we join (-5,1) and (-2,-3) we get 3-4-5 triangle. I was wondering though why the diagonal here is 5 and not 5 sq.root(2). Thanks a lot for your help.

Best Regards,
Sri

Post Sat Jun 28, 2014 6:02 pm
Hi Sri,

The side of the square is 5; THAT'S the side that we're interested in (NOT the diagonal of the square).

Try drawing the following points (-5,-3) and (-2,1). If you connect them, then you'll have a diagonal line. Next, using that diagonal line, draw a right triangle. The base will be 3 and the height will be 4; THIS is the 3/4/5 right triangle that I referred to in my explanation.

GMAT assassins aren't born, they're made,
Rich

_________________
Contact Rich at Rich.C@empowergmat.com

Thanked by: gmattesttaker2

Best Conversation Starters

1 Vincen 152 topics
2 lheiannie07 61 topics
3 Roland2rule 49 topics
4 ardz24 40 topics
5 LUANDATO 32 topics
See More Top Beat The GMAT Members...

Most Active Experts

1 image description Brent@GMATPrepNow

GMAT Prep Now Teacher

141 posts
2 image description EconomistGMATTutor

The Economist GMAT Tutor

107 posts
3 image description GMATGuruNY

The Princeton Review Teacher

106 posts
4 image description Rich.C@EMPOWERgma...

EMPOWERgmat

104 posts
5 image description Matt@VeritasPrep

Veritas Prep

76 posts
See More Top Beat The GMAT Experts