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A rising interest in Native American customs

This topic has 40 member replies
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asax Junior | Next Rank: 30 Posts Default Avatar
Joined
04 Jun 2012
Posted:
26 messages
Thanked:
1 times
Post Sat Jul 07, 2012 2:33 am
got two wrong. 62 & 66 Sad

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Ganesh hatwar Senior | Next Rank: 100 Posts Default Avatar
Joined
24 Jun 2012
Posted:
97 messages
Target GMAT Score:
700+
Post Mon Jul 16, 2012 11:25 pm
ironsferri wrote:
At the end of the nineteenth century, a rising interest
in Native American customs and an increasing desire to
understand Native American culture prompted ethnologists
to begin recording the life stories of Native American.
Ethnologists had a distinct reason for wanting to
hear the stories: they were after linguistic or anthropological
data that would supplement their own field
observations, and they believed that the personal
stories, even of a single individual, could increase
their understanding of the cultures that they had been
observing from without. In addition many ethnologists
at the turn of the century believed that Native American
manners and customs were rapidly disappearing,
and that it was important to preserve for posterity as
much information as could be adequately recorded
before the cultures disappeared forever.
There were, however, arguments against this method
as a way of acquiring accurate and complete information.
Franz Boas, for example, described autobiographies as being
“of limited value, and useful chiefly for
the study of the perversion of truth by memory,” while
Paul Radin contended that investigators rarely spent
enough time with the tribes they were observing, and
inevitably derived results too tinged by the investi-
gator’s own emotional tone to be reliable.
Even more importantly, as these life stories moved
from the traditional oral mode to recorded written
form, much was inevitably lost. Editors often decided
what elements were significant to the field research on a
given tribe. Native Americans recognized that the
essence of their lives could not be communicated in
English and that events that they thought significant
were often deemed unimportant by their interviewers.
Indeed, the very act of telling their stories could force
Native American narrators to distort their cultures, as
taboos had to be broken to speak the names of dead
relatives crucial to their family stories.
Despite all of this, autobiography remains a useful
tool for ethnological research: such personal reminiscences
and impressions, incomplete as they may be, are
likely to throw more light on the working of the mind
and emotions than any amount of speculation from an
ethnologist or ethnological theorist from another
culture.

61. Which of the following best describes the organization of the passage?
(A) The historical backgrounds of two currently used research methods are chronicled.
(B) The validity of the data collected by using two different research methods is compared.
(C) The usefulness of a research method is questioned and then a new method is proposed.
(D) The use of a research method is described and the limitations of the results obtained are discussed.
(E) A research method is evaluated and the changes necessary for its adaptation to other subject areas are
discussed.
62. Which of the following is most similar to the actions of nineteenth-century ethnologists in their editing of the life stories of
Native Americans?
(A) A witness in a jury trial invokes the Fifth Amendment in order to avoid relating personally incriminating evidence.
(B) A stockbroker refuses to divulge the source of her information on the possible future increase in a stock’s value.
(C) A sports announcer describes the action in a team sport with which he is unfamiliar.
(D) A chef purposely excludes the special ingredient from the recipe of his prizewinning dessert.
(E) A politician fails to mention in a campaign speech the similarities in the positions held by her opponent for political
office and by herself.
63. According to the passage, collecting life stories can be a useful methodology because
(A) life stories provide deeper insights into a culture than the hypothesizing of academics who are not members of
233
that culture
(B) life stories can be collected easily and they are not subject to invalid interpretations
(C) ethnologists have a limited number of research methods from which to choose
(D) life stories make it easy to distinguish between the important and unimportant features of a culture
(E) the collection of life stories does not require a culturally knowledgeable investigator
64. Information in the passage suggests that which of the following may be a possible way to eliminate bias in the editing of
life stories?
(A) Basing all inferences made about the culture on an ethnological theory
(B) Eliminating all of the emotion-laden information reported by the informant
(C) Translating the informant’s words into the researcher’s language
(D) Reducing the number of questions and carefully specifying the content of the questions that the investigator can
ask the informant
(E) Reporting all of the information that the informant provides regardless of the investigator’s personal opinion about
its intrinsic value
65. The primary purpose of the passage as a whole is to
(A) question an explanation
(B) correct a misconception
(C) critique a methodology
(D) discredit an idea
(E) clarify an ambiguity
66. It can be inferred from the passage that a characteristic of the ethnological research on Native Americans conducted
during the nineteenth century was the use of which of the following?
(A) Investigators familiar with the culture under study
(B) A language other than the informant’s for recording life stories
(C) Life stories as the ethnologist’s primary source of information
(D) Complete transcriptions of informants’ descriptions of tribal beliefs
(E) Stringent guidelines for the preservation of cultural data



Guys, what you think is the difficulty level on this one?

I'm trying to adopt 1 method to tackle RCs; some say read and note down just first and last sentence of the first and last PARA, and first sentence of other paragraphs. Others instead say to read carefully the whole passage.

I tried both and on easy RC, the first works, but in tough RCs is DISASTROUS method to use (doesn't work at all as you lack of understanding of the passage and questions will address that).

What is a good balance that can be used for both easy and harder RCs ?

@bout me; [Non-native, non-fast reader, takes lots of time to read/note the passage]

Thank you all!
It was difficult passage .. lenghy passage are mostly i find difficult . I too Non native

My choices

D
D
A
E
C
B

I did in 12 min

Ganesh hatwar Senior | Next Rank: 100 Posts Default Avatar
Joined
24 Jun 2012
Posted:
97 messages
Target GMAT Score:
700+
Post Mon Jul 16, 2012 11:31 pm
Ganesh hatwar wrote:
ironsferri wrote:
At the end of the nineteenth century, a rising interest
in Native American customs and an increasing desire to
understand Native American culture prompted ethnologists
to begin recording the life stories of Native American.
Ethnologists had a distinct reason for wanting to
hear the stories: they were after linguistic or anthropological
data that would supplement their own field
observations, and they believed that the personal
stories, even of a single individual, could increase
their understanding of the cultures that they had been
observing from without. In addition many ethnologists
at the turn of the century believed that Native American
manners and customs were rapidly disappearing,
and that it was important to preserve for posterity as
much information as could be adequately recorded
before the cultures disappeared forever.
There were, however, arguments against this method
as a way of acquiring accurate and complete information.
Franz Boas, for example, described autobiographies as being
“of limited value, and useful chiefly for
the study of the perversion of truth by memory,” while
Paul Radin contended that investigators rarely spent
enough time with the tribes they were observing, and
inevitably derived results too tinged by the investi-
gator’s own emotional tone to be reliable.
Even more importantly, as these life stories moved
from the traditional oral mode to recorded written
form, much was inevitably lost. Editors often decided
what elements were significant to the field research on a
given tribe. Native Americans recognized that the
essence of their lives could not be communicated in
English and that events that they thought significant
were often deemed unimportant by their interviewers.
Indeed, the very act of telling their stories could force
Native American narrators to distort their cultures, as
taboos had to be broken to speak the names of dead
relatives crucial to their family stories.
Despite all of this, autobiography remains a useful
tool for ethnological research: such personal reminiscences
and impressions, incomplete as they may be, are
likely to throw more light on the working of the mind
and emotions than any amount of speculation from an
ethnologist or ethnological theorist from another
culture.

61. Which of the following best describes the organization of the passage?
(A) The historical backgrounds of two currently used research methods are chronicled.
(B) The validity of the data collected by using two different research methods is compared.
(C) The usefulness of a research method is questioned and then a new method is proposed.
(D) The use of a research method is described and the limitations of the results obtained are discussed.
(E) A research method is evaluated and the changes necessary for its adaptation to other subject areas are
discussed.
62. Which of the following is most similar to the actions of nineteenth-century ethnologists in their editing of the life stories of
Native Americans?
(A) A witness in a jury trial invokes the Fifth Amendment in order to avoid relating personally incriminating evidence.
(B) A stockbroker refuses to divulge the source of her information on the possible future increase in a stock’s value.
(C) A sports announcer describes the action in a team sport with which he is unfamiliar.
(D) A chef purposely excludes the special ingredient from the recipe of his prizewinning dessert.
(E) A politician fails to mention in a campaign speech the similarities in the positions held by her opponent for political
office and by herself.
63. According to the passage, collecting life stories can be a useful methodology because
(A) life stories provide deeper insights into a culture than the hypothesizing of academics who are not members of
233
that culture
(B) life stories can be collected easily and they are not subject to invalid interpretations
(C) ethnologists have a limited number of research methods from which to choose
(D) life stories make it easy to distinguish between the important and unimportant features of a culture
(E) the collection of life stories does not require a culturally knowledgeable investigator
64. Information in the passage suggests that which of the following may be a possible way to eliminate bias in the editing of
life stories?
(A) Basing all inferences made about the culture on an ethnological theory
(B) Eliminating all of the emotion-laden information reported by the informant
(C) Translating the informant’s words into the researcher’s language
(D) Reducing the number of questions and carefully specifying the content of the questions that the investigator can
ask the informant
(E) Reporting all of the information that the informant provides regardless of the investigator’s personal opinion about
its intrinsic value
65. The primary purpose of the passage as a whole is to
(A) question an explanation
(B) correct a misconception
(C) critique a methodology
(D) discredit an idea
(E) clarify an ambiguity
66. It can be inferred from the passage that a characteristic of the ethnological research on Native Americans conducted
during the nineteenth century was the use of which of the following?
(A) Investigators familiar with the culture under study
(B) A language other than the informant’s for recording life stories
(C) Life stories as the ethnologist’s primary source of information
(D) Complete transcriptions of informants’ descriptions of tribal beliefs
(E) Stringent guidelines for the preservation of cultural data



Guys, what you think is the difficulty level on this one?

I'm trying to adopt 1 method to tackle RCs; some say read and note down just first and last sentence of the first and last PARA, and first sentence of other paragraphs. Others instead say to read carefully the whole passage.

I tried both and on easy RC, the first works, but in tough RCs is DISASTROUS method to use (doesn't work at all as you lack of understanding of the passage and questions will address that).

What is a good balance that can be used for both easy and harder RCs ?

@bout me; [Non-native, non-fast reader, takes lots of time to read/note the passage]

Thank you all!
It was difficult passage .. lenghy passage are mostly i find difficult . I too Non native

My choices

D
D
A
E
C
B

I did in 12 min
hurry i got only one wrong Pleasantly surprised!.. what is fifth amendment.. This one is culturally biased question .. Anyways this was not the answer choice..

Ravipprasad Newbie | Next Rank: 10 Posts Default Avatar
Joined
15 Sep 2012
Posted:
2 messages
Post Thu Oct 11, 2012 7:19 am
I got the last one wrong. For 62, my explanation is unfamiliar culture compared with unfamiliar sports. And the last question was confusing for me. In difficulty scale, I would give 4/10. Maybe coz I am a Sociology major.

irony Newbie | Next Rank: 10 Posts Default Avatar
Joined
15 Jan 2011
Posted:
3 messages
Post Tue Oct 16, 2012 9:21 pm
In Ques. 65
I'm not able to get where was the author critisizing the methodology?

vikram4689 Legendary Member
Joined
01 Nov 2009
Posted:
1325 messages
Followed by:
14 members
Thanked:
105 times
Post Fri Oct 19, 2012 9:06 am
irony wrote:
In Ques. 65
I'm not able to get where was the author critisizing the methodology?
you are confusing "critique"(analyzing/evaluating the subject) and "criticize"(saying negative things).

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rajeshsinghgmat Master | Next Rank: 500 Posts Default Avatar
Joined
08 Jan 2013
Posted:
171 messages
Thanked:
1 times
Post Sun Feb 03, 2013 7:03 pm
61 --> D

62 --> C

63 --> A

64 --> E

65 --> C

66 --> B

dipti.oec Junior | Next Rank: 30 Posts Default Avatar
Joined
11 Aug 2010
Posted:
12 messages
Target GMAT Score:
750
GMAT Score:
610
Post Thu May 02, 2013 11:35 am
ironsferri wrote:
OA

D
C
A
E
C
B
Same as yours. I think the difficulty is 6-7/10

JurgenPeci Newbie | Next Rank: 10 Posts
Joined
26 Apr 2012
Posted:
4 messages
Post Fri Mar 07, 2014 7:13 am
I got:

61. D
62. C
63. A
64. E or B (Not sure)
65. C
66. C or B (Not sure).

Curious...

vinitkhicha Junior | Next Rank: 30 Posts Default Avatar
Joined
21 Jan 2014
Posted:
13 messages
Test Date:
27.11.2014
Target GMAT Score:
780
GMAT Score:
720
Post Mon Oct 13, 2014 1:24 am
Yippee..I got all these right as per the OAS provided. I think the difficulty level is around 650-700.

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Rahul428 Senior | Next Rank: 100 Posts Default Avatar
Joined
17 May 2013
Posted:
37 messages
Post Thu Jun 15, 2017 6:38 am
My answer --

61 C
62 C
63 A
64 E
65 C
66 C

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