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1000 RC Passage 2 Q 3&6

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1000 RC Passage 2 Q 3&6

Post Sun Aug 26, 2007 7:27 am
Elapsed Time: 00:00
  • Lap #[LAPCOUNT] ([LAPTIME])
    Passage 2 (2/63)
    Woodrow Wilson was referring to the liberal idea of the economic market when he said that the free enterprise system is the most efficient economic system. Maximum freedom means maximum productiveness; our "openness" is to be the measure of our stability. Fascination with this ideal has made Americans defy the "Old World" categories of settled possessiveness versus unsettling deprivation, the cupidity of retention versus the cupidity of seizure, a "status quo" defended or attacked. The United States, it was believed, had no status quo ante. Our only "station" was the turning of a stationary wheel, spinning faster and faster. We did not base our system on property but opportunity-which meant we based it not on stability but on mobility. The more things changed, that is, the more rapidly the wheel turned, the steadier we would be. The conventional picture of class politics is composed of the Haves, who want a stability to keep what they have, and the Have-Nots, who want a touch of instability and change in which to scramble for the things they have not. But Americans imagined a condition in which speculators, self-makers, runners are always using the new opportunities given by our land. These economic leaders (front-runners) would thus be mainly agents of change. The nonstarters were considered the ones who wanted stability, a strong referee to give them some position in the race, a regulative hand to calm manic speculation; an authority that can call things to a halt, begin things again from compensatorily staggered "starting lines."
    "Reform" in America has been sterile because it can imagine no change except through the extension of this metaphor of a race, wider inclusion of competitors, "a piece of the action," as it were, for the disenfranchised. There is no attempt to call off the race. Since our only stability is change, America seems not to honor the quiet work that achieves social interdependence and stability. There is, in our legends, no heroism of the office clerk, no stable industrial work force of the people who actually make the system work. There is no pride in being an employee (Wilson asked for a return to the time when everyone was an employer). There has been no boasting about our social workers-they are merely signs of the system's failure, of opportunity denied or not taken, of things to be eliminated. We have no pride in our growing interdependence, in the fact that our system can serve others, that we are able to help those in need; empty boasts from the past make us ashamed of our present achievements, make us try to forget or deny them, move away from them. There is no honor but in the Wonderland race we must all run, all trying to win, none winning in the end (for there is no end).

    In the context of the author's discussion of regulating change, which of the following could be most probably regarded as a "strong referee" (line 30) in the United States?
    (A) A school principal
    (B) A political theorist
    (C) A federal court judge
    (D) A social worker
    (E) A government inspector

    6. Which of the following metaphors could the author most appropriately use to summarize his own assessment of the American economic system (lines 35-60)?
    (A) A windmill
    (B) A waterfall
    (C) A treadmill
    (D) A gyroscope
    (E) A bellows



    Please let me know the reason for that answer. try yourself for the answer or look in the document.

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    Uri Master | Next Rank: 500 Posts
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    Post Tue Feb 17, 2009 7:25 am
    I have come across this passage just now. Frankly speaking, while reading the passage, I could not understand almost anything, except that the author is dissatisfied with something Shocked I am not a native English speaker and this type of "heavy material" seems simply boring. Can anyone suggest how we can overcome this type of passage? Just like most GMAT problems, does this type of RC passage also have any short-cut Rolling Eyes

    I have seen some strategies in some materials. Mental road-maps, writing main points on paper etc. But writing takes too long, specially as I believe that we can not afford more than 4 minutes for reading the entire passage (in fact, it should be even less). Mental maps obviously don't work for this type of passages Embarassed What should I do?

    To add to my woes, my reading speed is also not that great. In a nut-shell, I have perhaps all the problems that anyone can have with RC. Can any guru please help me Question Question Question

    Bidisha_800 Senior | Next Rank: 100 Posts Default Avatar
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    Post Wed Feb 18, 2009 10:59 pm
    (C) from the sentence " an authority that can call things to a halt"

    (C) run, run and run but nowhere to reach

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    Uri Master | Next Rank: 500 Posts
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    Post Thu Feb 19, 2009 9:14 am
    Bidisha_800 wrote:
    (C) from the sentence " an authority that can call things to a halt"

    (C) run, run and run but nowhere to reach

    i agree with you that both the answers should be (C). but unfortunately, the document, where i saw this question, says that answer to the first question is not (C), but rather (D)!!!

    i don't feel that the document is a reliable one.

    Rashmi1804 Master | Next Rank: 500 Posts Default Avatar
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    Post Fri Feb 20, 2009 5:41 am
    Uri..i think the answer set you have has some wrong answer. The one i have says its "C" only...not D. Smile
    Anyways..can you guys please explain the following one.

    It can be inferred from the passage that the author most probably thinks that giving the disenfranchised "a piece of the action" (line 38) is
    (A) a compassionate, if misdirected, legislative measure
    (B) an example of Americans' resistance to profound social change
    (C) an innovative program for genuine social reform
    (D) a monument to the efforts of industrial reformers
    (E) a surprisingly "Old World" remedy for social ills

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    Post Fri Feb 20, 2009 11:01 am
    Rashmi1804 wrote:
    Anyways..can you guys please explain the following one.

    It can be inferred from the passage that the author most probably thinks that giving the disenfranchised "a piece of the action" (line 38) is
    (A) a compassionate, if misdirected, legislative measure
    (B) an example of Americans' resistance to profound social change
    (C) an innovative program for genuine social reform
    (D) a monument to the efforts of industrial reformers
    (E) a surprisingly "Old World" remedy for social ills
    for this question, we can easily eliminate (A), (C) and (D). the statement- "it can imagine no change except through the extension of this metaphor of a race" is followed by blah blah. to me those blah blahs seem to be examples. and (B) sort of paraphrases the quoted text. so, i'd go for (B). but i am not very sure what i'd do in exam condition. Rolling Eyes


    ok, one more reason to go for (B). through out the whole passage the author seems to be critical of something Embarassed if we choose (E), the scenario will be reversed. it would seem as if the author actually favours what is happening.

    i know, this sounds very crude. but i'd not hesitate to do anything (ok, almost anything) to obtain a better percentile Smile

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    Rashmi1804 Master | Next Rank: 500 Posts Default Avatar
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    Post Sat Feb 21, 2009 1:45 am
    Thanks Uri.

    Please check this...http://www.beatthegmat.com/1000-rc-6-q-3-t31457.html#126780

    Uri Master | Next Rank: 500 Posts
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    Post Sun Feb 22, 2009 12:47 am
    Rashmi1804 wrote:
    Thanks Uri.

    Please check this...http://www.beatthegmat.com/1000-rc-6-q-3-t31457.html#126780

    very clever!!! but remember, i am not any expert, rather i am just an aspirant like you! any way, check the thread for the answer.

    rlevochkin Newbie | Next Rank: 10 Posts Default Avatar
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    Post Mon Feb 08, 2010 4:24 pm
    Uri wrote:
    Rashmi1804 wrote:
    Anyways..can you guys please explain the following one.

    It can be inferred from the passage that the author most probably thinks that giving the disenfranchised �a piece of the action� (line 38) is
    (A) a compassionate, if misdirected, legislative measure
    (B) an example of Americans� resistance to profound social change
    (C) an innovative program for genuine social reform
    (D) a monument to the efforts of industrial reformers
    (E) a surprisingly �Old World� remedy for social ills
    for this question, we can easily eliminate (A), (C) and (D). the statement- "it can imagine no change except through the extension of this metaphor of a race" is followed by blah blah. to me those blah blahs seem to be examples. and (B) sort of paraphrases the quoted text. so, i'd go for (B). but i am not very sure what i'd do in exam condition. Rolling Eyes


    ok, one more reason to go for (B). through out the whole passage the author seems to be critical of something Embarassed if we choose (E), the scenario will be reversed. it would seem as if the author actually favours what is happening.

    i know, this sounds very crude. but i'd not hesitate to do anything (ok, almost anything) to obtain a better percentile Smile
    Giving the disenfranchised a peice of action is comparative to providing a soft hand, thus, obscuring the change

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    Post Sun Feb 28, 2010 4:38 pm
    I'm not a native English speaker, so I don't really understand the expression "soft hand". Could you please explain?

    To me, "a piece of the action" ("resistance to profound change") would be something like a populist measure: it will keep the masses happy for a while but without really creating significat change, a deep one for that matter. Meaning that even if "getting a piece" may make the disenfranchised feel included, it really doesn't include them in a real social change.

    Am I rambling???

    Uri, I had to read the text 3 times to somewhat understand the meaning of it. And only by reading the questions I finally understood that the author was critizicing the American system... Such dry reading!!! Confused

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    Post Mon Aug 09, 2010 7:56 am
    Bidisha_800 wrote:
    (C) from the sentence " an authority that can call things to a halt"

    (C) run, run and run but nowhere to reach
    In the context of the author's discussion of regulating change, which of the following could be most probably regarded as a "strong referee" (line 30) in the United States?
    (A) A school principal
    (B) A political theorist
    (C) A federal court judge
    (D) A social worker
    (E) A government inspector

    for the above question both choices C and E would fit... wouldn't they??

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    Post Mon Aug 09, 2010 7:59 am
    Uri wrote:
    Rashmi1804 wrote:
    Anyways..can you guys please explain the following one.

    It can be inferred from the passage that the author most probably thinks that giving the disenfranchised �a piece of the action� (line 38) is
    (A) a compassionate, if misdirected, legislative measure
    (B) an example of Americans� resistance to profound social change
    (C) an innovative program for genuine social reform
    (D) a monument to the efforts of industrial reformers
    (E) a surprisingly �Old World� remedy for social ills
    for this question, we can easily eliminate (A), (C) and (D). the statement- "it can imagine no change except through the extension of this metaphor of a race" is followed by blah blah. to me those blah blahs seem to be examples. and (B) sort of paraphrases the quoted text. so, i'd go for (B). but i am not very sure what i'd do in exam condition. Rolling Eyes


    ok, one more reason to go for (B). through out the whole passage the author seems to be critical of something Embarassed if we choose (E), the scenario will be reversed. it would seem as if the author actually favours what is happening.

    i know, this sounds very crude. but i'd not hesitate to do anything (ok, almost anything) to obtain a better percentile Smile
    good explanation

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    arora007 Community Manager
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    Post Mon Aug 09, 2010 8:03 am
    It can be inferred from the passage that Woodrow Wilson’s ideas about the economic market
    (A) encouraged those who “make the system work” (lines 45-46)
    (B) perpetuated traditional legends about America
    (C) revealed the prejudices of a man born wealthy
    (D) foreshadowed the stock market crash of 1929
    (E) began a tradition of presidential proclamations on economics

    which lines help us infer B as the answer I somehow thought...that ?D could have been a choice.

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    Post Mon Aug 09, 2010 8:07 am
    The primary purpose of the passage is to
    (A) criticize the inflexibility of American economic mythology
    (B) contrast “Old World” and “New World” economic ideologies
    (C) challenge the integrity of traditional political leaders
    (D) champion those Americans whom the author deems to be neglected
    (E) suggest a substitute for the traditional metaphor of a race

    how does A fit in as a choice ? I fared really bad at this passage, did not understand most of it. I chose B as the answer.

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    Post Wed Oct 27, 2010 11:21 am
    Quote:
    Woodrow Wilson was referring to the liberal idea of the economic market when he said that the free enterprise system is the most efficient economic system. Maximum freedom means maximum productiveness; our “openness” is to be the measure of our stability. Fascination with this ideal has made Americans defy the “Old World” categories of settled possessiveness versus unsettling deprivation, the cupidity of retention versus the cupidity of seizure, a “status quo” defended or attacked. The United States, it was believed, had no status quo ante. Our only “station” was the turning of a stationary wheel, spinning faster and faster. We did not base our system on property but opportunity-which meant we based it not on stability but on mobility. The more things changed, that is, the more rapidly the wheel turned, the steadier we would be. The conventional picture of class politics is composed of the Haves, who want a stability to keep what they have, and the Have-Nots, who want a touch of instability and change in which to scramble for the things they have not. But Americans imagined a condition in which speculators, self-makers, runners are always using the new opportunities given by our land. These economic leaders (front-runners) would thus be mainly agents of change. The nonstarters were considered the ones who wanted stability, a strong referee to give them some position in the race, a regulative hand to calm manic speculation; an authority that can call things to a halt, begin things again from compensatorily staggered “starting lines.”

    “Reform” in America has been sterile because it can imagine no change except through the extension of this metaphor of a race, wider inclusion of competitors, “a piece of the action,” as it were, for the disenfranchised. There is no attempt to call off the race. Since our only stability is change, America seems not to honor the quiet work that achieves social interdependence and stability. There is, in our legends, no heroism of the office clerk, no stable industrial work force of the people who actually make the system work. There is no pride in being an employee (Wilson asked for a return to the time when everyone was an employer). There has been no boasting about our social workers-they are merely signs of the system’s failure, of opportunity denied or not taken, of things to be eliminated. We have no pride in our growing interdependence, in the fact that our system can serve others, that we are able to help those in need; empty boasts from the past make us ashamed of our present achievements, make us try to forget or deny them, move away from them. There is no honor but in the Wonderland race we must all run, all trying to win, none winning in the end (for there is no end).
    I was asked by PM to respond. Here's how I approach RC:

    On my first reading, I try only to get the big idea of each paragraph and the tone and the purpose of the passage:

    Paragraph 1:
    In America the old view of ownership is less important; each person can make his own opportunity.

    Paragraph 2:
    Criticizes how America focuses not enough on interdependence and too much on competition.

    When I'm asked about something specific in the passage, I take the following steps:

    1. Find in the passage the window that will contain the answer (usually about 5 lines above to 5 lines below what the question is asking about).
    2. Read carefully.
    3. Try to answer the question in my own words -- before I look at the answer choices.
    4. Look for the answer choice that best matches the way I answered the question for myself.


    Most of the correct answers should support the author's view: that America focuses too much on competition. So let's get some points!

    1. The primary purpose of the passage is to. To criticize America for being too focused on competition.

    (A) criticize the inflexibility of American economic mythology.
    (B) contrast “Old World” and “New World” economic ideologies
    (C) challenge the integrity of traditional political leaders
    (D) champion those Americans whom the author deems to be neglected
    (E) suggest a substitute for the traditional metaphor of a race

    2. According to the passage, “Old World” values were based on: ownership

    (A) ability
    (B) property = ownership
    (C) family connections
    (D) guild hierarchies
    (E) education

    3. In the context of the author’s discussion of regulating change, which of the following could be most probably regarded as a “strong referee” (line 30) in the United States? Someone to give them a strong position in the race...a regulative hand...an authority..

    (A) A school principal
    (B) A political theorist
    (C) A federal court judge Closest to the description above.
    (D) A social worker
    (E) A government inspector

    4. The author sets off the word “Reform” (line 35) with quotation marks in order to: Reform is "sterile". No "attempt to call off the race". We refuse to change our ways.

    (A) emphasize its departure from the concept of settled possessiveness
    (B) show his support for a systematic program of change
    (C) underscore the flexibility and even amorphousness of United States society
    (D) indicate that the term was one of Wilson’s favorites
    (E) assert that reform in the United States has not been fundamental

    5. It can be inferred from the passage that the author most probably thinks that giving the disenfranchised “a piece
    of the action” (line 38) is: A bad idea. We should be more willing to "call off the race".

    (A) a compassionate, if misdirected, legislative measure
    (B) an example of Americans’ resistance to profound social change
    (C) an innovative program for genuine social reform
    (D) a monument to the efforts of industrial reformers
    (E) a surprisingly “Old World” remedy for social ills

    6. Which of the following metaphors could the author most appropriately use to summarize his own assessment of the American economic system (lines 35-60)? It's a race.

    (A) A windmill
    (B) A waterfall
    (C) A treadmill
    (D) A gyroscope
    (E) A bellows

    7. It can be inferred from the passage that Woodrow Wilson’s ideas about the economic market In our legends, no heroism in being an office clerk or part of the stable work force. Woodrow agreed: he wanted everyone to be an employer, not an employee.

    (A) encouraged those who “make the system work” (lines 45-46)
    (B) perpetuated traditional legends about America
    (C) revealed the prejudices of a man born wealthy
    (D) foreshadowed the stock market crash of 1929
    (E) began a tradition of presidential proclamations on economics

    8. The passage contains information that would answer which of the following questions? Gotta check each one.

    I. What techniques have industrialists used to manipulate a free market? Not discussed. Eliminate A and D.
    II. In what ways are “New World” and “Old World” economic policies similar? Passage says they're different. Eliminate B and E. The correct answer is C.
    III. Has economic policy in the United States tended to reward independent action? No need to check this since we already determined the correct answer, but the passage criticizes America for focusing too much on competition and not enough on interdependence.

    (A) I only
    (B) II only
    (C) III only
    (D) I and II only
    (E) II and III only

    9. Which of the following best expresses the author’s main point? Critical of America for focusing too much on competition.

    (A) Americans’ pride in their jobs continues to give them stamina today.
    (B) The absence of a status quo ante has undermined United States economic structure.
    (C) The free enterprise system has been only a useless concept in the United States. Too strong.
    (D) The myth of the American free enterprise system is seriously flawed. Better.
    (E) Fascination with the ideal of “openness” has made Americans a progressive people.

    Hope this helps!

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