Early mariners from the Vikings to medieval explorers were usually able to find their way if they employed early

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Early mariners from the Vikings to medieval explorers were usually able to find their way if they employed early man-made navigation tools such as rudimentary magnetic compasses, geomagnetic lodestones, astrolabes, first used in classical antiquity, or the sun and stars.

A. geomagnetic lodestones, astrolabes, first used in classical antiquity, or the sun and stars.
B. geomagnetic lodestones, astrolabes, which were first used in classical antiquity, or the sun and stars.
C. geomagnetic lodestones, and astrolabes, first used in classical antiquity, or if they could read the sun and stars.
D. geomagnetic lodestones, or astrolabes, first used in classical antiquity, or the reading of the sun and stars.
E. geomagnetic lodestones, astrolabes, which were first used in classical antiquity, and the sun and stars.


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Option A - Incorrect
Sun and stars are not man-made tools, so, they cannot be among the list of early man-made navigation tools.

Option B - Incorrect
Same as option A above, the sun and stars are not man-made tools.

Option C - Correct
This is correct because if they could make use of the sun and stars can be interpreted as if they could use early man-made navigation tools (the sun and stars are examples of early navigation tools).

Option D - Incorrect
Wrong parallelism; the use of 'or the reading of the sun and stars'

Option E - Incorrect
The use of 'which ' in the option. it's describing the sun and stars as early man-made