UCLA Sociologist: Between 1962 and 2012, the marriage rate (that is the percentage of adult women over 16 who get

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UCLA Sociologist: Between 1962 and 2012, the marriage rate (that is the percentage of adult women over 16 who get married for the first time each year) fell from 110 marriages a year per 1,000 unmarried women to just 37, a stunning 66 percent decline. Given this trend, there will likely be no women getting married for the first time by 2050!

Which of the following, if true, exposes a flaw in the sociologist’s reasoning?


A) The average age of marriage has increased dramatically in the past 20 years.

B) Today’s divorce rates are expected to rise dramatically over the next 40 years.

C) More women are expected to get married for a second and third time in the next 40 years.

D) Many women are deciding to simply live with their partners rather than get married.

E) Marriage is much less likely to occur today for the first time than it was in the 1960’s.


OA A

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Option A - correct
In this option, it says that the marriage age for women is increasing drastically so as long as they are getting married before the accepted age. then the number of women getting married will increase. It caused the flaw of the sociologist's reasoning.

Option B - incorrect
The sentence is out of scope. The main sentence doesn't talk about divorce rates. It only focuses on the marriage rates.

Option C - incorrect
This option supports the sociologist's claim that more women are expected to get married for a second and third time in the coming years.

Option D - incorrect
It supports the sociologist's claim because instead of most women getting married officially, they decided to live with their partners.

Option E - incorrect
This also supports the claim that fewer women are likely to get married by 2050 because it says that marriages are less likely to occur for the first time than in 1960.