The invention of the cotton gin

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The invention of the cotton gin

by vipulgoyal » Fri Mar 27, 2015 7:44 pm
The invention of the cotton gin, being one of the most significant developments of the nineteenth century, had turned cotton cloth into an affordable commodity; it was costly before that.

A. being one of the most significant developments of the nineteenth century, had turned cotton cloth into an affordable commodity; it was costly before that.
B. having been one of the most significant developments of the nineteenth century, turned cotton cloth into an affordable commodity, costly previously.
C. one of the most significant developments of the nineteenth century, turned cotton cloth into an affordable, however costly previously, commodity.
D. one of the most significant developments of the nineteenth century, turned cotton cloth into an affordable commodity, whereas it had previously been costly.
E. being one of the most significant developments of the nineteenth century, turned cotton cloth from a previously costly commodity to an affordable one.

seems like this sc has been subject of debate among Manhattan staff them-self, experts plz let me know what is the antecedent of "it" in option D

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by brianlange77 » Sat Mar 28, 2015 8:38 pm
It's cotton cloth, right? Maybe I am missing something in your question, but that seemed pretty straightforward to me.

Post back if I misinterpreted what you are asking for here.

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by GMATGuruNY » Sun Mar 29, 2015 2:50 am
whereas must serve to introduce a contrasting subordinate clause whose subject can logically be compared to the subject of the main clause.

Official examples:

Whereas LINES OF COMPETITION are clearly defined in the more established industries, in the Internet industry THEY are blurred and indistinct.
Here, it is logical to express a contrast between the subject of the whereas-clause (LINES OF COMPETITION in the more established industries) and the subject of the main clause (LINES OF COMPETITION in the Internet industry).

Whereas in mammals THE TINY TUBES that convey nutrients to bone cells are arrayed in parallel lines, in birds THE TUBES form a random pattern.
Here, it is logical to express a contrast between the subject of the whereas-clause (THE TINY TUBES in mammals) and the subject of the main clause (THE TUBES in birds).
vipulgoyal wrote:seems like this sc has been subject of debate among Manhattan staff them-self, experts plz let me know what is the antecedent of "it" in option D
D: THE INVENTION of the cotton gin turned cotton cloth into an affordable commodity, whereas IT had previously been costly.
Here, a reader might construe that it (subject pronoun) serves to refer to the invention (the preceding subject).
The intended antecedent for it is cotton cloth.
Regardless, it seems illogical to express a contrast between the intended subject of the whereas-clause (COTTON CLOTH) and the subject of the main clause (THE INVENTION).
I would ignore this SC.
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