Is work experience inevitable for being admitted ?

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I am presently a student of engineering, in the last year and not interested going for a job,so planning for pursuing a full time 2 year MBA program from a top business school. After being through the websites of the universities, I have got to know that applicants with strong post undergraduate work experience are preferred. So, should I go for a job or start preparing for an MBA school?

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by [email protected] » Fri Aug 07, 2015 8:15 am
Generally, you are going to want to get some work experience. Not only will it increase your chances of getting into a quality program, but it will also greatly enhance your experience at school. There are programs, such as Harvards 2+2, that you can apply for now, but there are not many of these that I would recommend.
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by prakhar1 » Fri Aug 07, 2015 9:50 am
Actually, I am not interested in going for a job . Can you give me details of Harvard's 2+2 program?
And aren't there universities admitting candidates without work experience?

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by [email protected] » Fri Aug 07, 2015 10:00 am
Here is the 2 + 2: https://www.hbs.edu/mba/admissions/appli ... cants.aspx

Although you still will have to work. The reason for work experience is that you need to engage in real life problems before you think about how to solve them. Classes are engaging and it is as much about what experiences people can share with their classmates as it is about learning information from textbooks.
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by prakhar1 » Fri Aug 07, 2015 8:38 pm
Thanks Jim for giving me the required details. Also, I would like to ask you what could be the chances of my getting into the 2+2 program if I apply?
And how much do I need to score in the required tests so as to mark my qualities before them aside hundreds of applications worldwide?

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by [email protected] » Sat Sep 12, 2015 2:39 pm
The 2+2 program is very small and very, very competitive. Think about it, HBS is giving you an acceptance before you've proven yourself in your career. I wouldn't bank on this as your option. Why don't you want to look for a job? Even if you do get into business school with no experience, you'll have to look for a job in two years after the program anyway. And more likely one year to get an internship.

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by Kaneisha Grayson » Mon Sep 14, 2015 2:35 pm
Hi Prakhar,

I'm going to add to the good advice you've already received but say it a bit more "in your face" (but with love): Going to graduate school to avoid or postpone the real world and/or the job market is not a good idea at all.

I was admitted to Harvard Business School to their Deferred Admits program back in 2006 when I was a senior in college (My class actually named it 2+2). I wasn't looking to defer the real world; I just knew I wanted to go to business school and I also knew I was the kind of wild card nontraditional student who may never go to business school if I didn't "lock it in" early. I provide this information to give you a perspective from someone who applied to business school while I was very young (21-22).

You haven't said why you are not interested in getting a job, and I don't mean to make assumptions about your intentions, but it seems like you may be trying to use business school as a way to avoid the job search process. Business school is a professional degree, the main point of which is to advance your career.

You need to convey a clear, confident vision of your career in the short-term and the long-term in your application essays. MBA admissions committees will be able to see right through disingenuous statements about what you hope to do with your career, and your essays will come across as confused, wandering, vague, and/or empty if you haven't actually taken the time to reflect upon what you really want to do in your personal and professional life.

Maybe I'm wrong and you have a whole other reason why you aren't "interested in going for a job." With an engineering degree, I would think you'd be well positioned to find an entry-level job. It's great that you're thinking about business school this early, but you won't have a strong chance of getting into top 25 programs if you aren't able to convey a passion for some kind of work. And one of the best ways to figure out what you do and don't like is to have a job or three and take note of what you like, what you hate, and what you hope to experience more of.

I hope that was helpful!

Kaneisha
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by [email protected] » Sat Oct 24, 2015 9:55 am
Personally I would always recommend getting some work experience first. One, schools will definitely give you credit for the experience and it will make you a better candidate and student when you do get to school. Secondly, if you don't want a job now, why will your opinion change in two years? You'll be in the same boat with way more in student loans to pay back. Schools and employers really want people who have a vision for their career, I would suggest you really consider your career options and what you want to do fbefore jumping back into school.

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by [email protected] » Sat Oct 24, 2015 9:56 am
Personally I would always recommend getting some work experience first. One, schools will definitely give you credit for the experience and it will make you a better candidate and student when you do get to school. Secondly, if you don't want a job now, why will your opinion change in two years? You'll be in the same boat with way more in student loans to pay back. Schools and employers really want people who have a vision for their career, I would suggest you really consider your career options and what you want to do before jumping back into school.

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by [email protected] » Sat Oct 24, 2015 10:00 am
Personally I would always recommend getting some work experience first. One, schools will definitely give you credit for the experience and it will make you a better candidate and student when you do get to school. Secondly, if you don't want a job now, why will your opinion change in two years? You'll be in the same boat with way more in student loans to pay back. Schools and employers really want people who have a vision for their career, I would suggest you really consider your career options and what you want to do before jumping back into school.