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Analyzing practice test

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Analyzing practice test

by bourneJ » Sun Mar 25, 2012 5:37 pm
HI,
I was wondering if there any efficient way to analyze my test results. Does knewton provide any tools to check which topics did I get specifically wrong. I know that I could look at the topics of the questions I got wrong. But that is not really efficient way to find out if I got the same style of questions wrong in successive practice tests.
Thanks

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by Jen@VeritasPrep » Tue Mar 27, 2012 12:19 pm
Hi bournej,

There's not a way to view commonly missed concepts across the practice tests, but the Progress tab shows your mastery by concept and is a helpful tool to organize your study. If you click on the bars in the bar graphs, you'll be taken to other graphs that break down your strengths/weaknesses at an increasingly granular level.

In terms of the test, as you mentioned it's very easy to open individual tests and see the relevant concepts for each question. As you're analyzing your results, start by looking for high-level patterns (do you struggle with SC far more than with CR/RC, etc.). Then you can use the concepts to drill down even further -- for example, within sentence correction, are you missing lots of modifier questions? This can feel time consuming, but it's time well spent! Thoroughly reviewing your test results to determine WHY you missed each question is one of the most valuable study habits to develop.

Hope that helps!
Jen Rugani
GMAT Instructor, Veritas Prep
www.veritasprep.com

Junior | Next Rank: 30 Posts
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by bourneJ » Wed Mar 28, 2012 5:56 am
Hi Jen,
Thanks for the reply. I was looking at progress tab to identify which areas are problematic. I noticed that for some of the topics the score is 0%(ex: monomials, binomials ). And secondly what does % indicate? Is it the number of questions I got right answers for in my practice test or practice questions? Or the contents covered in the course?

How do i practice for topics which have low percentage? Or find out where I 'm going wrong?
Thanks

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by Jen@VeritasPrep » Tue Apr 03, 2012 6:22 am
A bar at 0% could mean one of two things: you haven't seen any of the content in that topic yet, or you haven't yet gotten any of those practice questions correct. The percentages feed in from the homework assignments -- for topics in which you're struggling, it's your job to start reviewing! Go back to the relevant sessions, homework assignments and extra practice problems. Review the questions you've missed and ask yourself: Why did I think that the wrong answer was correct? Where was my error in reasoning or understanding? Why is the correct answer correct? What can I take from this question that I can apply to others like it? You should apply the same process to your CAT results. Go through and do a thorough review of your missed items AND any items that were difficult for you (don't give yourself credit for a lucky guess!).

It's far more helpful for you to identify your own weaknesses and patterns of reasoning than for a computer to do it for you. This is not a short, easy process, and it's not supposed to be! The review process that you're describing is really where the majority of your work as a GMAT student should take place.

Good luck and happy studying!
Jen Rugani
GMAT Instructor, Veritas Prep
www.veritasprep.com

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