An office comprised of eight employees is planning to have a foosball game. A matchup consists of four players, split in

This topic has expert replies
Moderator
Posts: 6242
Joined: 07 Sep 2017
Followed by:20 members

Timer

00:00

Your Answer

A

B

C

D

E

Global Stats

An office comprised of eight employees is planning to have a foosball game. A matchup consists of four players, split into pairs. If any employee can be paired up with any other employee, then how many unique matchups result?

(A) 70

(B) 210

(C) 280

(D) 336

(E) 420



OA B

Source: Magoosh

GMAT/MBA Expert

User avatar
GMAT Instructor
Posts: 15949
Joined: 08 Dec 2008
Location: Vancouver, BC
Thanked: 5254 times
Followed by:1267 members
GMAT Score:770
BTGmoderatorDC wrote:
Thu Nov 25, 2021 12:18 am
An office comprised of eight employees is planning to have a foosball game. A matchup consists of four players, split into pairs. If any employee can be paired up with any other employee, then how many unique matchups result?

(A) 70

(B) 210

(C) 280

(D) 336

(E) 420



OA B

Source: Magoosh
Take the task of creating a matchup and break it into stages.

Stage 1: Select 4 employees
Since the order in which we select the employees does not matter, we can use combinations.
We can select 4 employees from 8 employees in 8C5 ways (70 ways)
So, we can complete stage 1 in 70 ways

Stage 2: Divide the 4 selected employees into 2 teams
Let's say the 4 selected employees are A, B, C, D
A nice way to determine the number of ways to divide the 4 employees into 2 teams is to find a partner for one person.
For example, let's find a partner for employee A.
NOTE: once we choose a partner for employee A then, by default, the remaining two two employees will be paired together.
In how many ways can we select a partner for employee A? Well, A can be paired with B, C or D
So, we can complete stage 2 in 3 ways

ASIDE: The 3 pairings are:
AB vs CD
AC vs BD
AD vs BC

By the Fundamental Counting Principle (FCP), we can complete the 2 stages (and thus create a matchup) in (70)(3) ways (= 210 ways)

Answer: B

Note: the FCP can be used to solve the MAJORITY of counting questions on the GMAT. For more information about the FCP, watch this video: https://www.gmatprepnow.com/module/gmat- ... /video/775

You can also watch a demonstration of the FCP in action: https://www.gmatprepnow.com/module/gmat ... /video/776

Then you can try solving the following questions:

EASY
- https://www.beatthegmat.com/what-should- ... 67256.html
- https://www.beatthegmat.com/counting-pro ... 44302.html
- https://www.beatthegmat.com/picking-a-5- ... 73110.html
- https://www.beatthegmat.com/permutation- ... 57412.html
- https://www.beatthegmat.com/simple-one-t270061.html


MEDIUM
- https://www.beatthegmat.com/combinatoric ... 73194.html
- https://www.beatthegmat.com/arabian-hors ... 50703.html
- https://www.beatthegmat.com/sub-sets-pro ... 73337.html
- https://www.beatthegmat.com/combinatoric ... 73180.html
- https://www.beatthegmat.com/digits-numbers-t270127.html
- https://www.beatthegmat.com/doubt-on-sep ... 71047.html
- https://www.beatthegmat.com/combinatoric ... 67079.html


DIFFICULT
- https://www.beatthegmat.com/wonderful-p- ... 71001.html
- https://www.beatthegmat.com/permutation- ... 73915.html
- https://www.beatthegmat.com/permutation-t122873.html
- https://www.beatthegmat.com/no-two-ladie ... 75661.html
- https://www.beatthegmat.com/combinations-t123249.html


Cheers,
Brent
Brent Hanneson - Creator of GMATPrepNow.com
Image