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Saffir-Simpson Scale

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TedCornell Master | Next Rank: 500 Posts Default Avatar
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Post Sat Mar 28, 2009 6:46 pm
I'm not sure I agree with Manhattan's explanation for why D is incorrect; I hope I never run into this dilemma on the GMAT: the distinction in meaning between "high enough to" and "so high that"

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blackarrow Master | Next Rank: 500 Posts Default Avatar
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Post Sat Mar 28, 2009 7:27 pm
Hi Ted,

Even I got the answer wrong the first time I did the question, and it was a new learning to find the difference between 'so high as' and 'high enough to'.

However, If the verbatim explaination is'nt satisfactory, let the experts do the job!

and BTW- keep up with the awesome job of ur SC explainations!

_________________
Its better to burn out than to fade away

TedCornell Master | Next Rank: 500 Posts Default Avatar
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Post Sat Mar 28, 2009 8:32 pm
thank you Smile

Anaira Mitch Master | Next Rank: 500 Posts
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Post Tue Sep 19, 2017 6:27 am
OE :

When referring to y as the potential outcome of x, the correct idiom is “x’s potential to y.” This
sentence incorrectly phrases the idiom as “a hurricane’s potential of destroying or damaging.” When
referring to the use of y to determine x, the correct idiom is “x is determined by y.” This sentence
incorrectly phrases the idiom as “potential … is determined from wind speeds.” Finally, there is a
subtle distinction between the idiom "so x as to y" and “x is enough to y.” The original sentence uses
the idiom "so x as to y" to indicate that characteristic x is so extreme in the particular case that y
results. In contrast, the idiom "x is enough to y" is used when x is the criteria by which an ability to
achieve y is measured. Thus, if a sentence stated that "a category 5 storm has wind speeds high
enough to blow away small buildings," this would convey a different meaning: that wind speeds are
the criteria by which one measures the ability to blow away small houses.

(A) This choice is incorrect as it repeats the original sentence.

(B) When referring to the use of y to determine x, the correct idiom is “x is determined by y.” This
sentence incorrectly phrases the idiom as “potential … is determined from wind speeds.” The change
from the original idiom "wind speeds so high as to..." to the idiom presented in this sentence “high
enough to...” changes the original meaning of the sentence; it conveys that wind speeds are the
criteria by which one measures the ability to blow away small houses. The idiom "so x as to y" is
required instead to match the original meaning: that characteristic x (the wind speed) is so extreme in
the particular case (a category 5 storm) that y results (small houses are blown away).

(C) When referring to y as the potential outcome of x, the correct idiom is “x’s potential to y.” This
sentence incorrectly phrases the idiom as “a hurricane’s potential of destroying or damaging.”

(D) The idiom “high enough to blow away small buildings” changes the original meaning; it conveys
that wind speeds are the criteria by which one measures the ability to blow away small houses. The
idiom "so x as to y" is required instead to match the original meaning: that characteristic x (the wind
speed) is so extreme in the particular case (a category 5 storm) that y results (small houses are blown
away).

(E) CORRECT. All idioms in the sentence are used correctly.

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