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Physician

This topic has 3 expert replies and 7 member replies
maihuna Legendary Member Default Avatar
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Physician

Post Thu Dec 10, 2009 12:50 pm
In Kantovia, physicians’ income comes from insurance companies, which require
physicians to document their decisions in treating patients and to justify deviations
from the companies’ treatment guidelines. Ten years ago physicians were allowed
more discretion. Most physicians believe that the companies’ requirements now
prevent them from spending enough time with patients. Yet the average amount of
time a patient spends with a physician during an office visit has actually increased
somewhat over the last ten years.
Which of the following, if true, most helps to resolve the apparent discrepancy
between physicians’ perceptions and the change in the actual time spent?
A. Patients are more likely to be in a hurry nowadays and are less willing to
wait a long time to see their physician.
B. Physicians today typically have a wider range of options in diagnosis and
treatment to consider with the patient before prescribing.
C. Physicians are increasingly likely to work in group practices, sharing the
responsibility of night and weekend work.
D. Most patients would rather trust their physicians than their insurance
companies to make decisions about their treatment.
E. Since the insurance companies pay physicians a set amount for each
office visit, it is to physicians’ financial advantage to see as many
Patients as possible.

B vs E are close contender, why B?

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Testluv GMAT Instructor Default Avatar
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Post Fri Dec 25, 2009 10:11 am
mmslf75 wrote:
Testluv wrote:
What part are you unclear on?

The paradox is that now doctors are spending more time per patient even though they feel they feel as though they are now spending less time per patient (than they used to). Choice B resolves because it tells us that with technological advances, doctors now have to spend more time per patient in order to feel as though they are doing their job. So this explains why they feel as though they are not spending as much time even though they are actually spending more time.
Understood why B is right ! Thanks

for E,

do u mean that ?!!

Maximise Profits ---> More Patients ---> Less Time

Argument says,
Yet,.... MORE time

CONTRADICTION

Therfore, fuhget abt E..


Right ???
Yes, that's right.

A couple comments. Paradoxes are not arguments; it will be easier to deal with a paradox question without thinking about conclusion, etc because there is no conclusion etc. Instead, in paradox you get a set of facts out of whose combination arises a paradox.

Also, choice E is an example of a very common wrong answer type; they do the opposite of what we want; we can call them opposite or 180s.

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veenu08 Master | Next Rank: 500 Posts Default Avatar
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Post Sat Nov 16, 2013 12:14 am
can someone please explain how to rule out c. since here its mentioned that " patient spends with a physician during an office visit has actually increased somewhat ", so if we go with C then cant we conclude that since the doctors average out their time, hence the average time they spend becomes less than, what they actually spends.

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Testluv GMAT Instructor Default Avatar
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Post Fri Dec 25, 2009 10:11 am
mmslf75 wrote:
Testluv wrote:
What part are you unclear on?

The paradox is that now doctors are spending more time per patient even though they feel they feel as though they are now spending less time per patient (than they used to). Choice B resolves because it tells us that with technological advances, doctors now have to spend more time per patient in order to feel as though they are doing their job. So this explains why they feel as though they are not spending as much time even though they are actually spending more time.
Understood why B is right ! Thanks

for E,

do u mean that ?!!

Maximise Profits ---> More Patients ---> Less Time

Argument says,
Yet,.... MORE time

CONTRADICTION

Therfore, fuhget abt E..


Right ???
Yes, that's right.

A couple comments. Paradoxes are not arguments; it will be easier to deal with a paradox question without thinking about conclusion, etc because there is no conclusion etc. Instead, in paradox you get a set of facts out of whose combination arises a paradox.

Also, choice E is an example of a very common wrong answer type; they do the opposite of what we want; we can call them opposite or 180s.

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veenu08 Master | Next Rank: 500 Posts Default Avatar
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Post Sat Nov 16, 2013 12:14 am
can someone please explain how to rule out c. since here its mentioned that " patient spends with a physician during an office visit has actually increased somewhat ", so if we go with C then cant we conclude that since the doctors average out their time, hence the average time they spend becomes less than, what they actually spends.

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sinhap07 Junior | Next Rank: 30 Posts Default Avatar
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Post Thu Oct 19, 2017 1:29 am
Testluv wrote:
maihuna wrote:
In Kantovia, physicians’ income comes from insurance companies, which require
physicians to document their decisions in treating patients and to justify deviations
from the companies’ treatment guidelines. Ten years ago physicians were allowed
more discretion. Most physicians believe that the companies’ requirements now
prevent them from spending enough time with patients. Yet the average amount of
time a patient spends with a physician during an office visit has actually increased
somewhat over the last ten years.
Which of the following, if true, most helps to resolve the apparent discrepancy
between physicians’ perceptions and the change in the actual time spent?
A. Patients are more likely to be in a hurry nowadays and are less willing to
wait a long time to see their physician.
B. Physicians today typically have a wider range of options in diagnosis and
treatment to consider with the patient before prescribing.
C. Physicians are increasingly likely to work in group practices, sharing the
responsibility of night and weekend work.
D. Most patients would rather trust their physicians than their insurance
companies to make decisions about their treatment.
E. Since the insurance companies pay physicians a set amount for each
office visit, it is to physicians’ financial advantage to see as many
Patients as possible.

B vs E are close contender, why B?
Hi Maihuna,

In paradox questions, look for a contrast keyword like "yet", "but" or "however"; it will center the paradox. Before going to the answer choices, make sure you understand the paradox (the surprise) and why its paradoxical (why its surprising).

The last sentence begins with "yet". That means that we can understand the paradox by contrasting the final two sentences against each other. The paradox can be summed up as: "most physicians belive they have less time per patient yet they are actually spending more time per patient".

Then, choice B clearly resolves: because they have a so many more treatment options in diagnosis and treatment, naturally, physicians will need more time diagnose and treat a particular patient; so even though they are spending more time they believe (ie, feel) as though they are spending less time.

Choice E is a common trap in paradox questions; it is called a 180 or opposite. As Kabir points out if physicians want to minimize the time spent per patient (to maximize their dollars), they will spend less and not more time; but the last sentence tells us that they are actually spending more time per patient. So, choice E tends to oppose the facts presented in the passage. Also, if choice E were true, it would not lie well in the physicians' mouths to say that because of the new requirements they feel as though they have less time; instead, it would be because of their desire to maximize dollars.
Hi

Not very sure about this question. No where is it mentioned that diagnosing and treating are not part of the time spent with the patients. Then how can we assume it? It is very much part of the time spent with the patient. Pls clarify.

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divineacclivity Senior | Next Rank: 100 Posts Default Avatar
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Post Mon Jun 02, 2014 1:14 am
Dear Expert,

Why is C in correct an option?
If physicians are group-practicing, they're each spending lesser time per time a patient but a summed up time a patient spends with physician(s) (time with doc1 + time with doc3 + ...) is more. So, that also resolves the paradox. No? Please tell me why not. Thanks in advance.

C: Physicians are increasingly likely to work in group practices, sharing the responsibility of night and weekend work.

Testluv wrote:
maihuna wrote:
In Kantovia, physicians’ income comes from insurance companies, which require
physicians to document their decisions in treating patients and to justify deviations
from the companies’ treatment guidelines. Ten years ago physicians were allowed
more discretion. Most physicians believe that the companies’ requirements now
prevent them from spending enough time with patients. Yet the average amount of
time a patient spends with a physician during an office visit has actually increased
somewhat over the last ten years.
Which of the following, if true, most helps to resolve the apparent discrepancy
between physicians’ perceptions and the change in the actual time spent?
A. Patients are more likely to be in a hurry nowadays and are less willing to
wait a long time to see their physician.
B. Physicians today typically have a wider range of options in diagnosis and
treatment to consider with the patient before prescribing.
C. Physicians are increasingly likely to work in group practices, sharing the
responsibility of night and weekend work.
D. Most patients would rather trust their physicians than their insurance
companies to make decisions about their treatment.
E. Since the insurance companies pay physicians a set amount for each
office visit, it is to physicians’ financial advantage to see as many
Patients as possible.

B vs E are close contender, why B?
Hi Maihuna,

In paradox questions, look for a contrast keyword like "yet", "but" or "however"; it will center the paradox. Before going to the answer choices, make sure you understand the paradox (the surprise) and why its paradoxical (why its surprising).

The last sentence begins with "yet". That means that we can understand the paradox by contrasting the final two sentences against each other. The paradox can be summed up as: "most physicians belive they have less time per patient yet they are actually spending more time per patient".

Then, choice B clearly resolves: because they have a so many more treatment options in diagnosis and treatment, naturally, physicians will need more time diagnose and treat a particular patient; so even though they are spending more time they believe (ie, feel) as though they are spending less time.

Choice E is a common trap in paradox questions; it is called a 180 or opposite. As Kabir points out if physicians want to minimize the time spent per patient (to maximize their dollars), they will spend less and not more time; but the last sentence tells us that they are actually spending more time per patient. So, choice E tends to oppose the facts presented in the passage. Also, if choice E were true, it would not lie well in the physicians' mouths to say that because of the new requirements they feel as though they have less time; instead, it would be because of their desire to maximize dollars.

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mmslf75 Legendary Member Default Avatar
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Post Fri Dec 25, 2009 9:56 am
Testluv wrote:
What part are you unclear on?

The paradox is that now doctors are spending more time per patient even though they feel they feel as though they are now spending less time per patient (than they used to). Choice B resolves because it tells us that with technological advances, doctors now have to spend more time per patient in order to feel as though they are doing their job. So this explains why they feel as though they are not spending as much time even though they are actually spending more time.
Understood why B is right ! Thanks

for E,

do u mean that ?!!

Maximise Profits ---> More Patients ---> Less Time

Argument says,
Yet,.... MORE time

CONTRADICTION

Therfore, fuhget abt E..


Right ???

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GMAT/MBA Expert

Testluv GMAT Instructor Default Avatar
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Post Fri Dec 25, 2009 9:43 am
What part are you unclear on?

The paradox is that now doctors are spending more time per patient even though they feel they feel as though they are now spending less time per patient (than they used to). Choice B resolves because it tells us that with technological advances, doctors now have to spend more time per patient in order to feel as though they are doing their job. So this explains why they feel as though they are not spending as much time even though they are actually spending more time.

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mmslf75 Legendary Member Default Avatar
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Post Fri Dec 25, 2009 9:32 am
Testluv wrote:
maihuna wrote:
In Kantovia, physicians’ income comes from insurance companies, which require
physicians to document their decisions in treating patients and to justify deviations
from the companies’ treatment guidelines. Ten years ago physicians were allowed
more discretion. Most physicians believe that the companies’ requirements now
prevent them from spending enough time with patients. Yet the average amount of
time a patient spends with a physician during an office visit has actually increased
somewhat over the last ten years.
Which of the following, if true, most helps to resolve the apparent discrepancy
between physicians’ perceptions and the change in the actual time spent?
A. Patients are more likely to be in a hurry nowadays and are less willing to
wait a long time to see their physician.
B. Physicians today typically have a wider range of options in diagnosis and
treatment to consider with the patient before prescribing.
C. Physicians are increasingly likely to work in group practices, sharing the
responsibility of night and weekend work.
D. Most patients would rather trust their physicians than their insurance
companies to make decisions about their treatment.
E. Since the insurance companies pay physicians a set amount for each
office visit, it is to physicians’ financial advantage to see as many
Patients as possible.

B vs E are close contender, why B?
Hi Maihuna,

In paradox questions, look for a contrast keyword like "yet", "but" or "however"; it will center the paradox. Before going to the answer choices, make sure you understand the paradox (the surprise) and why its paradoxical (why its surprising).

The last sentence begins with "yet". That means that we can understand the paradox by contrasting the final two sentences against each other. The paradox can be summed up as: "most physicians belive they have less time per patient yet they are actually spending more time per patient".

Then, choice B clearly resolves: because they have a so many more treatment options in diagnosis and treatment, naturally, physicians will need more time diagnose and treat a particular patient; so even though they are spending more time they believe (ie, feel) as though they are spending less time.

Choice E is a common trap in paradox questions; it is called a 180 or opposite. As Kabir points out if physicians want to minimize the time spent per patient (to maximize their dollars), they will spend less and not more time; but the last sentence tells us that they are actually spending more time per patient. So, choice E tends to oppose the facts presented in the passage. Also, if choice E were true, it would not lie well in the physicians' mouths to say that because of the new requirements they feel as though they have less time; instead, it would be because of their desire to maximize dollars.
Help on this pleasse !!

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maihuna Legendary Member Default Avatar
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Post Sat Dec 12, 2009 5:02 am
Thanks TestLuv,
Got it.

Thanks again.

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