• PrepScholar GMAT
    5 Day FREE Trial
    Study Smarter, Not Harder

    Available with Beat the GMAT members only code

    MORE DETAILS
    PrepScholar GMAT
  • e-gmat Exclusive Offer
    Get 300+ Practice Questions
    25 Video lessons and 6 Webinars for FREE

    Available with Beat the GMAT members only code

    MORE DETAILS
    e-gmat Exclusive Offer
  • Veritas Prep
    Free Veritas GMAT Class
    Experience Lesson 1 Live Free

    Available with Beat the GMAT members only code

    MORE DETAILS
    Veritas Prep
  • Economist Test Prep
    Free Trial & Practice Exam
    BEAT THE GMAT EXCLUSIVE

    Available with Beat the GMAT members only code

    MORE DETAILS
    Economist Test Prep
  • Target Test Prep
    5-Day Free Trial
    5-day free, full-access trial TTP Quant

    Available with Beat the GMAT members only code

    MORE DETAILS
    Target Test Prep
  • Kaplan Test Prep
    Free Practice Test & Review
    How would you score if you took the GMAT

    Available with Beat the GMAT members only code

    MORE DETAILS
    Kaplan Test Prep
  • Magoosh
    Magoosh
    Study with Magoosh GMAT prep

    Available with Beat the GMAT members only code

    MORE DETAILS
    Magoosh
  • EMPOWERgmat Slider
    1 Hour Free
    BEAT THE GMAT EXCLUSIVE

    Available with Beat the GMAT members only code

    MORE DETAILS
    EMPOWERgmat Slider
  • Varsity Tutors
    Award-winning private GMAT tutoring
    Register now and save up to $200

    Available with Beat the GMAT members only code

    MORE DETAILS
    Varsity Tutors

Papgust's GMAT SENTENCE CORRECTION FLASHCARDS directory

This topic has 8 expert replies and 339 member replies
Goto page Previous Next
simone88 Senior | Next Rank: 100 Posts Default Avatar
Joined
22 Apr 2012
Posted:
87 messages
Thanked:
2 times
Post Tue May 08, 2012 6:58 am
papgust wrote:
--[IMPORTANT]--

"Would" Vs "Will":


"Would" is the past tense of "Will".

(i) If you are talking about predicting or expecting an event that still lies in the future, then you use "WILL".


(ii) If you are talking about a PAST PREDICTION or expectation of an event whose timeframe has ALREADY PASSED, then you use "WOULD".



Courtesy: Ron Purewal, GMAT Expert.
could you, please, make an example with the use of will?

Need free GMAT or MBA advice from an expert? Register for Beat The GMAT now and post your question in these forums!
subratdash24 Newbie | Next Rank: 10 Posts Default Avatar
Joined
01 May 2012
Posted:
4 messages
Post Fri May 18, 2012 1:00 pm
HI All,

I have one basic doubt in finding the noun in the below sentence, can anybody please help me what are the nouns in this sentence below

" Keli's ambition is to win the state lottery"

Best Regards,
Subrat

GMAT/MBA Expert

lunarpower GMAT Instructor
Joined
03 Mar 2008
Posted:
3380 messages
Followed by:
1474 members
Thanked:
2255 times
GMAT Score:
800
Post Sat May 19, 2012 9:48 pm
i received a private message about some of the questions in this thread.


1/

Quote:
could you, please, give me some example? because I don't understand what ESSENTIAL mean
--> if you have a question about general definitions, the best thing to do is to google the topic.
so, if you are interested in the distinction between "essential" and "non-essential" modifiers (a distinction that is NOT explicitly tested on the gmat, by the way), just type any of the following into google...
essential modifier
nonessential modifier
essential modifier english
nonessential modifier english

... into google and read the many pages that come up.


--

2/

simone88 wrote:
papgust wrote:
"twice as many as":


"..., twice as many as ..." is an APPOSITIVE modifier. Appositives must modify some noun that comes immediately before the comma.

NOTE:
If you have an appositive modifier as an ABSTRACT NOUN - such as "strategy", "figure", "statistic", "findings", "situation", "change", "difference" etc. - then such an appositive may be allowed to describe the entire situation described in the preceding clause
Could you, please, make some example of the note?
thx
check out the correct answer to SC #83 in OG 12th edition.
in that sentence, "phenomenon" (an abstract term) is used to describe the entire idea of the clause that precedes it.

more examples here:
http://www.beatthegmat.com/modifier-confusion-t10582.html#366042

--

3/

Quote:
since that I don't know what a prepositional phrase is, could you, please, explain me it making me some other example?
type "prepositional phrase" into google, and read a bunch of the pages that come up.

--

4/

you asked about "could"

read here:
http://www.beatthegmat.com/a-tense-problem-t72364.html#327988

--

5/

covered in the same link i gave you for #4.

_________________
Ron has been teaching various standardized tests for 20 years.

--

Pueden hacerle preguntas a Ron en castellano
Potete chiedere domande a Ron in italiano
On peut poser des questions à Ron en français
Voit esittää kysymyksiä Ron:lle myös suomeksi

--

Quand on se sent bien dans un vêtement, tout peut arriver. Un bon vêtement, c'est un passeport pour le bonheur.

Yves Saint-Laurent

--

Learn more about ron

Free Manhattan Prep online events - The first class of every online Manhattan Prep course is free. Classes start every week.
Puja3838 Newbie | Next Rank: 10 Posts Default Avatar
Joined
25 Apr 2012
Posted:
2 messages
Post Tue May 29, 2012 2:13 pm
Dear Papgust,

First of all, thank you so much for such a wonderful notes...I find it very useful.

I have 1 doubt and wanted to clear my concept -

In SC part - Page 16 - Verb Phrase Ellipsis - Says that you can omit verb comparators when you use a comparison using "than" or "as"

Page 21 - Comparison of action - here also we are using "than" to compare, still we cant omit "do"

Could you please help me to understand the difference?

Thanks for your help
TC

suavesin Newbie | Next Rank: 10 Posts Default Avatar
Joined
03 Oct 2011
Posted:
7 messages
Post Tue May 29, 2012 7:55 pm
ttp://postimage.org/image/day3moa05/" target="_blank">
Just wanted to add this to the list.starters who might get confused with S-V agreement can just refer this page. I found it on a site and thought its pretty useful for starters.

bek_gmat Junior | Next Rank: 30 Posts Default Avatar
Joined
17 Jul 2008
Posted:
28 messages
Test Date:
11-Oct-2011
Target GMAT Score:
550
GMAT Score:
600
Post Tue Jun 12, 2012 10:18 am
Papgust,

first of all, thanks for the effort and helpful flashcards! I was reading and came across to something odd. You mentioned "that" can modify people/things, but Manhattan strategy book says we cannot use That to modify people.

So can you give us your source. And maybe we need third person's opinion on this.

hey_thr67 Master | Next Rank: 500 Posts Default Avatar
Joined
15 Feb 2011
Posted:
299 messages
Followed by:
2 members
Thanked:
9 times
Post Fri Jun 22, 2012 10:24 am
Read all the posts. Your doubt has been answered in the post by Ron. manhattan is right ...

Suz Senior | Next Rank: 100 Posts Default Avatar
Joined
02 Jul 2012
Posted:
39 messages
Post Wed Jul 11, 2012 7:12 am
Yes! Please continue-- these flashcards are great

swaroop Newbie | Next Rank: 10 Posts Default Avatar
Joined
01 Nov 2011
Posted:
1 messages
Post Mon Jul 16, 2012 2:54 am
Hi,

Could someone tell me what is the difference between 'Native Of' & 'Native To' ?
It would be helpful if the concept is explained with an example.

-
swp

bubbliiiiiiii Legendary Member
Joined
14 Apr 2009
Posted:
971 messages
Followed by:
12 members
Thanked:
48 times
Test Date:
18.10.2012
Target GMAT Score:
760
GMAT Score:
700
Post Mon Jul 16, 2012 3:00 am
swaroop wrote:
Hi,

Could someone tell me what is the difference between 'Native Of' & 'Native To' ?
It would be helpful if the concept is explained with an example.

-
swp
Native of - Is used when you are describe the origin of something.

Native to - Is used to describe about the current state.

Ex:

I am native of Rajasthan, India.
I am native to Andhra Pradesh, India.

The above two statements mean, Although I am born in Andhra Pradesh, India, my family originated in Rajasthan, India.

Hope it helps.

Experts/fellow bloggers, please correct in case my understanding is improper.

_________________
Regards,

Pranay

Post Wed Jul 18, 2012 7:25 am
papgust wrote:
-- IMPORTANT --

Myth of "One of.."


1. One of the X's that/who
2. One of the X's
3. Only one of the X's
4. Only one of the X's that/who
5. The only one of the X's that/who

Thank you so much for providing such wonderful flashcards. They r really very helpful.
Can u please explain the above mentioned point in detail with examples or please give the link from where u quoted this.

Courtesy: Ron Purewal, GMAT Expert.

sunder_710 Newbie | Next Rank: 10 Posts
Joined
10 Aug 2012
Posted:
4 messages
Post Tue Aug 14, 2012 8:34 pm
Hey Papgust...I am following your thread..pls dont feel demoralised...continue posting..your work is greatly appreciated..

hemant_rajput Master | Next Rank: 500 Posts
Joined
22 Apr 2012
Posted:
447 messages
Followed by:
13 members
Thanked:
46 times
Test Date:
25/08/2014
GMAT Score:
700
Post Sat Jan 26, 2013 10:50 am
papgust wrote:
If-Then Clause Rules:


ttp://www.postimage.org/" target="_blank">

Examples:
If John arrives, we will start -- Present (If Clause). WILL + Base Verb (Then Clause).
If John arrived, we would start -- Past (If Clause). Would + Base Verb (Then Clause).
If John had arrived, we would have started -- Past Perfect (If Clause). Would + HAVE + Past Participle (Then Clause).


Key Points to Remember:

1. "Would" and "Could NEVER appear in the IF Clause.
2. The verb "was" NEVER appears in the IF Clause because of subjunctive mood.
what about this sentence, "If you could do that, it would be great."

_________________
I'm no expert, just trying to work on my skills. If I've made any mistakes please bear with me.

hemant_rajput Master | Next Rank: 500 Posts
Joined
22 Apr 2012
Posted:
447 messages
Followed by:
13 members
Thanked:
46 times
Test Date:
25/08/2014
GMAT Score:
700
Post Sat Jan 26, 2013 11:53 am
papgust wrote:
"twice as many as":


"..., twice as many as ..." is an APPOSITIVE modifier. Appositives must modify some noun that comes immediately before the comma.

NOTE:
If you have an appositive modifier as an ABSTRACT NOUN - such as "strategy", "figure", "statistic", "findings", "situation", "change", "difference" etc. - then such an appositive may be allowed to describe the entire situation described in the preceding clause.


Examples:
"... rose sharply in 1990, twice as many as ... " -- WRONG!!
"... rose sharply in 1990, doubling the increase of the previous year." -- RIGHT!!
can you please elaborate it.

_________________
I'm no expert, just trying to work on my skills. If I've made any mistakes please bear with me.

tisrar02 Master | Next Rank: 500 Posts
Joined
20 Apr 2012
Posted:
130 messages
Followed by:
4 members
Thanked:
16 times
Target GMAT Score:
650+
GMAT Score:
650
Post Tue Feb 05, 2013 5:04 pm
The correct answer is 2). You have two time frames. The earthquake and the construction of these buildings. You need "had been" to make the sentence clear and concise as to which event happened first and which event happened later.

Option 5) distorts the meaning a bit which is why 2) is the correct answer.

destiny0411 wrote:
Some of the buildings that were destroyed and heavily damaged in the earthquake last year were constructed in viloatio of the city's building code.

1)Some buildings that were destroyed and heavily damaged in the earthquake last year were
2)Some buildings that were destroyed and heavily damaged in the earthquake last year had been
3)Some buildings that were destroyed and heavily damaged in the earthquake last year have been
4)Last year the earthquake destroyed and heavily damaged last year have been
5)Last year some the buildings that were destroyed or heavily damaged in the earthquake had been


Need the correct answer guys.

_________________
Dedication is what leads to success...

Best Conversation Starters

1 LUANDATO 153 topics
2 lheiannie07 87 topics
3 Roland2rule 75 topics
4 AAPL 62 topics
5 ardz24 60 topics
See More Top Beat The GMAT Members...

Most Active Experts

1 image description EconomistGMATTutor

The Economist GMAT Tutor

166 posts
2 image description GMATGuruNY

The Princeton Review Teacher

130 posts
3 image description Jay@ManhattanReview

Manhattan Review

128 posts
4 image description Rich.C@EMPOWERgma...

EMPOWERgmat

121 posts
5 image description Brent@GMATPrepNow

GMAT Prep Now Teacher

99 posts
See More Top Beat The GMAT Experts