• Economist Test Prep
    Free Trial & Practice Exam
    BEAT THE GMAT EXCLUSIVE

    Available with Beat the GMAT members only code

    MORE DETAILS
    Economist Test Prep
  • Kaplan Test Prep
    Free Practice Test & Review
    How would you score if you took the GMAT

    Available with Beat the GMAT members only code

    MORE DETAILS
    Kaplan Test Prep
  • Target Test Prep
    5-Day Free Trial
    5-day free, full-access trial TTP Quant

    Available with Beat the GMAT members only code

    MORE DETAILS
    Target Test Prep
  • Magoosh
    Magoosh
    Study with Magoosh GMAT prep

    Available with Beat the GMAT members only code

    MORE DETAILS
    Magoosh
  • PrepScholar GMAT
    5 Day FREE Trial
    Study Smarter, Not Harder

    Available with Beat the GMAT members only code

    MORE DETAILS
    PrepScholar GMAT
  • EMPOWERgmat Slider
    1 Hour Free
    BEAT THE GMAT EXCLUSIVE

    Available with Beat the GMAT members only code

    MORE DETAILS
    EMPOWERgmat Slider
  • Varsity Tutors
    Award-winning private GMAT tutoring
    Register now and save up to $200

    Available with Beat the GMAT members only code

    MORE DETAILS
    Varsity Tutors
  • e-gmat Exclusive Offer
    Get 300+ Practice Questions
    25 Video lessons and 6 Webinars for FREE

    Available with Beat the GMAT members only code

    MORE DETAILS
    e-gmat Exclusive Offer
  • Veritas Prep
    Free Veritas GMAT Class
    Experience Lesson 1 Live Free

    Available with Beat the GMAT members only code

    MORE DETAILS
    Veritas Prep

Never give up. A story of perseverance.

This topic has 1 expert reply and 4 member replies
Rastis Master | Next Rank: 500 Posts
Joined
21 Sep 2011
Posted:
183 messages
Followed by:
2 members
Thanked:
6 times
Target GMAT Score:
700
GMAT Score:
500

Never give up. A story of perseverance.

Post Thu Feb 18, 2016 10:08 am
Bear with me, please. This is rather long but worth the read.

Ever since happening upon this website six or so years ago I always imagined the day when I would be able to write my own success story of getting into business school. And up until this past Tuesday, I didn't think I ever was.

My story begins when I lived in DC not too long ago. I had moved to DC in June 2007 to begin working for the government with the idea of gaining quality work experience to use to eventually apply to business school; my undergraduate GPA was poor and I knew I needed such experience to help overshadow it. When I decided that it was time to start looking at the GMAT (probably the winter of 2009) I signed up with the only prep company I'd heard of at the time, Princeton Review. I was EXTREMELY ignorant and naive about the entire business school process, including the GMAT and the required preparation.

Like most if not all courses, the instructor was someone who had scored in the 99% percentile, but this instructor seemed to be as old if not younger than I (27 at the time) and I could tell had no experience or business for that matter teaching a course. From the onset I had no clue what was going on, specifically when it came to the quant part of it all. It seemed like I had forgotten how to do math, and this coming from an economics major. I requested several private tutoring sessions with him at the cost of $150 and hour (huge rip off, btw), which was on top of the $1200 I had already paid for the course.

Not knowing anything about researching schools' class averages in terms of scores I went ahead and took the official test and scored a whopping 330. I went ahead an applied to McCombs School of Business and of course was denied and essentially wasted $200 on the application fee. Of course I was discouraged and down. It wasn't until I started reading posts on Beat the GMAT about applying that I realized I had absolutely no reason to feel sorry for myself. McCombs' class average at that time for their full time program was 690! I had no business applying. So I hit the reset button and started over.

I decided to give Veritas Prep a try after reading testimonials on both BTG and also their website and talking on the phone to one of its representatives. I dropped another $1200 on yet another classroom course. There wasn't much difference this time around in terms of my ability to excel even the slightest on the quantitative section. Fortunately, the instructor could see how much I was struggling and was nice enough to stay longer after class and work with me one-on-one at no charge. I remember asking him, "Have you ever worked with someone with this poor of math skills?" His response was a quick "Nope". He went a step further and researched remedial math books online for me to purchase, which I did without hesitation. I found myself essentially relearning algebra and other math concepts that date back to 8th grade math. Talk about a falling from grace. I never really ever improved after that. I attended online tutorials that were held at certain times and I always submitted questions that I had to their test-help people but nothing ever worked. Ever.

I reached out several different times to their HQ expressing my concerns. They convinced me to try one of their online courses. Once again, I was at the bottom of the class in terms of understanding what in the hell was going on. I think I worked with Veritas Prep for the better part of two or three years, taking ANOTHER online course on top of the online course I had already taken and the classroom course. I decided to take the exam I think two different times during that stretch and never scored above a 490.

I remember so, so many tears being shed for so many reasons. I remember holding back tears while I was working with the Veritas Prep instructor after class. I remember tearing up when we would finish for the night and I would head to my truck, just thinking of "How is it that I cannot understand this and everyone else gets it so easily?" I remember tearing up after ever piss poor showing on a practice test. I even remember tearing up after words of encouragement from fellow GMAT takers were sent my way, whether it was a comment to one of my rants on a BTG forum (which there were plenty of [rants]) or during an online tutoring session. Pretty pathetic for a grown man who, by this time, was in his 30s.

It wasn't until a guy by the name of Rich reached out to me after reading my rants on BTG. We exchanged several emails and he convinced me that I needed to learn the GMAT in a completely different way. That at this point I was going to have to accept that I could not learn anymore with the current way I was being taught. He pointed me to the company that he co-founded, EmpowerGMAT.

If you're not aware of this course, you should be. The way the course is designed is that Rich and Max, the other co-founder, teach you tactics for both quant and verbal through modules that are interactive. Both Rich and Max show you on the screen how to do problems with step-by-step processes. I learned more in the first few modules of the quant and verbal sections that I had EVER learned from the previous courses I took. I mean, it wasn't even close. I saw my practice test scores jump immediately. While my scores weren't stellar and barely cracked 600, they were a huge leap from the 500s I had been scoring. As I continued the course, I found my GMAT practice scores were always over 600, with one score being a 680! So, I signed up for the exam again and took it - 500. How could this be? I was doing so well in practice! How did I have this fall? I reached out to Rich who gave me encouragement and guidance and pushed me to reapply myself.

This vicious circle happened several more times - score high on practice tests, bomb official tests. At this point I had over 7 years of work experience and was getting up to an age where being in a full time program wasn't a possibility so I applied to a full time program at a school in Texas (we'll call it XYZ, you'll see why here in a bit) with my 500 GMAT score. After reading so many testimonials and attending NUMEROUS MBA conferences in DC (I was still living there; I chose Texas schools because I'm a Texan and wanted to get back) I knew that reaching out to admissions folks at schools was just as an important part to applying to school as was scoring a high GMAT. I had flown down to Texas to do class visits at McCombs, Rice and XYZ - all within a week's time. I created very good and professional relationships with the admissions folks of these schools, especially at XYZ. I told the Director of Admissions (DOA) that I was going to take the GMAT and then submit my application in time for the second round. And that was when I scored a 500 and was of course worried. I expressed my concerns with the DOA who suggested that I go ahead an apply (providing that the rest of my application was stellar, which is was. I had even taken and received an A in a microeconomics course at a local school in DC that I used as part of my application in order to overshadow my GPA), adding that the best case scenario would probably be being waitlisted.

Not too long after I submitted my application I received an email from XYZ indicating that they wanted to set up an interview via Skype. I was so excited! It was my first admissions interview ever! I felt like I gave a pretty good interview considering it was my first time but I ended up being waitlisted. I couldn't have been happier about the decision. I knew, after doing my research on BTG about being a wailisted candidated, that I was a fit for XYZ's program. I just needed a boost. So, as a waitlist candidate, I was given three tasks to do in order to get a second evaluation of my application: submit a letter of interest, provide an updated resume that included a promotion and submit improved GMAT scores. It had so happened that I was up for a promotion during that time so I had the resume part covered. I worked with an admissions coach to craft an amazing letter of interest so that was done. All that was left was retaking the GMAT. I received the waitlisted news in late February so I scheduled the GMAT for the end of May of that year, which at this point was last year, 2015. I studied up until that point, taking practice tests along the way, with my highest score being a 620 during that stretch. XYZ's class average was I believe around 640 or less so I knew I was within reach. With test day coming up in a few days, I heeded the advice of a GMAT expert on BTG to do some mediation before test day, which I did. I showed up to the testing center so nervous that I had to stop at the bathroom before showing up to the suite to vomit. After that episode, I was good to go. I showed up in the testing center, looking and feeling confident. I had my body language in a commanding position (as suggested in Amy Cuddy's TED Talks. If you haven't watched her speech, DO IT) and I was ready to dominate. I took the test, feeling rather discouraged immediately afterwards as I felt as I choked on the quant. Then the scores popped up - 590. After taking the GMAT for this the SEVENTH TIME I scored a 590, which was my highest score to date. While the overall score wasn't impressive to say the least, what was impressive was my quant score - 44. I was extremely happy with that. For some reason I sucked it up on the verbal section scoring I think a 28; most of my verbal scores on practice tests were in the low-to-mid 30s. Immediately after taking the test I emailed the DOA of XYZ to notify them of my scores. The DOA requested that I email them a copy of the unofficial scores so they could take them immediately to the admissions committee.

So maybe a couple weeks went by and I received an email from school XYZ notifying me of their admissions decision - Denied. I was so incredibly crushed and discouraged. But my sadness immediately turned to rage and anger once I let things sink in. Rather than the DOA calling me on the phone to tell me that I was denied, I was emailed a chickenshit standard "denial" template from the school with the DOA's email signature at the bottom. To be denied admission after all the work I had done to show the DOA and admissions committee how committed I was to XYZ was one thing, not having the professionalism or the spine to call me to let me know is something else. After that, I stopped taking the GMAT and decided just to apply to schools with my 590 GMAT since it gave me a chance to be interviewed.

During the calendar year of 2015, I applied to and interviewed for five different programs (three of which were for part time MBA and one for executive MBA) from three different Texas schools, all getting denied, whether for my GMAT score or being told that the program was not a "good fit" for me and my post-MBA goals. At this point, you could understand that I was feeling that my dream of getting an MBA was done with. It had been several years of trying and trying and taking the GMAT seven times and being denied by seemingly every program in the state of Texas for one reason or another. But then I decided to take a look at one last school, which I never had given much thought. You see, I was applying to schools that had an energy specialization and with this school, I was told that they didn't have a specialization in energy, only certificates in energy. But after coming back to this school and reaching out to the school's ambassadors and meeting with admissions persons, it was revealed that their energy certificates were their way of saying specializations! So, without hesitation I got my application together and submitted everything. I was given the chance to interview on campus (by this time I had moved back to Texas) this past Friday. I gave an amazing interview and was told afterwards that I'd receive a decision "very soon, within 10 days". Well that decision came this past Tuesday and wouldn't you know it, I WAS ACCEPTED!!!!!!!!!!

Finally!! Finally after all the years of hard work I put forth, all the tears that I shed, all the times that I felt like giving up and accepting that an MBA just wasn't for me, a school finally gave me a chance. A school finally looked past test scores and measured the individual based on the person who he is and not some test. I start this August and intend to do two things: 1) absolutely dominate and leave a positive mark on the program and enter a successful career in energy and eventually make a huge positive impact and 2) show the others schools, specifically XYZ, what they passed up. Nothing would make me happier than to compete in competitions against these schools and come out on top ever time. I guess you could say that I will have a huge chip on my shoulder during my time in school.

In conclusion, there are a few things I'd like to say. First, do not let ANY of these admissions people tell you that their review process of an application is "holistic" and that every part is measured equally. Don't let them tell you that they "don't have a minimum GMAT requirement". All of that is b.s. Nothing more, nothing less. Business schools (and I've been told this by former admissions committee members) require a certain score in order to cull applications. And that makes sense when you're receiving thousands of applications. You can't expect every single one to be read. Regardless, do not apply to the school of your dreams thinking that a score 100 or so points less than their average is good enough, because it's not. Trust me, I know. If you want a real shot of getting accepted you better shoot for at least their class' average.

Second, if a school doesn't show you any respect during the application process, like the lack of respect I was shown by XYZ, then that school is not worthy. Do not give them your commitment as they are not giving you theirs.

Third, do your due diligence when applying. Seek the help of anyone and everyone when it comes to GMAT prep. Take advantage of EmpowerGMAT and the guidance of Rich and Max. DO NOT waste money on a $1000+ test prep company. I must've spent $3,000 on them alone. My admissions victory is as much Rich and Max's as it is mine. Network, network, network with current students, alumni and admissions staff of the school you want to apply to. Show them regularly of your progress and how committed you are. Do the class visits. Go to their table at MBA events. Have those coffee chats with alums that are in your area. Do it all! I'm telling you, this is such an important part of the application process. I cannot stress this enough.

Fourth and finally, don't ever give up. Never let others deter you from your dreams. I'm living proof that with hard work, determination and perseverance that you can achieve your goals. I had people who thought that "the guy with the Texas drawl" wasn't smart enough to get into business school, let alone succeed in it. Never let people tell you what your dreams should or shouldn't be. If you want it bad enough, you can do it. I can now finally toss all my GMAT books and never worry about that test again and instead look forward to the next challenge of my MBA journey and ultimately my career and future.

I have fulfilled my dreams of getting accepted to business school. Are you ready to fulfill yours?


Sincerely,

Jesse, Class of 2018.

Need free GMAT or MBA advice from an expert? Register for Beat The GMAT now and post your question in these forums!
kashc2 Newbie | Next Rank: 10 Posts Default Avatar
Joined
28 Feb 2016
Posted:
7 messages
Thanked:
1 times
Post Fri Apr 08, 2016 7:17 pm
Thanks for sharing, Jesse! Appreciate the tips you provide, will definitely follow them when it comes time to start applying to b-schools. I'm so glad you were able to see your dreams come true!

jlpg91 Newbie | Next Rank: 10 Posts Default Avatar
Joined
17 Sep 2015
Posted:
1 messages
Post Tue Apr 26, 2016 5:27 pm
Great!! congrats !!!

cburton815 Newbie | Next Rank: 10 Posts Default Avatar
Joined
01 Jun 2016
Posted:
3 messages
Post Wed Jun 01, 2016 7:32 pm
Wow--congrats! This is such an inspiring story.

selva.masters Newbie | Next Rank: 10 Posts Default Avatar
Joined
19 Jun 2016
Posted:
1 messages
Target GMAT Score:
700
Post Sun Jun 19, 2016 9:29 am
Congrats!! Wish you all the best and only success in your career Smile

_________________
Stay grounded, stay blessed! Smile

GMAT/MBA Expert

Post Fri Sep 30, 2016 7:40 am
Rastis wrote:
Bear with me, please. This is rather long but worth the read.

Ever since happening upon this website six or so years ago I always imagined the day when I would be able to write my own success story of getting into business school. And up until this past Tuesday, I didn't think I ever was.

My story begins when I lived in DC not too long ago. I had moved to DC in June 2007 to begin working for the government with the idea of gaining quality work experience to use to eventually apply to business school; my undergraduate GPA was poor and I knew I needed such experience to help overshadow it. When I decided that it was time to start looking at the GMAT (probably the winter of 2009) I signed up with the only prep company I'd heard of at the time, Princeton Review. I was EXTREMELY ignorant and naive about the entire business school process, including the GMAT and the required preparation.

Like most if not all courses, the instructor was someone who had scored in the 99% percentile, but this instructor seemed to be as old if not younger than I (27 at the time) and I could tell had no experience or business for that matter teaching a course. From the onset I had no clue what was going on, specifically when it came to the quant part of it all. It seemed like I had forgotten how to do math, and this coming from an economics major. I requested several private tutoring sessions with him at the cost of $150 and hour (huge rip off, btw), which was on top of the $1200 I had already paid for the course.

Not knowing anything about researching schools' class averages in terms of scores I went ahead and took the official test and scored a whopping 330. I went ahead an applied to McCombs School of Business and of course was denied and essentially wasted $200 on the application fee. Of course I was discouraged and down. It wasn't until I started reading posts on Beat the GMAT about applying that I realized I had absolutely no reason to feel sorry for myself. McCombs' class average at that time for their full time program was 690! I had no business applying. So I hit the reset button and started over.

I decided to give Veritas Prep a try after reading testimonials on both BTG and also their website and talking on the phone to one of its representatives. I dropped another $1200 on yet another classroom course. There wasn't much difference this time around in terms of my ability to excel even the slightest on the quantitative section. Fortunately, the instructor could see how much I was struggling and was nice enough to stay longer after class and work with me one-on-one at no charge. I remember asking him, "Have you ever worked with someone with this poor of math skills?" His response was a quick "Nope". He went a step further and researched remedial math books online for me to purchase, which I did without hesitation. I found myself essentially relearning algebra and other math concepts that date back to 8th grade math. Talk about a falling from grace. I never really ever improved after that. I attended online tutorials that were held at certain times and I always submitted questions that I had to their test-help people but nothing ever worked. Ever.

I reached out several different times to their HQ expressing my concerns. They convinced me to try one of their online courses. Once again, I was at the bottom of the class in terms of understanding what in the hell was going on. I think I worked with Veritas Prep for the better part of two or three years, taking ANOTHER online course on top of the online course I had already taken and the classroom course. I decided to take the exam I think two different times during that stretch and never scored above a 490.

I remember so, so many tears being shed for so many reasons. I remember holding back tears while I was working with the Veritas Prep instructor after class. I remember tearing up when we would finish for the night and I would head to my truck, just thinking of "How is it that I cannot understand this and everyone else gets it so easily?" I remember tearing up after ever piss poor showing on a practice test. I even remember tearing up after words of encouragement from fellow GMAT takers were sent my way, whether it was a comment to one of my rants on a BTG forum (which there were plenty of [rants]) or during an online tutoring session. Pretty pathetic for a grown man who, by this time, was in his 30s.

It wasn't until a guy by the name of Rich reached out to me after reading my rants on BTG. We exchanged several emails and he convinced me that I needed to learn the GMAT in a completely different way. That at this point I was going to have to accept that I could not learn anymore with the current way I was being taught. He pointed me to the company that he co-founded, EmpowerGMAT.

If you're not aware of this course, you should be. The way the course is designed is that Rich and Max, the other co-founder, teach you tactics for both quant and verbal through modules that are interactive. Both Rich and Max show you on the screen how to do problems with step-by-step processes. I learned more in the first few modules of the quant and verbal sections that I had EVER learned from the previous courses I took. I mean, it wasn't even close. I saw my practice test scores jump immediately. While my scores weren't stellar and barely cracked 600, they were a huge leap from the 500s I had been scoring. As I continued the course, I found my GMAT practice scores were always over 600, with one score being a 680! So, I signed up for the exam again and took it - 500. How could this be? I was doing so well in practice! How did I have this fall? I reached out to Rich who gave me encouragement and guidance and pushed me to reapply myself.

This vicious circle happened several more times - score high on practice tests, bomb official tests. At this point I had over 7 years of work experience and was getting up to an age where being in a full time program wasn't a possibility so I applied to a full time program at a school in Texas (we'll call it XYZ, you'll see why here in a bit) with my 500 GMAT score. After reading so many testimonials and attending NUMEROUS MBA conferences in DC (I was still living there; I chose Texas schools because I'm a Texan and wanted to get back) I knew that reaching out to admissions folks at schools was just as an important part to applying to school as was scoring a high GMAT. I had flown down to Texas to do class visits at McCombs, Rice and XYZ - all within a week's time. I created very good and professional relationships with the admissions folks of these schools, especially at XYZ. I told the Director of Admissions (DOA) that I was going to take the GMAT and then submit my application in time for the second round. And that was when I scored a 500 and was of course worried. I expressed my concerns with the DOA who suggested that I go ahead an apply (providing that the rest of my application was stellar, which is was. I had even taken and received an A in a microeconomics course at a local school in DC that I used as part of my application in order to overshadow my GPA), adding that the best case scenario would probably be being waitlisted.

Not too long after I submitted my application I received an email from XYZ indicating that they wanted to set up an interview via Skype. I was so excited! It was my first admissions interview ever! I felt like I gave a pretty good interview considering it was my first time but I ended up being waitlisted. I couldn't have been happier about the decision. I knew, after doing my research on BTG about being a wailisted candidated, that I was a fit for XYZ's program. I just needed a boost. So, as a waitlist candidate, I was given three tasks to do in order to get a second evaluation of my application: submit a letter of interest, provide an updated resume that included a promotion and submit improved GMAT scores. It had so happened that I was up for a promotion during that time so I had the resume part covered. I worked with an admissions coach to craft an amazing letter of interest so that was done. All that was left was retaking the GMAT. I received the waitlisted news in late February so I scheduled the GMAT for the end of May of that year, which at this point was last year, 2015. I studied up until that point, taking practice tests along the way, with my highest score being a 620 during that stretch. XYZ's class average was I believe around 640 or less so I knew I was within reach. With test day coming up in a few days, I heeded the advice of a GMAT expert on BTG to do some mediation before test day, which I did. I showed up to the testing center so nervous that I had to stop at the bathroom before showing up to the suite to vomit. After that episode, I was good to go. I showed up in the testing center, looking and feeling confident. I had my body language in a commanding position (as suggested in Amy Cuddy's TED Talks. If you haven't watched her speech, DO IT) and I was ready to dominate. I took the test, feeling rather discouraged immediately afterwards as I felt as I choked on the quant. Then the scores popped up - 590. After taking the GMAT for this the SEVENTH TIME I scored a 590, which was my highest score to date. While the overall score wasn't impressive to say the least, what was impressive was my quant score - 44. I was extremely happy with that. For some reason I sucked it up on the verbal section scoring I think a 28; most of my verbal scores on practice tests were in the low-to-mid 30s. Immediately after taking the test I emailed the DOA of XYZ to notify them of my scores. The DOA requested that I email them a copy of the unofficial scores so they could take them immediately to the admissions committee.

So maybe a couple weeks went by and I received an email from school XYZ notifying me of their admissions decision - Denied. I was so incredibly crushed and discouraged. But my sadness immediately turned to rage and anger once I let things sink in. Rather than the DOA calling me on the phone to tell me that I was denied, I was emailed a chickenshit standard "denial" template from the school with the DOA's email signature at the bottom. To be denied admission after all the work I had done to show the DOA and admissions committee how committed I was to XYZ was one thing, not having the professionalism or the spine to call me to let me know is something else. After that, I stopped taking the GMAT and decided just to apply to schools with my 590 GMAT since it gave me a chance to be interviewed.

During the calendar year of 2015, I applied to and interviewed for five different programs (three of which were for part time MBA and one for executive MBA) from three different Texas schools, all getting denied, whether for my GMAT score or being told that the program was not a "good fit" for me and my post-MBA goals. At this point, you could understand that I was feeling that my dream of getting an MBA was done with. It had been several years of trying and trying and taking the GMAT seven times and being denied by seemingly every program in the state of Texas for one reason or another. But then I decided to take a look at one last school, which I never had given much thought. You see, I was applying to schools that had an energy specialization and with this school, I was told that they didn't have a specialization in energy, only certificates in energy. But after coming back to this school and reaching out to the school's ambassadors and meeting with admissions persons, it was revealed that their energy certificates were their way of saying specializations! So, without hesitation I got my application together and submitted everything. I was given the chance to interview on campus (by this time I had moved back to Texas) this past Friday. I gave an amazing interview and was told afterwards that I'd receive a decision "very soon, within 10 days". Well that decision came this past Tuesday and wouldn't you know it, I WAS ACCEPTED!!!!!!!!!!

Finally!! Finally after all the years of hard work I put forth, all the tears that I shed, all the times that I felt like giving up and accepting that an MBA just wasn't for me, a school finally gave me a chance. A school finally looked past test scores and measured the individual based on the person who he is and not some test. I start this August and intend to do two things: 1) absolutely dominate and leave a positive mark on the program and enter a successful career in energy and eventually make a huge positive impact and 2) show the others schools, specifically XYZ, what they passed up. Nothing would make me happier than to compete in competitions against these schools and come out on top ever time. I guess you could say that I will have a huge chip on my shoulder during my time in school.

In conclusion, there are a few things I'd like to say. First, do not let ANY of these admissions people tell you that their review process of an application is "holistic" and that every part is measured equally. Don't let them tell you that they "don't have a minimum GMAT requirement". All of that is b.s. Nothing more, nothing less. Business schools (and I've been told this by former admissions committee members) require a certain score in order to cull applications. And that makes sense when you're receiving thousands of applications. You can't expect every single one to be read. Regardless, do not apply to the school of your dreams thinking that a score 100 or so points less than their average is good enough, because it's not. Trust me, I know. If you want a real shot of getting accepted you better shoot for at least their class' average.

Second, if a school doesn't show you any respect during the application process, like the lack of respect I was shown by XYZ, then that school is not worthy. Do not give them your commitment as they are not giving you theirs.

Third, do your due diligence when applying. Seek the help of anyone and everyone when it comes to GMAT prep. Take advantage of EmpowerGMAT and the guidance of Rich and Max. DO NOT waste money on a $1000+ test prep company. I must've spent $3,000 on them alone. My admissions victory is as much Rich and Max's as it is mine. Network, network, network with current students, alumni and admissions staff of the school you want to apply to. Show them regularly of your progress and how committed you are. Do the class visits. Go to their table at MBA events. Have those coffee chats with alums that are in your area. Do it all! I'm telling you, this is such an important part of the application process. I cannot stress this enough.

Fourth and finally, don't ever give up. Never let others deter you from your dreams. I'm living proof that with hard work, determination and perseverance that you can achieve your goals. I had people who thought that "the guy with the Texas drawl" wasn't smart enough to get into business school, let alone succeed in it. Never let people tell you what your dreams should or shouldn't be. If you want it bad enough, you can do it. I can now finally toss all my GMAT books and never worry about that test again and instead look forward to the next challenge of my MBA journey and ultimately my career and future.

I have fulfilled my dreams of getting accepted to business school. Are you ready to fulfill yours?


Sincerely,

Jesse, Class of 2018.
Congratulations! What a journey! But what matters most is having a career of impact and I hope you do! Best wishes and thanks for sharing your journey.

Best Conversation Starters

1 LUANDATO 153 topics
2 lheiannie07 87 topics
3 Roland2rule 75 topics
4 AAPL 62 topics
5 ardz24 60 topics
See More Top Beat The GMAT Members...

Most Active Experts

1 image description EconomistGMATTutor

The Economist GMAT Tutor

166 posts
2 image description GMATGuruNY

The Princeton Review Teacher

130 posts
3 image description Jay@ManhattanReview

Manhattan Review

128 posts
4 image description Rich.C@EMPOWERgma...

EMPOWERgmat

121 posts
5 image description Brent@GMATPrepNow

GMAT Prep Now Teacher

99 posts
See More Top Beat The GMAT Experts