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Many languages in the world...

This topic has 11 member replies
g_beatthegmat Master | Next Rank: 500 Posts Default Avatar
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Many languages in the world...

Post Mon Jun 16, 2008 3:46 am
Elapsed Time: 00:00
  • Lap #[LAPCOUNT] ([LAPTIME])
    Nobody knows exactly how many languages there are in the world, partly because of the difficulty of distinguishing between a language and the sub-languages or dialects within it, but those who have tried to count typically have found about five thousand.

    A) and the sub-languages or dialects within it, but those who have tried to count typically have found

    B) and the sub-languages or dialects within them, with those who have tried counting typically finding

    C) and the sub-languages or dialects within it, but those who have tried counting it typically find

    D) or the sub-languages or dialects within them, but those who tried to count them typically found

    E) or the sub-languages or dialects within them, with those who have tried to count typically finding

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    sulabh Master | Next Rank: 500 Posts Default Avatar
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    Post Mon Jun 16, 2008 4:08 am
    answer is A.
    'Between' in the sentence requires 'and' so only A,B & C are left.

    Nobody knows exactly how many languages there are in the world, partly because of the difficulty of distinguishing between a language and the sub-languages or dialects within it, but those who have tried to count typically have found about five thousand.
    A) and the sub-languages or dialects within it, but those who have tried to count typically have found (CORRECT)

    B) and the sub-languages or dialects within them, with those who have tried counting typically finding (refers to language so should be 'it')

    C) and the sub-languages or dialects within it, but those who have tried counting it typically find (should be 'them' as it refers to 'how many languages')


    CHEERS!

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    g_beatthegmat Master | Next Rank: 500 Posts Default Avatar
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    Post Mon Jun 16, 2008 4:19 am
    thanks sulabh!

    So if (c) had "them" instead of "it"
    and the sub-languages or dialects within it, but those who have tried counting them typically find

    then would this have been preferred over (a)?

    sulabh Master | Next Rank: 500 Posts Default Avatar
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    Post Mon Jun 16, 2008 4:28 am
    Nopes even then I would have gone with A.Becuase of 'have found'
    Nobody knows exactly how many languages there are in the world, partly because of the difficulty of distinguishing between a language and the sub-languages or dialects within it, but those who have tried to count typically have found about five thousand.

    g_beatthegmat Master | Next Rank: 500 Posts Default Avatar
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    Post Mon Jun 16, 2008 4:42 am
    Somehow my confusion is around (a)'s "tried to count" and (c)'s "tried counting". I feel the rest of the part is good.

    gmatinjuly Master | Next Rank: 500 Posts Default Avatar
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    Post Mon Jun 16, 2008 4:56 am
    Usage : Between a and b (ekiminate D/E)

    LANGUAGE AND ITS DIALECTSso eliminate B

    Those who have tried counting (it)tried counting languages plural .C is incorrect.

    Have is right usage and so A is corrct

    uptowngirl92 Master | Next Rank: 500 Posts Default Avatar
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    Post Fri Oct 02, 2009 8:52 pm
    g_beatthegmat wrote:
    Nobody knows exactly how many languages there are in the world, partly because of the difficulty of distinguishing between a language and the sub-languages or dialects within it, but those who have tried to count typically have found about five thousand.

    A) and the sub-languages or dialects within it, but those who have tried to count typically have found

    B) and the sub-languages or dialects within them, with those who have tried counting typically finding

    C) and the sub-languages or dialects within it, but those who have tried counting it typically find

    D) or the sub-languages or dialects within them, but those who tried to count them typically found

    E) or the sub-languages or dialects within them, with those who have tried to count typically finding
    Between A,B,C..We need to find out whther singular or plural is reqd..
    My mistake was I considered the language in blue as the subject and it being singular proceeded with the question..but the lanuages in red is the subject Sad I keep missing out on what the subject is..how did u guys identify?

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    Post Sat Jul 24, 2010 6:11 am
    g_beatthegmat wrote:
    thanks sulabh!

    So if (c) had "them" instead of "it"
    and the sub-languages or dialects within it, but those who have tried counting them typically find

    then would this have been preferred over (a)?
    Interesting... well...
    have tried is parallel to have found , so i would still have gone with A.

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    Post Sat Jul 24, 2010 8:30 pm
    sulabh wrote:
    answer is A.
    'Between' in the sentence requires 'and' so only A,B & C are left.

    Nobody knows exactly how many languages there are in the world, partly because of the difficulty of distinguishing between a language and the sub-languages or dialects within it, but those who have tried to count typically have found about five thousand.
    A) and the sub-languages or dialects within it, but those who have tried to count typically have found (CORRECT)

    B) and the sub-languages or dialects within them, with those who have tried counting typically finding (refers to language so should be 'it')

    C) and the sub-languages or dialects within it, but those who have tried counting it typically find (should be 'them' as it refers to 'how many languages')


    CHEERS!
    Still unclear..
    How can we be sure that the "it" is pointing to language.... why cant "them" point to the languages... I was thinking for a while before I thght "them: sounds more appropriate.. although the answer B sounds awkward..

    Anyone who can explain,,,

    If the source is 1000SC then is it possible that all answers are incorrect.. ???

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    BastiG Master | Next Rank: 500 Posts Default Avatar
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    Post Sun Jul 25, 2010 3:34 pm
    Manhattan Gmat Prep Sentence Correction mentions in the idiom list, that the verb (try + -ing) is suspect, but the verb (try + to + infinitiv) is right. So if both A and C seem correct, I always would prefer (have tried to count) over (have tried counting).

    Greetings

    rohu27 Legendary Member Default Avatar
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    Post Thu Apr 07, 2011 1:38 am
    re-opening an old thread.

    I understand how to get to the OA but can someone please explain me the below?
    what does those refer to here? (is it nobody?)

    atulmangal Legendary Member Default Avatar
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    Post Thu Apr 07, 2011 6:37 am
    rohu27 wrote:
    re-opening an old thread.

    I understand how to get to the OA but can someone please explain me the below?
    what does those refer to here? (is it nobody?)
    @ rohu

    Quote:
    Nobody knows exactly how many languages there are in the world, partly because of the difficulty of distinguishing between a language and the sub-languages or dialects within it, but those who have tried to count typically have found about five thousand.
    If u notice the part before COMMA BUT and after COMMA BUT....both are Independent Clauses. or you can say independent statements.

    Sub of first clause is NOBODY..just like...you can't ask who is NOBODY...because its the subject and it simply means "nobody in the world" .....similarly the sub of 2nd IC is THOSE....i don't think that THOSE must refer to something in the previous clause...although we get the description of THOSE from the previous clause, "those in the world" so that both the IC doesn't look like EAST AND WEST...they looks logically connected.

    Thanks

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