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Joseph Glatthaar’s Forged in Battle is

This topic has 1 expert reply and 0 member replies
fiza gupta Master | Next Rank: 500 Posts
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Target GMAT Score:
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Joseph Glatthaar’s Forged in Battle is

Post Fri Dec 09, 2016 12:00 am
Elapsed Time: 00:00
  • Lap #[LAPCOUNT] ([LAPTIME])
    Joseph Glatthaar’s Forged in Battle is not the first excel-
    lent study of Black soldiers and their White officers in the
    Civil War, but it uses more soldiers’ letters and diaries-
    Line including rare material from Black soldiers- and concen-
    (5) trates more intensely on Black-White relations in Black
    regiments than do any of its predecessors. Glatthaar’s title
    expresses his thesis: loyalty, friendship, and respect among
    White officers and Black soldiers were fostered by the
    mutual dangers they faced in combat.
    (10) Glatthaar accurately describes the government's discrim-
    inatory treatment of Black soldiers in pay, promotion, medi-
    cal care, and job assignments, appropriately emphasizing
    the campaign by Black soldiers and their officers to get the
    opportunity to fight. That chance remained limited through-
    (15) out the war by army policies that kept most Black units
    serving in rear-echelon assignments and working in labor
    battalions. Thus, while their combat death rate was only
    one-third that of White units, their mortality rate from
    disease, a major killer in this war, was twice as great.
    (20) Despite these obstacles, the courage and effectiveness of
    several Black units in combat won increasing respect from
    initially skeptical or hostile White soldiers. As one White
    officer put it, “they have fought their way into the respect
    of all the army.”
    (25) In trying to demonstrate the magnitude of this attitude-
    nal change, however, Glatthaar seems to exaggerate the
    prewar racism of the White men who became officers in
    Black regiments. “Prior to the war,” he writes of these
    men, “virtually all of them held powerful racial prejudices.”
    (30) While perhaps true of those officers who joined Black
    units for promotion or other self-serving motives, this state-
    ment misrepresents the attitudes of the many abolitionists
    who became officers in Black regiments. Having spent
    years fighting against the race prejudice endemic in Ameri
    (35) can society, they participated eagerly in this military exper-
    iment, which they hoped would help African Americans
    achieve freedom and postwar civil equality. By current stan-
    dards of racial egalitarianism, these men's paternalism
    toward African Americans was racist. But to call their feel
    (40) ings “powerful racial prejudices” is to indulge in genera-
    tional chauvinism-to judge past eras by present standards.

    The passage mentions which of the following as an important theme that receives special emphasis in Glatthaar's book?
    (A) The attitudes of abolitionist officers in Black units
    (B) The struggle of Black units to get combat assignments
    (C) The consequences of the poor medical care received by Black soldiers
    (D) The motives of officers serving in Black units
    (E) The discrimination that Black soldiers faced when trying for promotions

    OA:B

    _________________
    Fiza Gupta

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    Post Sat Jan 14, 2017 10:59 am
    fiza gupta wrote:
    Joseph Glatthaar’s Forged in Battle is not the first excel-
    lent study of Black soldiers and their White officers in the
    Civil War, but it uses more soldiers’ letters and diaries-
    Line including rare material from Black soldiers- and concen-
    (5) trates more intensely on Black-White relations in Black
    regiments than do any of its predecessors. Glatthaar’s title
    expresses his thesis: loyalty, friendship, and respect among
    White officers and Black soldiers were fostered by the
    mutual dangers they faced in combat.
    (10) Glatthaar accurately describes the government's discrim-
    inatory treatment of Black soldiers in pay, promotion, medi-
    cal care, and job assignments, appropriately emphasizing
    the campaign by Black soldiers and their officers to get the
    opportunity to fight. That chance remained limited through-
    (15) out the war by army policies that kept most Black units
    serving in rear-echelon assignments and working in labor
    battalions. Thus, while their combat death rate was only
    one-third that of White units, their mortality rate from
    disease, a major killer in this war, was twice as great.
    (20) Despite these obstacles, the courage and effectiveness of
    several Black units in combat won increasing respect from
    initially skeptical or hostile White soldiers. As one White
    officer put it, “they have fought their way into the respect
    of all the army.”
    (25) In trying to demonstrate the magnitude of this attitude-
    nal change, however, Glatthaar seems to exaggerate the
    prewar racism of the White men who became officers in
    Black regiments. “Prior to the war,” he writes of these
    men, “virtually all of them held powerful racial prejudices.”
    (30) While perhaps true of those officers who joined Black
    units for promotion or other self-serving motives, this state-
    ment misrepresents the attitudes of the many abolitionists
    who became officers in Black regiments. Having spent
    years fighting against the race prejudice endemic in Ameri
    (35) can society, they participated eagerly in this military exper-
    iment, which they hoped would help African Americans
    achieve freedom and postwar civil equality. By current stan-
    dards of racial egalitarianism, these men's paternalism
    toward African Americans was racist. But to call their feel
    (40) ings “powerful racial prejudices” is to indulge in genera-
    tional chauvinism-to judge past eras by present standards.

    The passage mentions which of the following as an important theme that receives special emphasis in Glatthaar's book?
    (A) The attitudes of abolitionist officers in Black units
    (B) The struggle of Black units to get combat assignments
    (C) The consequences of the poor medical care received by Black soldiers
    (D) The motives of officers serving in Black units
    (E) The discrimination that Black soldiers faced when trying for promotions

    OA:B
    The key line: appropriately emphasizing the campaign by Black soldiers and their officers to get the opportunity to fight. The answer is B

    _________________
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