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how to deal with situational questions?

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dextar Master | Next Rank: 500 Posts Default Avatar
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how to deal with situational questions?

Post Wed Apr 09, 2008 1:27 am
Elapsed Time: 00:00
  • Lap #[LAPCOUNT] ([LAPTIME])
    At the end of the nineteenth century, a rising interest in Native American customs and an increasing desire to understand Native American culture prompted ethnologists to begin recording the life stories of Native American. Ethnologists had a distinct reason for wanting to hear the stories: they were after linguistic or anthropological data that would supplement their own field observations, and they believed that the personal stories, even of a single individual, could increase their understanding of the cultures that they had been observing from without. In addition many ethnologists at the turn of the century believed that Native American manners and customs were rapidly disappearing, and that it was important to preserve for posterity as much information as could be adequately recorded before the cultures disappeared forever.
    There were, however, arguments against this method as a way of acquiring accurate and complete information. Franz Boas, for example, described autobiographies as being "of limited value, and useful chiefly for the study of the perversion of truth by memory," while Paul Radin contended that investigators rarely spent enough time with the tribes they were observing, and inevitably derived results too tinged by the investigator's own emotional tone to be reliable.
    Even more importantly, as these life stories moved from the traditional oral mode to recorded written form, much was inevitably lost. Editors often decided what elements were significant to the field research on a given tribe. Native Americans recognized that the essence of their lives could not be communicated in English and that events that they thought significant were often deemed unimportant by their interviewers. Indeed, the very act of telling their stories could force Native American narrators to distort their cultures, as taboos had to be broken to speak the names of dead relatives crucial to their family stories.
    Despite all of this, autobiography remains a useful tool for ethnological research: such personal reminiscences and impressions, incomplete as they may be, are likely to throw more light on the working of the mind and emotions than any amount of speculation from an ethnologist or ethnological theorist from another culture


    Which of the following is most similar to the actions of nineteenth-century ethnologists in their editing of the life stories of Native Americans?
    (A) A witness in a jury trial invokes the Fifth Amendment in order to avoid relating personally incriminating evidence.
    (B) A stockbroker refuses to divulge the source of her information on the possible future increase in a stock's value.
    (C) A sports announcer describes the action in a team sport with which he is unfamiliar.
    (D) A chef purposely excludes the special ingredient from the recipe of his prizewinning dessert.
    (E) A politician fails to mention in a campaign speech the similarities in the positions held by her opponent for political office and by herself.


    Here how should we proceed. I did it in this way, investigators inevitably derived results too tinged by the investigator's own emotional tone to be reliable. Now how should I proceed from this info? And what does option A imply?

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    jasonc Master | Next Rank: 500 Posts Default Avatar
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    Post Sun Apr 20, 2008 1:12 am
    You should look at more than just 1 part of the passage, heres another important part:
    Quote:
    Editors often decided what elements were significant to the field research on a given tribe. Native Americans recognized that the essence of their lives could not be communicated in English and that events that they thought significant were often deemed unimportant by their interviewers.
    therefore the answer should be C.

    A) implies someone who hides part of the info to protect themself.

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