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How many D

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sanju09 GMAT Instructor
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How many D Post Thu Apr 09, 2009 3:57 am
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  • Lap #[LAPCOUNT] ([LAPTIME])
    L spends total $6.00 for one kind of D and one kind of C. How many D did he buy?

    (1) The price of 2 D was $0.10 less than the price of 3 C.

    (2) The average price of 1 D and 1 C was $0.35.



    OA E

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    kanha81 GMAT Destroyer! Default Avatar
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    Post Thu Apr 09, 2009 8:05 am
    The first time I solved this problem, I got it wrong. Here's how I would attempt to solve.

    Let n: number of D's sold
    m: number of C's sold
    d: price of 1 D
    c: price of 1 C

    First try:
    Given, d + c = 6
    i) 2d = 3c - 0.10

    Here I thought it's solvable because I have 2 equations 2 variables. hence A or D

    ii) Avg. price = (d+c) / 2 = 0.35
    => d + c = 0.70

    Cannot solve because we have 2 equations with same quantities of D and
    C.

    Therefore, [A]

    Second try:
    Given, d + c = 6

    i) 2d = 3c - 0.10
    No information on total number of C's or D's sold. Only information about the price give. Hence B, C, or E

    ii) d + c = 0.70
    No new information besides what's given. Hence C or E

    i) & ii) No information on total number of C's or D's. Nothing new. Hence [E]

    Take-aways: Just by seeing 2 variables and 2 equation don't think that you can find what is asked for in the question. Understand the question FIRST.

    Thanks.

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    vittalgmat GMAT Destroyer! Default Avatar
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    Post Thu Apr 09, 2009 9:24 am
    Hi Sanju,
    This looks like the Donut and cupcake problem?

    Look at the discussion here
    http://www.beatthegmat.com/lew-s-doughnut-prank-t34411.html

    Thanks though for for your effort to create a new problem.

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    sanju09 GMAT Instructor
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    Post Fri Apr 10, 2009 3:36 am
    vittalgmat wrote:
    Hi Sanju,
    This looks like the Donut and cupcake problem?

    Look at the discussion here
    http://www.beatthegmat.com/lew-s-doughnut-prank-t34411.html

    Thanks though for for your effort to create a new problem.
    Not all questions that I post here are my own creations; you can take this question for instance. The plain and simple identity of my own questions is that it won't include the OA along with the post, otherwise is not always true. I pick and post only those questions here that I personally feel must be attempted by its mass for one reason or the other.

    What I shall be doing from next time and onwards, I shall be writing MBM meaning Made By Me beneath all questions that are coming straight from my own kitchen; right vittalgmat!

    _________________
    “The most important thing in business is honesty, integrity, hard work… family… never forgetting where we came from.”

    “The loudest one in the room is the weakest one in the room.”

    ~Frank Lucas

    facebook

    https://www.facebook.com/pages/The-Princeton-Review-Lucknow/153205671537507


    Sanjeev K Saxena
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    The Princeton Review - Manya Abroad
    Lucknow-226001
    Tel: +91-522- 6002178
    Cell:+91-9670999928
    www.manyagroup.com

    Free GMAT Practice Test How can you improve your test score if you don't know your baseline score? Take a free online practice exam. Get started on achieving your dream score today! Sign up now.
    vittalgmat GMAT Destroyer! Default Avatar
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    Post Fri Apr 10, 2009 9:17 am
    No worries my friend!!!.
    I truly appreciate your attempt to create problems. Though D and C were easy to figure out.. I may not figure out others.. Such simple changes can put our thinking hats out of whack. So my request is: Keep it coming!!!.

    I think MBM is a good idea, so that ppl who attempt these problems will know what they are signing up for Smile.

    All in good jest
    -V

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