• EMPOWERgmat Slider
    1 Hour Free
    BEAT THE GMAT EXCLUSIVE

    Available with Beat the GMAT members only code

    MORE DETAILS
    EMPOWERgmat Slider
  • Varsity Tutors
    Award-winning private GMAT tutoring
    Register now and save up to $200

    Available with Beat the GMAT members only code

    MORE DETAILS
    Varsity Tutors
  • Target Test Prep
    5-Day Free Trial
    5-day free, full-access trial TTP Quant

    Available with Beat the GMAT members only code

    MORE DETAILS
    Target Test Prep
  • PrepScholar GMAT
    5 Day FREE Trial
    Study Smarter, Not Harder

    Available with Beat the GMAT members only code

    MORE DETAILS
    PrepScholar GMAT
  • Magoosh
    Magoosh
    Study with Magoosh GMAT prep

    Available with Beat the GMAT members only code

    MORE DETAILS
    Magoosh
  • Kaplan Test Prep
    Free Practice Test & Review
    How would you score if you took the GMAT

    Available with Beat the GMAT members only code

    MORE DETAILS
    Kaplan Test Prep
  • e-gmat Exclusive Offer
    Get 300+ Practice Questions
    25 Video lessons and 6 Webinars for FREE

    Available with Beat the GMAT members only code

    MORE DETAILS
    e-gmat Exclusive Offer
  • Veritas Prep
    Free Veritas GMAT Class
    Experience Lesson 1 Live Free

    Available with Beat the GMAT members only code

    MORE DETAILS
    Veritas Prep
  • Economist Test Prep
    Free Trial & Practice Exam
    BEAT THE GMAT EXCLUSIVE

    Available with Beat the GMAT members only code

    MORE DETAILS
    Economist Test Prep

energetic disassembly

This topic has 8 member replies
maihuna Legendary Member Default Avatar
Joined
28 Dec 2008
Posted:
1578 messages
Followed by:
9 members
Upvotes:
82
GMAT Score:
720

energetic disassembly

Post Sun Aug 23, 2009 1:58 am
Any serious policy discussion about acceptable levels of risk in connection with explosions is not well served if the participants fail to use the word "explosion" and use the phrase "energetic disassembly" instead. In fact, the word "explosion" elicits desirable reactions, such as a heightened level of attention, whereas the substitute phrase does not. Therefore, of the two terms, "explosion" is the one that should be used throughout discussions of this sort.
Which of the following is an assumption on which the argument above depends?
(A) In the kind of discussion at issue, the advantages of desirable reactions to the term "explosion" outweigh the drawbacks, if any, arising from undesirable reactions to that term.
(B) The phrase "energetic disassembly" has not so far been used as a substitute for the word "explosion" in the kind of discussion at issue.
(C) In any serious policy discussion, what is said by the participants is more important than how it is put into words.
(D) The only reason that people would have for using "energetic disassembly" in place of "explosion" is to render impossible any serious policy discussion concerning explosions.
(E) The phrase "energetic disassembly" is not necessarily out of place in describing a controlled rather than an accidental explosion.

_________________
Charged up again to beat the beast Smile

  • +1 Upvote Post
  • Quote
  • Flag
Need free GMAT or MBA advice from an expert? Register for Beat The GMAT now and post your question in these forums!
siddharth rastogi Senior | Next Rank: 100 Posts Default Avatar
Joined
16 Aug 2009
Posted:
66 messages
Upvotes:
2
Post Mon Aug 24, 2009 2:13 am
Any serious policy discussion about acceptable levels of risk in connection with explosions is not well served if the participants fail to use the word "explosion" and use the phrase "energetic disassembly" instead. In fact, the word "explosion" elicits desirable reactions, such as a heightened level of attention, whereas the substitute phrase does not. Therefore, of the two terms, "explosion" is the one that should be used throughout discussions of this sort.
Which of the following is an assumption on which the argument above depends?
(A) In the kind of discussion at issue, the advantages of desirable reactions to the term "explosion" outweigh the drawbacks, if any, arising from undesirable reactions to that term.
(B) The phrase "energetic disassembly" has not so far been used as a substitute for the word "explosion" in the kind of discussion at issue.
(C) In any serious policy discussion, what is said by the participants is more important than how it is put into words.
(D) The only reason that people would have for using "energetic disassembly" in place of "explosion" is to render impossible any serious policy discussion concerning explosions.
(E) The phrase "energetic disassembly" is not necessarily out of place in describing a controlled rather than an accidental explosion.



the answer of above question in my opinion should be A

BECAUSE OTHER OPTIONS DO NOT FILL THE GAP B/W CONC. AND EVIDENCE.

THE CONCLUSION is clearly supported by A, as it states that ALTERNATE DOES NOT EXIST.

  • +1 Upvote Post
  • Quote
  • Flag
srivas Senior | Next Rank: 100 Posts Default Avatar
Joined
26 Dec 2008
Posted:
76 messages
Upvotes:
3
Target GMAT Score:
710
Post Mon Aug 24, 2009 2:59 am
Any serious policy discussion about acceptable levels of risk in connection with explosions is not well served if the participants fail to use the word "explosion" and use the phrase "energetic disassembly" instead. In fact, the word "explosion" elicits desirable reactions, such as a heightened level of attention, whereas the substitute phrase does not. Therefore, of the two terms, "explosion" is the one that should be used throughout discussions of this sort

i feel it is C

_________________
Gmat710,, Hyd

  • +1 Upvote Post
  • Quote
  • Flag
Pdgmat2010 Master | Next Rank: 500 Posts
Joined
21 Feb 2010
Posted:
176 messages
Upvotes:
2
Test Date:
7th Sep
GMAT Score:
710
Post Tue Aug 24, 2010 6:05 am
the OA for this question is A.

if we negate option A
The advantages of desirable reactions to the term 'explosion' do not necessarily outweigh the drawbacks , if any, arising from non desirable reactions to the term. i.e. advantages are few or fewer than the drawbacks so author's point is weakened.

  • +1 Upvote Post
  • Quote
  • Flag
gmatmachoman Legendary Member Default Avatar
Joined
28 Jul 2008
Posted:
2326 messages
Followed by:
2 members
Upvotes:
173
Target GMAT Score:
740
GMAT Score:
710
Post Sun Aug 23, 2009 7:21 am
It shuld be C

Any one for C???

  • +1 Upvote Post
  • Quote
  • Flag
DanaJ Site Admin
Joined
01 Jan 2009
Posted:
2567 messages
Followed by:
550 members
Upvotes:
712
GMAT Score:
770
Post Sun Aug 23, 2009 7:11 am
You're right. The reason I chose this option was because the phrase "whereas the substitute phrase does not" did not stick to my head. For me, the best "correct" option for this question would have been "Energetic dissasembly" does not elicit the same amount of interest as "explosion" and I suppose B was the better rephrasing. After reading the argument again, I realized I totally forgot about that phrase.

  • +1 Upvote Post
  • Quote
  • Flag
maihuna Legendary Member Default Avatar
Joined
28 Dec 2008
Posted:
1578 messages
Followed by:
9 members
Upvotes:
82
GMAT Score:
720
Post Sun Aug 23, 2009 5:36 am
DanaJ wrote:
My pick is B, since it suggest that the phrase "energetic disassembly" will not elicit as much interest as the term "explosion", which is actually the only problem the author has with the whole replacing thing.
DanaJ,
I think B can not be an assumption for the argument. The argument persuade one not to use "energetic disassembly" and instead use "explosion". So whether the term "energetic disassembly" has been previously used it doesn't affect the argument.

Instead since the whole issue is about alertness related with a given preference, there is not much benifits if its negative outweight the corresponding positive, so that can be a valid assumption

_________________
Charged up again to beat the beast Smile

  • +1 Upvote Post
  • Quote
  • Flag
vikram_k51 Master | Next Rank: 500 Posts Default Avatar
Joined
31 Jan 2009
Posted:
208 messages
Upvotes:
2
Post Sun Aug 23, 2009 3:56 am
I think it will be A.

  • +1 Upvote Post
  • Quote
  • Flag
DanaJ Site Admin
Joined
01 Jan 2009
Posted:
2567 messages
Followed by:
550 members
Upvotes:
712
GMAT Score:
770
Post Sun Aug 23, 2009 3:48 am
My pick is B, since it suggest that the phrase "energetic disassembly" will not elicit as much interest as the term "explosion", which is actually the only problem the author has with the whole replacing thing.

  • +1 Upvote Post
  • Quote
  • Flag

Best Conversation Starters

1 Roland2rule 165 topics
2 lheiannie07 110 topics
3 ardz24 60 topics
4 Vincen 50 topics
5 LUANDATO 49 topics
See More Top Beat The GMAT Members...

Most Active Experts

1 image description Brent@GMATPrepNow

GMAT Prep Now Teacher

150 posts
2 image description GMATGuruNY

The Princeton Review Teacher

125 posts
3 image description Jeff@TargetTestPrep

Target Test Prep

120 posts
4 image description Rich.C@EMPOWERgma...

EMPOWERgmat

116 posts
5 image description Scott@TargetTestPrep

Target Test Prep

100 posts
See More Top Beat The GMAT Experts