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Electricity

This topic has 3 expert replies and 9 member replies
aroon7 Master | Next Rank: 500 Posts Default Avatar
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Electricity

Post Wed Jan 28, 2009 9:03 pm
Elapsed Time: 00:00
  • Lap #[LAPCOUNT] ([LAPTIME])
    In the major cities of industrialized countries at the end of the nineteenth century, important public places such as theaters, restaurants, shops and banks had installed electric lighting, but electricity was in less than one percent of homes, where lighting was still provided mainly by candles or gas

    B) electricity was in less than one percent of homes and lighting still
    C) there were less than one percent of homes with electricity, where lighting was still being
    D) there was less then one percent of homes that had electricity, having lighting that was still
    E) less than one percent of homes had electricity, where lighting had still been

    OA - A. Is this option not comparing electricity with theatres, restaurants...

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    piyush_nitt Master | Next Rank: 500 Posts Default Avatar
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    Post Thu Jan 29, 2009 2:08 am
    aroon7 wrote:
    In the major cities of industrialized countries at the end of the nineteenth century, important public places such as theaters, restaurants, shops and banks had installed electric lighting, but electricity was in less than one percent of homes, where lighting was still provided mainly by candles or gas

    B) electricity was in less than one percent of homes and lighting still
    C) there were less than one percent of homes with electricity, where lighting was still being
    D) there was less then one percent of homes that had electricity, having lighting that was still
    E) less than one percent of homes had electricity, where lighting had still been

    OA - A. Is this option not comparing electricity with theatres, restaurants...
    Aaroon ,

    As far as my understanding we don't use BUT for comparisons. BUT is used in sentences where author wants to show a "contrast". For comparsion , generally like or As is used.

    I think its quite easy to choose a right choice in this sentence, if you look at the "where" clause. where should refer to home.

    B) electricity was in less than one percent of homes and lighting still
    C) there were less than one percent of homes with electricity, where lighting was still being -
    D) there was less then one percent of homes that had electricity, having lighting that was still - electricity having lighting wrong
    E) less than one percent of homes had electricity, where lighting had still been

    aroon7 Master | Next Rank: 500 Posts Default Avatar
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    Post Thu Jan 29, 2009 7:31 pm
    piyush_nitt wrote:
    aroon7 wrote:
    In the major cities of industrialized countries at the end of the nineteenth century, important public places such as theaters, restaurants, shops and banks had installed electric lighting, but electricity was in less than one percent of homes, where lighting was still provided mainly by candles or gas

    B) electricity was in less than one percent of homes and lighting still
    C) there were less than one percent of homes with electricity, where lighting was still being
    D) there was less then one percent of homes that had electricity, having lighting that was still
    E) less than one percent of homes had electricity, where lighting had still been

    OA - A. Is this option not comparing electricity with theatres, restaurants...
    Aaroon ,

    As far as my understanding we don't use BUT for comparisons. BUT is used in sentences where author wants to show a "contrast". For comparsion , generally like or As is used.

    I think its quite easy to choose a right choice in this sentence, if you look at the "where" clause. where should refer to home.

    B) electricity was in less than one percent of homes and lighting still
    C) there were less than one percent of homes with electricity, where lighting was still being -
    D) there was less then one percent of homes that had electricity, having lighting that was still - electricity having lighting wrong
    E) less than one percent of homes had electricity, where lighting had still been
    thanks Pyuish!
    i chose E Embarassed

    mmslf75 Legendary Member Default Avatar
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    Post Tue Dec 15, 2009 10:14 am
    aroon7 wrote:
    In the major cities of industrialized countries at the end of the nineteenth century, important public places such as theaters, restaurants, shops and banks had installed electric lighting, but electricity was in less than one percent of homes, where lighting was still provided mainly by candles or gas

    B) electricity was in less than one percent of homes and lighting still
    C) there were less than one percent of homes with electricity, where lighting was still being
    D) there was less then one percent of homes that had electricity, having lighting that was still
    E) less than one percent of homes had electricity, where lighting had still been

    OA - A. Is this option not comparing electricity with theatres, restaurants...
    OA is A here, I have no issues in understanding why it is so..

    The one thing that disturbs me is the use of LESS, here for number of homes ??
    Don't u think its awkward...

    It should have been few right ?????


    I have one more example...where LESS is used this way...

    Even though the direct costs of malpractice disputes amounted to less than one percent of the $541 billion the nation spent on health care last year, doctors say fear of lawsuits plays a major role in health-care inflation

    Now less than 1% if 541b$ is a value...so why LESS used here ??

    Indeed, an other example

    When drive-ins were at the height of their popularity in the late 1950s, some 4,000 existed in the United States, but today there are less than one-quarter that many
    A. there are less than one-quarter that many
    B. there are fewer than one-quarter as many
    C. there are fewer than one-quarter of that amount
    D. the number is less than one-quarter the amount
    E. it is less than one-quarter of that amount

    OA is B...

    Please note I am not doubting the correctness of the anwers ... but would like to have inputs on this concept..

    x2suresh Master | Next Rank: 500 Posts Default Avatar
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    Post Tue Dec 15, 2009 1:25 pm
    mmslf75 wrote:
    aroon7 wrote:
    In the major cities of industrialized countries at the end of the nineteenth century, important public places such as theaters, restaurants, shops and banks had installed electric lighting, but electricity was in less than one percent of homes, where lighting was still provided mainly by candles or gas

    B) electricity was in less than one percent of homes and lighting still
    C) there were less than one percent of homes with electricity, where lighting was still being
    D) there was less then one percent of homes that had electricity, having lighting that was still
    E) less than one percent of homes had electricity, where lighting had still been

    OA - A. Is this option not comparing electricity with theatres, restaurants...
    OA is A here, I have no issues in understanding why it is so..

    The one thing that disturbs me is the use of LESS, here for number of homes ??
    Don't u think its awkward...

    It should have been few right ?????


    I have one more example...where LESS is used this way...

    Even though the direct costs of malpractice disputes amounted to less than one percent of the $541 billion the nation spent on health care last year, doctors say fear of lawsuits plays a major role in health-care inflation

    Now less than 1% if 541b$ is a value...so why LESS used here ??

    Indeed, an other example

    When drive-ins were at the height of their popularity in the late 1950s, some 4,000 existed in the United States, but today there are less than one-quarter that many
    A. there are less than one-quarter that many
    B. there are fewer than one-quarter as many
    C. there are fewer than one-quarter of that amount
    D. the number is less than one-quarter the amount
    E. it is less than one-quarter of that amount

    OA is B...

    Please note I am not doubting the correctness of the anwers ... but would like to have inputs on this concept..
    First two examples.. we are taking about percentage (%) not the number

    Ask questions
    How much percentage ? --> sounds good right
    How many percentage? --> Not correct.
    % is uncountable --> less is appropriate here.

    Last example we are taking about numbers (Drive-ins are countable)
    How many marks? -->not correct
    How much marks? --> few is appropriate here..
    I got fewer marks than you .
    I got less percentage than you.

    I hope this clears your doubt

    gmatv09 Master | Next Rank: 500 Posts Default Avatar
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    Post Tue Dec 15, 2009 2:59 pm
    IMO A becoz ...

    where correctly refers to homes

    mmslf75 Legendary Member Default Avatar
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    Post Tue Dec 15, 2009 9:42 pm
    x2suresh wrote:
    mmslf75 wrote:
    aroon7 wrote:
    In the major cities of industrialized countries at the end of the nineteenth century, important public places such as theaters, restaurants, shops and banks had installed electric lighting, but electricity was in less than one percent of homes, where lighting was still provided mainly by candles or gas

    B) electricity was in less than one percent of homes and lighting still
    C) there were less than one percent of homes with electricity, where lighting was still being
    D) there was less then one percent of homes that had electricity, having lighting that was still
    E) less than one percent of homes had electricity, where lighting had still been

    OA - A. Is this option not comparing electricity with theatres, restaurants...
    OA is A here, I have no issues in understanding why it is so..

    The one thing that disturbs me is the use of LESS, here for number of homes ??
    Don't u think its awkward...

    It should have been few right ?????


    I have one more example...where LESS is used this way...

    Even though the direct costs of malpractice disputes amounted to less than one percent of the $541 billion the nation spent on health care last year, doctors say fear of lawsuits plays a major role in health-care inflation

    Now less than 1% if 541b$ is a value...so why LESS used here ??

    Indeed, an other example

    When drive-ins were at the height of their popularity in the late 1950s, some 4,000 existed in the United States, but today there are less than one-quarter that many
    A. there are less than one-quarter that many
    B. there are fewer than one-quarter as many
    C. there are fewer than one-quarter of that amount
    D. the number is less than one-quarter the amount
    E. it is less than one-quarter of that amount

    OA is B...

    Please note I am not doubting the correctness of the anwers ... but would like to have inputs on this concept..
    First two examples.. we are taking about percentage (%) not the number

    Ask questions
    How much percentage ? --> sounds good right
    How many percentage? --> Not correct.
    % is uncountable --> less is appropriate here.

    Last example we are taking about numbers (Drive-ins are countable)
    How many marks? -->not correct
    How much marks? --> few is appropriate here..
    I got fewer marks than you .
    I got less percentage than you.

    I hope this clears your doubt
    Agreed, but literal meaning will require usage of "FEW"... I am confused..>!!

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    lunarpower GMAT Instructor
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    Post Fri Dec 18, 2009 10:16 pm
    hmm.

    i would agree with you here: it should be "fewer than 1% of homes", because we're still talking about individual homes. (it's an exact correlation to "fewer than one-quarter that many" on the later example; i don't think the gmat uses fractions any differently than it uses percents).

    my only possible explanation is that, sometimes, they get sloppy with things that are either
    (a) in ALL of the choices, or
    (b) in the non-underlined part.
    things that are in these locations don't contribute to the solution of the problem, so they can afford the sloppiness ... but still, it's not a good thing for those of you who are trying to learn!

    as another example, there's a problem, somewhere in the OG, whose solution actually boils down to "estimated at" vs. "estimated to be" - i.e., this is the ONLY thing separating the correct answer from one of the incorrect answers - and the solution says that "estimated at AGE" is wrong and "estimated to be AGE" is correct.
    but then they turn around and do this:
    http://www.beatthegmat.com/sc-with-surface-temperatures-estimated-at-minus-230-degrees-t43734.html

    i can only surmise that the same sort of thing is happening here.

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    Post Fri Dec 18, 2009 10:20 pm
    mmslf75 wrote:
    I have one more example...where LESS is used this way...

    Even though the direct costs of malpractice disputes amounted to less than one percent of the $541 billion the nation spent on health care last year, doctors say fear of lawsuits plays a major role in health-care inflation
    this, on the other hand, is correct usage.

    when you have NUMBER + UNIT OF MEASURE, you should use the terms that are normally reserved for uncountables.
    for instance:
    i am less than 6 feet tall (not "i am fewer than 6 feet tall")
    some of the books cost as little as $2 (not "as few as $2")

    there's a rationale behind this - i can explain if you're interested - although the rationale is ultimately irrelevant; you just want to make sure that you understand the rule itself.

    _________________
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    mmslf75 Legendary Member Default Avatar
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    Post Sat Dec 19, 2009 7:22 am
    lunarpower wrote:
    mmslf75 wrote:
    I have one more example...where LESS is used this way...

    Even though the direct costs of malpractice disputes amounted to less than one percent of the $541 billion the nation spent on health care last year, doctors say fear of lawsuits plays a major role in health-care inflation
    this, on the other hand, is correct usage.

    when you have NUMBER + UNIT OF MEASURE, you should use the terms that are normally reserved for uncountables.
    for instance:
    i am less than 6 feet tall (not "i am fewer than 6 feet tall")
    some of the books cost as little as $2 (not "as few as $2")

    there's a rationale behind this - i can explain if you're interested - although the rationale is ultimately irrelevant; you just want to make sure that you understand the rule itself.
    Thanks RON..will remember that,, One more TAKEAWAY !~!

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    Post Sat Dec 19, 2009 11:04 pm
    mmslf75 wrote:
    Thanks RON..will remember that,, One more TAKEAWAY !~!
    you got it.

    remember, the takeaways are all that really matters in the end.

    good luck

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    Nina1987 Senior | Next Rank: 100 Posts Default Avatar
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    Post Mon Jun 27, 2016 9:29 pm
    Ron, can you explain the rationale pls? Thanks

    lunarpower wrote:
    mmslf75 wrote:
    I have one more example...where LESS is used this way...

    Even though the direct costs of malpractice disputes amounted to less than one percent of the $541 billion the nation spent on health care last year, doctors say fear of lawsuits plays a major role in health-care inflation
    this, on the other hand, is correct usage.

    when you have NUMBER + UNIT OF MEASURE, you should use the terms that are normally reserved for uncountables.
    for instance:
    i am less than 6 feet tall (not "i am fewer than 6 feet tall")
    some of the books cost as little as $2 (not "as few as $2")

    there's a rationale behind this - i can explain if you're interested - although the rationale is ultimately irrelevant; you just want to make sure that you understand the rule itself.

    Nina1987 Senior | Next Rank: 100 Posts Default Avatar
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    Post Mon Jun 27, 2016 9:45 pm
    also, can we rule out E and C, simply cuz they violate touch rule ('where', a relative pronoun, wronlgy modifying 'electricity') w/o looking any other errors? thanks

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