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Diabetes and its complications

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goelmohit2002 Legendary Member Default Avatar
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Diabetes and its complications

Post Sat Sep 05, 2009 8:52 am
Hi All,

Following is OG-12, Q#5.

OA = "A". For kicking out C. OG says, "has the rank of" is unidiomatic. Can someone please tell why the same is unidiomatic.


==============================================
Diabetes, together with its serious complications, ranks as the nation's third leading cause of death, surpassed only by heart disease and cancer
(a) ranks as the nation's third leading cause of death, surpassed only
(b) rank as the nation's third leading cause of death, only surpassed
(c) has the rank of the nation's third leading cause of death, only surpassed
(d) are the nation's third leading causes of death, surpassed only
(e) have been ranked as the nation's third leading causes of death, only surpassed

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Salman Ghaffar Senior | Next Rank: 100 Posts
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Post Fri Dec 10, 2010 12:53 pm
As a general rule, whenever you see the construction "X, along with Y,...." forget about Y and focus only on X. If X is singular, choose a singular verb; if X is plural, choose a plural verb.

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tomada Master | Next Rank: 500 Posts
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Post Fri Dec 10, 2010 12:48 pm
My confusion with this question involved only choices (A) and (B), because I wasn't sure if "Diabetes, together with.." should be interpreted as singular or plural.

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tomada Master | Next Rank: 500 Posts
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Post Fri Dec 10, 2010 1:39 pm
That's awesome, thanks. Now, there are 3 things I can count on - death, taxes, and this construction


Salman Ghaffar wrote:
Nope. Works every time like a charm Smile

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Salman Ghaffar Senior | Next Rank: 100 Posts
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Post Fri Dec 10, 2010 1:28 pm
Nope. Works every time like a charm Smile

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tomada Master | Next Rank: 500 Posts
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Post Fri Dec 10, 2010 1:24 pm
Thank you, Salman. Can you think of any exceptions to that?


Salman Ghaffar wrote:
As a general rule, whenever you see the construction "X, along with Y,...." forget about Y and focus only on X. If X is singular, choose a singular verb; if X is plural, choose a plural verb.

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Salman Ghaffar Senior | Next Rank: 100 Posts
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Post Fri Dec 10, 2010 5:47 am
Would you say "Rafael Nadal ranks as the top tennis player" or "Rafael Nadal has the rank of the top tennis player"?

You would generally use the first construction.

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sudarshankumar Newbie | Next Rank: 10 Posts
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Post Fri Dec 10, 2010 1:59 am
I have one doubt....


I think "diabetes ranks as ...." is grammatically incorrect because diabetes doesn' rank anything but it is ranked .... tense should be passive.


among all the options even i went for A but ......

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Stacey Koprince GMAT Instructor
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Post Wed Oct 07, 2009 11:35 am
Received a PM asking me to reply.

One thing to know in general about idioms: there often aren't explainable rules for idioms. The explanation is "that's the way it is; memorize it." Annoying, but... that's the way it is. Smile

The relevant part of choice C says:
Diabetes has the rank of the nation's third leading cause of death.

First, FYI, "has" is not present perfect here. It is simple present. Present perfect is constructed by using both "has / have" AND the past participle of another verb. Eg, She has eaten three peaches today. "Has eaten" is present perfect. In the sentence above, we don't have a second verb - just "has." So that's simple present.

Next, If something "has the rank of X" then the main noun following that "of" should be the actual rank. "She has the rank of expert." "The dog has the rank of 4."

What noun follows in this sentence? "Diabetes has the rank of... cause." Is "cause (of death)" a rank? No - the rank is 3. Diabetes has the rank of third in the list of leading causes of death. (Totally awkward sentence, but that would work. Smile)

The correct answer avoids this problem by using a different structure: Diabetes ranks as X. Now, X can be the full descriptive phrase, the rank itself plus the broader description of that rank: eg, "the 4th best dog in the group."

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goelmohit2002 Legendary Member Default Avatar
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Post Sat Sep 05, 2009 10:44 pm
scoobydooby wrote:
also, "ranks" is far more concise than "has the rank of " which is wordy and awkward.
Hi Scooby,

Just one small query in order to avoid similar issues in future...is "has the rank of" awkward b'coz of following reason....

does "has" over here means possession and not the present perfect tense ? If yes...then can you please tell how to decide when it is possession and when the same is present perfect ?

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scoobydooby Legendary Member Default Avatar
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Post Sat Sep 05, 2009 11:31 am
also, "ranks" is far more concise than "has the rank of " which is wordy and awkward.

another error in C: "only" should be placed next to the phrase it limits. "surpassed only by x and y" is better than "only surpassed by x and y".
"by x and y" is the limiting phrase as these are the only two diseases ranking ahead of diabetes.

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goelmohit2002 Legendary Member Default Avatar
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Post Sat Sep 05, 2009 10:44 am
kyabe wrote:
I wont comment on OG's explanation (Since we are playing GMAT's game). But yes I can explain why C is wrong. C says that Diabetes has rank blah blah blah... How can diabetes have rank?? I dont think it can have any rank...

Does this makes sense??
Thanks Kyabe !!!

do you mean to say that "has" over here means possession and not the present perfect tense ? If yes...then can you please tell how to decide when it is possession and when the same is present perfect ?

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kyabe Senior | Next Rank: 100 Posts Default Avatar
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Post Sat Sep 05, 2009 10:34 am
I wont comment on OG's explanation (Since we are playing GMAT's game). But yes I can explain why C is wrong. C says that Diabetes has rank blah blah blah... How can diabetes have rank?? I dont think it can have any rank...

Does this makes sense??

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