• Kaplan Test Prep
    Free Practice Test & Review
    How would you score if you took the GMAT

    Available with Beat the GMAT members only code

    MORE DETAILS
    Kaplan Test Prep
  • PrepScholar GMAT
    5 Day FREE Trial
    Study Smarter, Not Harder

    Available with Beat the GMAT members only code

    MORE DETAILS
    PrepScholar GMAT
  • Target Test Prep
    5-Day Free Trial
    5-day free, full-access trial TTP Quant

    Available with Beat the GMAT members only code

    MORE DETAILS
    Target Test Prep
  • EMPOWERgmat Slider
    1 Hour Free
    BEAT THE GMAT EXCLUSIVE

    Available with Beat the GMAT members only code

    MORE DETAILS
    EMPOWERgmat Slider
  • Veritas Prep
    Free Veritas GMAT Class
    Experience Lesson 1 Live Free

    Available with Beat the GMAT members only code

    MORE DETAILS
    Veritas Prep
  • Varsity Tutors
    Award-winning private GMAT tutoring
    Register now and save up to $200

    Available with Beat the GMAT members only code

    MORE DETAILS
    Varsity Tutors
  • Economist Test Prep
    Free Trial & Practice Exam
    BEAT THE GMAT EXCLUSIVE

    Available with Beat the GMAT members only code

    MORE DETAILS
    Economist Test Prep
  • e-gmat Exclusive Offer
    Get 300+ Practice Questions
    25 Video lessons and 6 Webinars for FREE

    Available with Beat the GMAT members only code

    MORE DETAILS
    e-gmat Exclusive Offer
  • Magoosh
    Magoosh
    Study with Magoosh GMAT prep

    Available with Beat the GMAT members only code

    MORE DETAILS
    Magoosh

determine strenth of an argument

This topic has 1 expert reply and 1 member reply
bupbebeo Master | Next Rank: 500 Posts Default Avatar
Joined
01 Mar 2010
Posted:
134 messages
Thanked:
3 times

determine strenth of an argument

Post Mon Apr 26, 2010 3:35 am
Elapsed Time: 00:00
  • Lap #[LAPCOUNT] ([LAPTIME])
    How we determine the strength of an argument. We base on relationship between premises and conclusion or between assumption and conclusion?


    If we have an argument which is strong based on relationship between premises and conclusion. but its assumption is problematic. I wonder whether we can consider this argument strong?

    Need free GMAT or MBA advice from an expert? Register for Beat The GMAT now and post your question in these forums!
    sakali Senior | Next Rank: 100 Posts Default Avatar
    Joined
    12 Mar 2010
    Posted:
    38 messages
    Thanked:
    3 times
    Test Date:
    TBD
    Target GMAT Score:
    740
    Post Mon Apr 26, 2010 5:43 pm
    bupbebeo wrote:
    How we determine the strength of an argument. We base on relationship between premises and conclusion or between assumption and conclusion?


    If we have an argument which is strong based on relationship between premises and conclusion. but its assumption is problematic. I wonder whether we can consider this argument strong?
    Hey bupbebeo,
    You're right, the strength of an argument is determined by the premises, assumptions and Conclusion and if they all make sense together.

    I found this article that explains it much better than I do. (section 1.2)

    Quote:
    The strength of an argument is determined by the degree of logical
    strength that it possesses.

    logical strength: An argument has logical strength when its premises, if true, actually provide
    support for its conclusion.

    Notice that the (logical) strength of an argument does not depend on the truth of the premises.
    An argument is (logically) strong if when we suppose the premises are true, then the conclusion
    follows (or is made more reasonable). Thus, logical strength is a structural characteristic of an
    argument.

    GMAT/MBA Expert

    Testluv GMAT Instructor Default Avatar
    Joined
    19 Oct 2009
    Posted:
    1302 messages
    Followed by:
    162 members
    Thanked:
    539 times
    GMAT Score:
    800
    Post Mon Apr 26, 2010 9:25 pm
    bupbebeo wrote:
    How we determine the strength of an argument. We base on relationship between premises and conclusion or between assumption and conclusion?


    If we have an argument which is strong based on relationship between premises and conclusion. but its assumption is problematic. I wonder whether we can consider this argument strong?
    We can strengthen an argument by backing up the assumption. For example, if the assumption is "there are no other explanations", an answer choice that rules out an alternative explanation strengthens.

    We can also strengthen an argument by finding an answer choice that makes the conclusion more likely to come to true.

    In assumption, strengthen, and weaken question types, we should always avoid answer choices that directly restate or directly contradict the premises.

    _________________
    Kaplan Teacher in Toronto

    Free GMAT Practice Test under Proctored Conditions! - Find a practice test near you or live and online in Kaplan's Classroom Anywhere environment. Register today!

    Best Conversation Starters

    1 LUANDATO 148 topics
    2 lheiannie07 91 topics
    3 Roland2rule 79 topics
    4 AAPL 66 topics
    5 ardz24 64 topics
    See More Top Beat The GMAT Members...

    Most Active Experts

    1 image description EconomistGMATTutor

    The Economist GMAT Tutor

    157 posts
    2 image description Jay@ManhattanReview

    Manhattan Review

    128 posts
    3 image description GMATGuruNY

    The Princeton Review Teacher

    127 posts
    4 image description Rich.C@EMPOWERgma...

    EMPOWERgmat

    120 posts
    5 image description Brent@GMATPrepNow

    GMAT Prep Now Teacher

    109 posts
    See More Top Beat The GMAT Experts