• e-gmat Exclusive Offer
    Get 300+ Practice Questions
    25 Video lessons and 6 Webinars for FREE

    Available with Beat the GMAT members only code

    MORE DETAILS
    e-gmat Exclusive Offer
  • Veritas Prep
    Free Veritas GMAT Class
    Experience Lesson 1 Live Free

    Available with Beat the GMAT members only code

    MORE DETAILS
    Veritas Prep
  • EMPOWERgmat Slider
    1 Hour Free
    BEAT THE GMAT EXCLUSIVE

    Available with Beat the GMAT members only code

    MORE DETAILS
    EMPOWERgmat Slider
  • PrepScholar GMAT
    5 Day FREE Trial
    Study Smarter, Not Harder

    Available with Beat the GMAT members only code

    MORE DETAILS
    PrepScholar GMAT
  • Kaplan Test Prep
    Free Practice Test & Review
    How would you score if you took the GMAT

    Available with Beat the GMAT members only code

    MORE DETAILS
    Kaplan Test Prep
  • Magoosh
    Magoosh
    Study with Magoosh GMAT prep

    Available with Beat the GMAT members only code

    MORE DETAILS
    Magoosh
  • Varsity Tutors
    Award-winning private GMAT tutoring
    Register now and save up to $200

    Available with Beat the GMAT members only code

    MORE DETAILS
    Varsity Tutors
  • Economist Test Prep
    Free Trial & Practice Exam
    BEAT THE GMAT EXCLUSIVE

    Available with Beat the GMAT members only code

    MORE DETAILS
    Economist Test Prep
  • Target Test Prep
    5-Day Free Trial
    5-day free, full-access trial TTP Quant

    Available with Beat the GMAT members only code

    MORE DETAILS
    Target Test Prep

Criminals released from prison on parole have generally been

This topic has 1 member reply

Criminals released from prison on parole have generally been

Post Wed Nov 29, 2017 6:19 pm
Criminals released from prison on parole have generally been put under routine supervision. A recent program has allowed criminals to leave prison early under intensive supervision; they must obey curfews and in some cases they must be electronically monitored. The percentage of released criminals arrested while under supervision is the same for intensive supervision as for routine supervision, so intensive supervision is no more effective than routine supervision in preventing criminals from committing additional crimes.

Which one of the following is an assumption on which the argument relies?

(A) The criminals under intensive supervision, but not those under routine supervision, were required to work or attend school during their supervision period.
(B) All of the criminals who were arrested while under routine supervision had been in prison more than once before being paroled and put under supervision.
(C) The proportion of arrests to crimes committed was not significantly higher for criminals under intensive supervision than those under routine supervision.
(D) Of the criminals arrested while under intensive supervision, some would not have committed crimes if they had been under routine supervision.
(E) The number of criminals put under routine supervision was not significantly greater than the number of criminals put under intensive supervision.

What's the best approach to determine the answer? Can any experts help?

  • +1 Upvote Post
  • Quote
  • Flag
Need free GMAT or MBA advice from an expert? Register for Beat The GMAT now and post your question in these forums!

Top Member

elias.latour.apex Master | Next Rank: 500 Posts
Joined
20 Apr 2017
Posted:
202 messages
Followed by:
1 members
Upvotes:
32
GMAT Score:
770
Most Active Member Most Responsive Member
Post Sat Dec 02, 2017 5:47 am
How do we find assumptions? There are many ways, but the first step is to identify the conclusion of an argument. In this case the conclusion is:

Intensive supervision is no more effective than routine supervision in preventing criminals from committing additional crimes.

Why? Why does the argument think so? Because:

The percentage of released criminals arrested while under supervision is the same for intensive supervision as for routine supervision.

What's the assumption? Well, one way to find an assumption is to look for new, surprising words in the conclusion-words or concepts that are not mentioned in the premises. In this case, the conclusion is about COMMITTING CRIMES whereas the premise talks about BEING ARRESTED. Are these two concepts the same? Isn't it possible that someone could be arrested without having committed a crime or that a person might commit a crime yet not get arrested for it? Perhaps those under intensive supervision are invariably caught every time they commit a crime whereas those under routine supervision are caught no more than once every 3 or 4 crimes committed.

(C) is the answer that fits in well with the reasoning we have already explored above.

_________________
Elias Latour
Verbal Specialist @ ApexGMAT
blog.apexgmat.com
+1 (646) 736-7622

  • +1 Upvote Post
  • Quote
  • Flag

Best Conversation Starters

1 Roland2rule 165 topics
2 lheiannie07 110 topics
3 ardz24 60 topics
4 Vincen 50 topics
5 LUANDATO 49 topics
See More Top Beat The GMAT Members...

Most Active Experts

1 image description Brent@GMATPrepNow

GMAT Prep Now Teacher

150 posts
2 image description GMATGuruNY

The Princeton Review Teacher

125 posts
3 image description Jeff@TargetTestPrep

Target Test Prep

120 posts
4 image description Rich.C@EMPOWERgma...

EMPOWERgmat

116 posts
5 image description Scott@TargetTestPrep

Target Test Prep

100 posts
See More Top Beat The GMAT Experts