• Veritas Prep
    Free Veritas GMAT Class
    Experience Lesson 1 Live Free

    Available with Beat the GMAT members only code

    MORE DETAILS
    Veritas Prep
  • Kaplan Test Prep
    Free Practice Test & Review
    How would you score if you took the GMAT

    Available with Beat the GMAT members only code

    MORE DETAILS
    Kaplan Test Prep
  • Economist Test Prep
    Free Trial & Practice Exam
    BEAT THE GMAT EXCLUSIVE

    Available with Beat the GMAT members only code

    MORE DETAILS
    Economist Test Prep
  • Varsity Tutors
    Award-winning private GMAT tutoring
    Register now and save up to $200

    Available with Beat the GMAT members only code

    MORE DETAILS
    Varsity Tutors
  • e-gmat Exclusive Offer
    Get 300+ Practice Questions
    25 Video lessons and 6 Webinars for FREE

    Available with Beat the GMAT members only code

    MORE DETAILS
    e-gmat Exclusive Offer
  • PrepScholar GMAT
    5 Day FREE Trial
    Study Smarter, Not Harder

    Available with Beat the GMAT members only code

    MORE DETAILS
    PrepScholar GMAT
  • Magoosh
    Magoosh
    Study with Magoosh GMAT prep

    Available with Beat the GMAT members only code

    MORE DETAILS
    Magoosh
  • EMPOWERgmat Slider
    1 Hour Free
    BEAT THE GMAT EXCLUSIVE

    Available with Beat the GMAT members only code

    MORE DETAILS
    EMPOWERgmat Slider
  • Target Test Prep
    5-Day Free Trial
    5-day free, full-access trial TTP Quant

    Available with Beat the GMAT members only code

    MORE DETAILS
    Target Test Prep

Black colleges problem. idiom? wordy?

This topic has 5 member replies
Castor.kim Junior | Next Rank: 30 Posts
Joined
30 Aug 2012
Posted:
22 messages

Black colleges problem. idiom? wordy?

Post Fri Oct 19, 2012 1:27 am
Elapsed Time: 00:00
  • Lap #[LAPCOUNT] ([LAPTIME])
    A consortium of historically Black colleges in the United States, capitalizing on such schools’ traditionally rich relationships with African nations, integrates African concerns into an international business study.

    a.capitalizing on such schools’ traditionally rich relationships with African nations
    b.while capitalizing on the traditionally rich relationships of such schools and African nations
    c.through capitalizing on such schools’ and African nations’ traditionally rich relationships
    d.which capitalize on the traditionally rich relationships of such schools and African nations
    e.in capitalizing on such schools’ and African nations’ traditionally rich relationship

    in my thought..
    a. school's traditionally.. looks wordy
    b. relationship of.. looks non-sense and distort the meaning..
    c. school's and african nations' ... looks wordy, but its parallel..
    d. relationship of .. like b
    e. like c.. looks wordy..

    any way, gmat want to decide the most efficient one..
    I choose "c"

    but OA is "A"

    please explain about your opinion..

    Need free GMAT or MBA advice from an expert? Register for Beat The GMAT now and post your question in these forums!
    vikram4689 Legendary Member
    Joined
    01 Nov 2009
    Posted:
    1325 messages
    Followed by:
    14 members
    Thanked:
    105 times
    Post Fri Oct 19, 2012 3:21 am
    your approach tells me that you have just started preparing. wordy/awkward are useless words unless you understand other rules well.

    on my first reading i felt a) is correct. then i looked for errors in others:
    b) needs a verb after "which"
    d) has verb-tense error
    c) and e) changes meaning... it seems nations and schools have relationships with some 3rd party. however, a) clearly mentions that relationship is between nations and schools

    _________________
    Premise: If you like my post
    Conclusion : Press the Thanks Button Wink

    ihatemaths Master | Next Rank: 500 Posts Default Avatar
    Joined
    01 May 2012
    Posted:
    122 messages
    Thanked:
    3 times
    Post Fri Oct 19, 2012 3:21 am
    C actually changes the meaning or I would say distorts the meaning.it's wordy too.

    gmatdriller Master | Next Rank: 500 Posts Default Avatar
    Joined
    04 Jul 2010
    Posted:
    418 messages
    Followed by:
    2 members
    Thanked:
    6 times
    Post Fri Oct 19, 2012 8:20 am
    The consortium, capitalizing on X, does Y.

    The consortium of colleges, capitalizing on something, integrates another thing.

    The consortium, CAPITALIZING ON
    the traditionally rich relationship it(the consortium of schools)] has with black African nations)

    INTEGRATES
    (African concerns into an international business study)

    For clarity, I interpreted "such schools' traditionally rich relationship with African nations" to mean "the traditionally rich relationship it has with African nations"

    Does this make sense?

    Bakhtior Junior | Next Rank: 30 Posts Default Avatar
    Joined
    22 Nov 2010
    Posted:
    17 messages
    Thanked:
    1 times
    Post Fri Oct 19, 2012 8:43 am
    Castor.kim wrote:
    A consortium of historically Black colleges in the United States, capitalizing on such schools’ traditionally rich relationships with African nations, integrates African concerns into an international business study.

    a.capitalizing on such schools’ traditionally rich relationships with African nations
    b.while capitalizing on the traditionally rich relationships of such schools and African nations
    c.through capitalizing on such schools’ and African nations’ traditionally rich relationships
    d.which capitalize on the traditionally rich relationships of such schools and African nations
    e.in capitalizing on such schools’ and African nations’ traditionally rich relatio

    in B must be schools' relationships with African nations or relationships between such schools and African nations. Another error is -ing form gives evidence for how it integrates.
    in C such schools' and African nation's relationships means relationships of every one of them, not interrelationship.
    in my thought..
    a. school's traditionally.. looks wordy
    b. relationship of.. looks non-sense and distort the meaning..
    c. school's and african nations' ... looks wordy, but its parallel..
    d. relationship of .. like b
    e. like c.. looks wordy..

    any way, gmat want to decide the most efficient one..
    I choose "c"

    but OA is "A"

    please explain about your opinion..

    keddie Newbie | Next Rank: 10 Posts Default Avatar
    Joined
    22 Aug 2015
    Posted:
    2 messages
    Post Fri Oct 21, 2016 11:27 pm
    I would like to make a contribution.

    The intended meaning of this sentence is that a consortium that capitalizes on such schools' relationships with African nations integrates concerns into a study, so we notice that the relationship is between such schools and African nations. Therefore, e and c are incorrect, because they say two relationships, that is, such schools' relationship and nations' relationship. B and d are incorrect because "relationships of" is awkward, and "relationships between" is the correct idiom.

    Best Conversation Starters

    1 LUANDATO 148 topics
    2 lheiannie07 91 topics
    3 Roland2rule 79 topics
    4 AAPL 66 topics
    5 ardz24 64 topics
    See More Top Beat The GMAT Members...

    Most Active Experts

    1 image description EconomistGMATTutor

    The Economist GMAT Tutor

    157 posts
    2 image description Jay@ManhattanReview

    Manhattan Review

    128 posts
    3 image description GMATGuruNY

    The Princeton Review Teacher

    127 posts
    4 image description Rich.C@EMPOWERgma...

    EMPOWERgmat

    120 posts
    5 image description Brent@GMATPrepNow

    GMAT Prep Now Teacher

    109 posts
    See More Top Beat The GMAT Experts